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Several Linq.Enumerable functions take an IEqualityComparer<T>. Is there a convenient wrapper class that adapts a delegate(T,T)=>bool to implement IEqualityComparer<T>? It's easy enough to write one (if your ignore problems with defining a correct hashcode), but I'd like to know if there is an out-of-the-box solution.

Specifically, I want to do set operations on Dictionarys, using only the Keys to define membership (while retaining the values according to different rules).

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13 Answers 13

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Ordinarily, I'd get this resolved by commenting @Sam on the answer (I've done some editing on the original post to clean it up a bit without altering the behavior.)

The following is my riff of @Sam's answer, with a [IMNSHO] critical fix to the default hashing policy:-

class FuncEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    readonly Func<T, T, bool> _comparer;
    readonly Func<T, int> _hash;

    public FuncEqualityComparer( Func<T, T, bool> comparer )
        : this( comparer, t => 0 ) // NB Cannot assume anything about how e.g., t.GetHashCode() interacts with the comparer's behavior
    {
    }

    public FuncEqualityComparer( Func<T, T, bool> comparer, Func<T, int> hash )
    {
        _comparer = comparer;
        _hash = hash;
    }

    public bool Equals( T x, T y )
    {
        return _comparer( x, y );
    }

    public int GetHashCode( T obj )
    {
        return _hash( obj );
    }
}
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4  
As far as I'm concerned this is the correct answer. Any IEqualityComparer<T> that leaves GetHashCode out is just straight-up broken. –  Dan Tao Sep 16 '10 at 13:47
    
@Dan Tao: I might be missing something here, but the implementation that you gave in your answer delegates to T.GetHashCode, and this is not guaranteed to be a good hash code. So are the other implementations more correct by providing an explicit hash function? Also, why do you need the equality comparison at all, since if you had a hash function, you could test equality by comparing the hashes and not the object keys themselves? –  Joshua Frank Dec 18 '10 at 20:43
    
@Joshua Frank: It's not valid to use hash equality to imply equality - only the inverse is true. In short, @Dan Tao is completely correct in what he says, and this answer is simply the application of this fact to a previously incomplete answer –  Ruben Bartelink Dec 20 '10 at 5:10
1  
@Ruben: Thanks for your valuable thoughts on this while I've been silent (read: lazy)! @Joshua: Here's the thing. The OP is asking about creating a custom IEqualityComparer<T> implementation using a single delegate to use for the Equals method, right? There are actually two flavors of response here, which I think may have gotten you confused. One is that this idea needs to be supplemented with a custom GetHashCode function; that is, no IEqualityComparer<T> implementation is truly functional without Equals and GetHashCode, for reasons explained already. (continued) –  Dan Tao Dec 22 '10 at 20:47
2  
In other words, since you are using a custom comparer it has nothing to do with the object's default hash code related to the default comparer, thus you cannot use it. –  Peet Brits Jan 13 '11 at 11:13

On the importance of GetHashCode

Others have already commented on the fact that any custom IEqualityComparer<T> implementation should really include a GetHashCode method; but nobody's bothered to explain why in any detail.

Here's why. Your question specifically mentions the LINQ extension methods; nearly all of these rely on hash codes to work properly, because they utilize hash tables internally for efficiency.

Take Distinct, for example. Consider the implications of this extension method if all it utilized were an Equals method. How do you determine whether an item's already been scanned in a sequence if you only have Equals? You enumerate over the entire collection of values you've already looked at and check for a match. This would result in Distinct using a worst-case O(N2) algorithm instead of an O(N) one!

Fortunately, this isn't the case. Distinct doesn't just use Equals; it uses GetHashCode as well. In fact, it absolutely does not work properly without an IEqualityComparer<T> that supplies a proper GetHashCode. Below is a contrived example illustrating this.

