Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

UPDATE: Solution right after question.

Question:

Usually, synchronization is serializing parallel requests within a JVM, e.g.

private static final Object LOCK = new Object();

public void doSomething() {
  ...
  synchronized(LOCK) {
    ...
  }
  ...
}

When looking at web applications, some synchronization on "JVM global" scope is maybe becoming a performance bottleneck and synchronization only within the scope of the user's HttpSession would make more sense.

Is the following code a possibility? I doubt that synchronizing on the session object is a good idea but it would be interesting to hear your thoughts.

HttpSession session = getHttpServletRequest().getSession();
synchronized (session) {
  ...
}

Key Question:
Is it guaranteed that the session object is the same instance for all threads processing requests from the same user?

Summarized answer / solution:

It seems that the session object itself is not always the same as it depends on the implementation of the servlet container (Tomcat, Glassfish, ...) and the getSession() method might return just a wrapper instance.

So it is recommended to use a custom variable stored in the session to be used as locking object.

Here is my code proposal, feedback is welcome:

somewhere in a Helper Class, e.g. MyHelper:

private static final Object LOCK = new Object();

public static Object getSessionLock(HttpServletRequest request) {
    Object result = request.getSession().getAttribute("SESSION_LOCK");
    if (result == null) {
        // only if there is no session-lock object in the session we apply the global lock
        synchronized (LOCK) {
            // as it can be that another thread has updated the session-lock object in the meantime, we have to read it again from the session and create it only if it is not there yet!
            result = request.getSession().getAttribute("SESSION_LOCK");
            if (result == null) {
                result = new Object();
                request.getSession().setAttribute("SESSION_LOCK", result);
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}

and then you can use it:

Object sessionLock = MyHelper.getSessionLock(getRequest());
synchronized (sessionLock) {
  ...
}

Any comments on this solution?

share|improve this question
    
1  
It is not a duplicate as the linked question is about thread safety of session variables. I am asking whether you can lock on the session object itself. –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 10:14
1  
@SahilMuthoo: I disagree, the OP asks which object is safe to be used for HttpSession synchronization/locking, not whether HttpSession is thread-safe or not. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Mar 21 '12 at 10:14
2  
In doubt you could put a property in your session just for locking. Be aware though, that synchronized will not work if you use a cluster with session replication and when several requests for the same session are handled by different servers. –  user1252434 Mar 21 '12 at 10:27
    
@user1252434 like the code snippet in my question? I updated it with a possible solution. –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 12:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I found this nice explanation in JavaDoc for WebUtils.getSessionMutex():

In many cases, the HttpSession reference itself is a safe mutex as well, since it will always be the same object reference for the same active logical session. However, this is not guaranteed across different servlet containers; the only 100% safe way is a session mutex.

This method is used as a lock when synchronizeOnSession flag is set:

Object mutex = WebUtils.getSessionMutex(session);
synchronized (mutex) {
    return handleRequestInternal(request, response);
}

If you look at the implementation of getSessionMutex(), it actually uses some custom session attribute if present (under org.springframework.web.util.WebUtils.MUTEX key) or HttpSession instance if not:

Object mutex = session.getAttribute(SESSION_MUTEX_ATTRIBUTE);
if (mutex == null) {
    mutex = session;
}
return mutex;

Back to plain servlet spec - to be 100% sure use custom session attribute rather than HttpSession object itself.

See also

share|improve this answer
    
This is only useful if you use the Spring Core framework? –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 12:11
1  
@basZero: no, I have shown code samples from Spring MVC source just to give you an example how it is implemented in mature web framework. You can base your own solution on these simple concepts. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Mar 21 '12 at 12:21
    
@Tomasz_Nurkiewicz ok, updated my question with a custom solution proposal. –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 12:53

In general, don't rely on HttpServletRequest.getSession() returning same object. It's easy for servlet filters to create a wrapper around session for whatever reason. Your code will only see this wrapper, and it will be different object on each request. Put some shared lock into the session itself. (Too bad there is no putIfAbsent though).

share|improve this answer
    
Very good point regarding wrappers. The idea to put an object into the session is very good. Did you use that already? –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 10:31
    
I've used combined technique ... lock object stored in the session, and synchronizing on the session itself for putting this lock object into it :-) –  Peter Štibraný Mar 21 '12 at 10:34
    
Hi @PeterŠtibraný , something like in my summarized answer above? –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 12:09
1  
@basZero: yes, your code is almost line-to-line identical to mine. I've done the synchronization block on the session itself, but your solution is better (exactly for the reason stated in my answer). –  Peter Štibraný Mar 21 '12 at 13:21

Synchronization occurs when a lock is placed on an object reference, so that threads that reference the same object will treat any synchronization on that shared object as a toll gate.