Say I have the following type:

class Value
{
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public int Number { get; private set; }

    public Value(string name, int number)
    {
        Name = name;
        Number = number;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("{0}: {1}", Name, Number);
    }
}

Now say I have a List<Value> and I want to find all of the elements with a distinct name. This is a perfect use case for Distinct using a custom equality comparer. So let's use the Comparer<T> class from Aku's answer:

var comparer = new Comparer<Value>((x, y) => x.Name == y.Name);

Now, if we have a bunch of Value elements with the same Name property, they should all collapse into one value returned by Distinct, right? Let's see...

var values = new List<Value>();

var random = new Random();
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
{
    values.Add("x", random.Next());
}

var distinct = values.Distinct(comparer);

foreach (Value x in distinct)
{
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Output:

x: 1346013431
x: 1388845717
x: 1576754134
x: 1104067189
x: 1144789201
x: 1862076501
x: 1573781440
x: 646797592
x: 655632802
x: 1206819377

Hmm, that didn't work, did it?

What about GroupBy? Let's try that:

var grouped = values.GroupBy(x => x, comparer);

foreach (IGrouping<Value> g in grouped)
{
    Console.WriteLine("[KEY: '{0}']", g);
    foreach (Value x in g)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x);
    }
}

Output:

[KEY = 'x: 1346013431']
x: 1346013431
[KEY = 'x: 1388845717']
x: 1388845717
[KEY = 'x: 1576754134']
x: 1576754134
[KEY = 'x: 1104067189']
x: 1104067189
[KEY = 'x: 1144789201']
x: 1144789201
[KEY = 'x: 1862076501']
x: 1862076501
[KEY = 'x: 1573781440']
x: 1573781440
[KEY = 'x: 646797592']
x: 646797592
[KEY = 'x: 655632802']
x: 655632802
[KEY = 'x: 1206819377']
x: 1206819377

Again: didn't work.

If you think about it, it would make sense for Distinct to use a HashSet<T> (or equivalent) internally, and for GroupBy to use something like a Dictionary<TKey, List<T>> internally. Could this explain why these methods don't work? Let's try this:

var uniqueValues = new HashSet<Value>(values, comparer);

foreach (Value x in uniqueValues)
{
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Output:

x: 1346013431
x: 1388845717
x: 1576754134
x: 1104067189
x: 1144789201
x: 1862076501
x: 1573781440
x: 646797592
x: 655632802
x: 1206819377

Yeah... starting to make sense?

Hopefully from these examples it's clear why including an appropriate GetHashCode in any IEqualityComparer<T> implementation is so important.


Original answer

Expanding on orip's answer:

There are a couple of improvements that can be made here.

  1. First, I'd take a Func<T, TKey> instead of Func<T, object>; this will prevent boxing of value type keys in the actual keyExtractor itself.
  2. Second, I'd actually add a where TKey : IEquatable<TKey> constraint; this will prevent boxing in the Equals call (object.Equals takes an object parameter; you need an IEquatable<TKey> implementation to take a TKey parameter without boxing it). Clearly this may pose too severe a restriction, so you could make a base class without the constraint and a derived class with it.

Here's what the resulting code might look like:

public class KeyEqualityComparer<T, TKey> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    protected readonly Func<T, TKey> keyExtractor;

    public KeyEqualityComparer(Func<T, TKey> keyExtractor)
    {
        this.keyExtractor = keyExtractor;
    }

    public virtual bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return this.keyExtractor(x).Equals(this.keyExtractor(y));
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return this.keyExtractor(obj).GetHashCode();
    }
}

public class StrictKeyEqualityComparer<T, TKey> : KeyEqualityComparer<T, TKey>
    where TKey : IEquatable<TKey>
{
    public StrictKeyEqualityComparer(Func<T, TKey> keyExtractor)
        : base(keyExtractor)
    { }

    public override bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        // This will use the overload that accepts a TKey parameter
        // instead of an object parameter.
        return this.keyExtractor(x).Equals(this.keyExtractor(y));
    }
}
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1  
+1 for a great answer. If I could, this would deserve a couple of extra +1's as well! –  Nailuj Mar 28 '11 at 15:00
1  
@Bruno: I type really fast. –  Dan Tao May 27 '11 at 17:14
1  
Your StrictKeyEqualityComparer.Equals method appears to be the same as KeyEqualityComparer.Equals. Does the TKey : IEquatable<TKey> constraint make TKey.Equals work differently? –  Justin Morgan May 9 '12 at 20:48
2  
@JustinMorgan: Yes--in the first case, since TKey may be any arbitrary type, the compiler will use the virtual method Object.Equals which will require boxing of value type parameters, e.g., int. In the latter case, however, since TKey is constrained to implement IEquatable<TKey>, the TKey.Equals method will be used which will not require any boxing. –  Dan Tao May 9 '12 at 20:59
1  
Very interesting, thanks for the info. I had no idea GetHashCode had these LINQ implications until seeing these answers. Great to know for future use. –  Justin Morgan May 10 '12 at 14:51

When you want to customize equality checking, 99% of the time you're interested in defining the keys to compare by, not the comparison itself.