So, what your question raises an interesting point: Does the HttpSession object in two separate web calls from the same session end up as the same object reference in the web container, or are they two objects that just happen to have similar data in them? I found this interesting discussion on stateful web apps which discusses HttpSession somewhat. Also, there is this discussion at CodeRanch about thread safety in HttpSession.

From those discussions, it seems like the HttpSession is indeed the same object. One easy test would be to write a simple servlet, look at the HttpServletRequest.getSession(), and see if it references the same session object on multiple calls. If it does, then I think your theory is sound and you could use it to sync between user calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the first pointer, the author Brian Goetz is anyway the Guru when it comes to concurrency. As of his writing, it seems to be OK to synchronize on the session object: Serializing requests on an HttpSession makes many concurrency hazards go away –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 10:25

As people already said, sessions can be wrapped by the servlet containers and this generates a problem: the session hashCode() is different between requests, i.e., they are not the same instance and thus can't be synchronized! Many containers allow persist a session. In this cases, in certain time, when session was expired, it is persisted on disk. Even when session is retrieved by deserialization, it is not same object as earlier, because it don't shares same memory address like when was at memory before the serialization process. When session is loaded from disk, it is put into memory for further access, until "maxInactiveInterval" is reached (expires). Summing up: the session could be not the same between many web requests! It will be the same while is in memory. Even if you put an attribute into the session to share lock, it will not work, because it will be serialized as well in the persistence phase.

share|improve this answer
    
So you are saying that my documented solution won't work? I thought synchronizing on an object in the session (attribute) will work. –  basZero Oct 27 '13 at 17:53
    
Did you test it? –  Lucas Batistussi Oct 27 '13 at 19:28
    
No not yet, I'm in the process of finding the correct solution before I start implementation –  basZero Oct 28 '13 at 19:54

The answers are correct. If you want to avoid the same user executes 2 different (or the same) requests at the same time, you can synchronize on the HttpSession. The best to do this is to use a Filter.

Notes:

  • if your resources (images, scripts, and any non-dynamic file) also comes through the servlet, you could create a bottleneck. Then be sure, the synchonization is only done on dynamic pages.
  • Try to avoid the getSession directly, you should better test if the session already exists because a session is not automatically created for guests (as nothing has to be stored in the session). Then, if you call getSession(), the session will be created and memory will be lost. Then use getSession(false) and try to deal with the null result if no session already exists (in this case, don't synchronize).
share|improve this answer
    
If you do synchronization inside filter, then you're essentially disabling concurrent request processing for same session. It may or may not be what you want, but it sounds like too broad synchronization to me. One should always strive to synchronize on smallest possible area. –  Peter Štibraný Mar 21 '12 at 10:28
    
Thanks for pointing out not to create useless session objects. The section where I would synchronize on the session is only within one specific usecase where the user is anyway logged in. –  basZero Mar 21 '12 at 10:29

The spring framework solution as mentioned by Tomasz Nurkiewicz is accidentally correct in clustered environments only because the Servlet spec requires session consistency across multiple JVMs. Otherwise, it does not do a magic on its own for the scenarios where multiple requests are spread across different machines. See the discussion in this thread that sheds some light on the subject.

share|improve this answer

Using

private static final Object LOCK = new Object();

you are using the same lock for all sessions and it was the core reason for deadlock I did face. So every session in your implementation has the same race condition, which is bad.

It needs change.

Other suggested answer:

Object mutex = session.getAttribute(SESSION_MUTEX_ATTRIBUTE);
if (mutex == null) {
  mutex = session;
}
return mutex;

seems much better.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, but have a look at my summarized solution at the top. The object LOCK is only used when the session attributed is created, this is required to synchronize globally in order to avoid to requests creating objects in the session. –  basZero Oct 30 '13 at 9:53
    
I got deadlocks at my webapp numbeo.com when trying to synchronize globally when the session attribute is created. The underlying reason might be that some request, session and response methods might require round trip time which could go up to 1s max latency time. –  Mladen Adamovic Oct 31 '13 at 7:50
    
synchronizing globally is a valid use case. your deadlocks might come from your implementation, how you use them. –  basZero Nov 1 '13 at 8:53
    
are you sure that request, response and session method invoke after all request has been read in your web server (so it is cached in the container). If so, than you are right. –  Mladen Adamovic Nov 2 '13 at 10:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.