This could be an elegant solution (concept from Python's list sort method).

Usage:

var foo = new List<string> { "abc", "de", "DE" };

// case-insensitive distinct
var distinct = foo.Distinct(new KeyEqualityComparer<string>( x => x.ToLower() ) );

The KeyEqualityComparer class:

public class KeyEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T, object> keyExtractor;

    public KeyEqualityComparer(Func<T,object> keyExtractor)
    {
        this.keyExtractor = keyExtractor;
    }

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return this.keyExtractor(x).Equals(this.keyExtractor(y));
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return this.keyExtractor(obj).GetHashCode();
    }
}
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1  
This is much better than aku's answer. –  SLaks Jun 9 '10 at 15:11
1  
This class nails it. –  Tormod Jul 1 '10 at 7:28
    
Definitely the right approach. There are a couple improvements that can be made, in my opinion, which I've mentioned in my own answer. –  Dan Tao Sep 15 '10 at 16:41
1  
This is very elegant code, but it doesn't answer the question, which is why I accepted @aku's answer instead. I wanted a wrapper for Func<T, T, bool> and I have no requirement to extract a key, since the key is already separated out in my Dictionary. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 15 '10 at 22:10
5  
@Marcelo: That's fine, you can do that; but be aware that if you're going to take @aku's approach, you really should add a Func<T, int> to supply the hash code for a T value (as has been suggested in, e.g., Ruben's answer). Otherwise the IEqualityComparer<T> implementation you're left with is quite broken, especially with regards to its usefulness in LINQ extension methods. See my answer for a discussion on why this is. –  Dan Tao Sep 16 '10 at 13:46

I'm afraid there is no such wrapper out-of-box. However it's not hard to create one:

class Comparer<T>: IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T, T, bool> _comparer;

    public Comparer(Func<T, T, bool> comparer)
    {
        if (comparer == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");

        _comparer = comparer;
    }

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return _comparer(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return obj.ToString().ToLower().GetHashCode();
    }
}

...

Func<int, int, bool> f = (x, y) => x == y;
var comparer = new Comparer<int>(f);
Console.WriteLine(comparer.Equals(1, 1));
Console.WriteLine(comparer.Equals(1, 2));
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1  
However, be careful with that implementation of GetHashCode. If you're actually going to be using it in some sort of hash table you'll want something a bit more robust. –  thecoop Jun 15 '09 at 11:27
42  
this code has a serious problem! it is easy to come up with a class that has two objects that are equal in terms of this comparer but have different hash codes. –  empi Feb 12 '10 at 16:27
10  
To remedy this, the class needs another member private readonly Func<T, int> _hashCodeResolver that must also be passed in the constructor and be used in the GetHashCode(...) method. –  herzmeister Sep 16 '10 at 13:53
6  
I'm curious: Why are you using obj.ToString().ToLower().GetHashCode() instead of obj.GetHashCode()? –  Justin Morgan May 9 '12 at 20:40
3  
The places in the framework that take an IEqualityComparer<T> invariably use hashing behind the scenes (e.g., LINQ's GroupBy, Distinct, Except, Join, etc) and the MS contract regarding hashing is broken in this implementation. Here's MS's documentation excerpt: "Implementations are required to ensure that if the Equals method returns true for two objects x and y, then the value returned by the GetHashCode method for x must equal the value returned for y." See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms132155 –  devgeezer Aug 23 '12 at 3:55

Same as Dan Tao's answer, but with a few improvements:

  1. Relies on EqualityComparer<>.Default to do the actual comparing so that it avoids boxing for value types (structs) that has implemented IEquatable<>.

  2. Since EqualityComparer<>.Default used it doesn't explode on null.Equals(something).

  3. Provided static wrapper around IEqualityComparer<> which will have a static method to create the instance of comparer - eases calling. Compare

    Equality<Person>.CreateComparer(p => p.ID);
    

    with

    new EqualityComparer<Person, int>(p => p.ID);
    
  4. Added an overload to specify IEqualityComparer<> for the key.

The class:

public static class Equality<T>
{
    public static IEqualityComparer<T> CreateComparer<V>(Func<T, V> keySelector)
    {
        return CreateComparer(keySelector, null);
    }

    public static IEqualityComparer<T> CreateComparer<V>(Func<T, V> keySelector, 
                                                         IEqualityComparer<V> comparer)
    {
        return new KeyEqualityComparer<V>(keySelector, comparer);
    }

    class KeyEqualityComparer<V> : IEqualityComparer<T>
    {
        readonly Func<T, V> keySelector;
        readonly IEqualityComparer<V> comparer;

        public KeyEqualityComparer(Func<T, V> keySelector, 
                                   IEqualityComparer<V> comparer)
        {
            if (keySelector == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("keySelector");

            this.keySelector = keySelector;
            this.comparer = comparer ?? EqualityComparer<V>.Default;
        }

        public bool Equals(T x, T y)
        {
            return comparer.Equals(keySelector(x), keySelector(y));
        }

        public int GetHashCode(T obj)
        {
            return comparer.GetHashCode(keySelector(obj));
        }
    }
}

you may use it like this:

var comparer1 = Equality<Person>.CreateComparer(p => p.ID);
var comparer2 = Equality<Person>.CreateComparer(p => p.Name);
var comparer3 = Equality<Person>.CreateComparer(p => p.Birthday.Year);
var comparer4 = Equality<Person>.CreateComparer(p => p.Name, StringComparer.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);

Person is a simple class:

class Person
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DateTime Birthday { get; set; }
}
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1  
+1 for providing an implementation that lets you provide a comparer for the key. Besides giving more flexibility this also avoids boxing value types for both the comparisons and also the hashing. –  devgeezer Aug 23 '12 at 3:06
1  
This is the most fleshed out answer here. I added a null check as well. Complete. –  nawfal Apr 18 '13 at 11:35
public class FuncEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    readonly Func<T, T, bool> _comparer;
    readonly Func<T, int> _hash;

    public FuncEqualityComparer( Func<T, T, bool> comparer )
        : this( comparer, t => t.GetHashCode())
    {
    }

    public FuncEqualityComparer( Func<T, T, bool> comparer, Func<T, int> hash )
    {
        _comparer = comparer;
        _hash = hash;
    }

    public bool Equals( T x, T y )
    {
        return _comparer( x, y );
    }

    public int GetHashCode( T obj )
    {
        return _hash( obj );
    }
}

With extensions :-

public static class SequenceExtensions
{
    public static bool SequenceEqual<T>( this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second, Func<T, T, bool> comparer )
    {
        return first.SequenceEqual( second, new FuncEqualityComparer<T>( comparer ) );
    }

    public static bool SequenceEqual<T>( this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second, Func<T, T, bool> comparer, Func<T, int> hash )
    {
        return first.SequenceEqual( second, new FuncEqualityComparer<T>( comparer, hash ) );
    }
}
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@Sam (who no longer exists as of this comment): Cleaned up code without anjusting behavior (and +1'd). Added Riff at stackoverflow.com/questions/98033/… –  Ruben Bartelink Sep 15 '10 at 16:25
1  
Whoa, what happened to Sam?! –  Dan Tao Sep 16 '10 at 13:52

orip's answer is great.

Here a little extension method to make it even easier:

public static IEnumerable<T> Distinct<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list, Func<T, object>    keyExtractor)
{
    return list.Distinct(new KeyEqualityComparer<T>(keyExtractor));
}
var distinct = foo.Distinct(x => x.ToLower())
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I'm going to answer my own question. To treat Dictionaries as sets, the simplest method seems to be to apply set operations to dict.Keys, then convert back to Dictionaries with Enumerable.ToDictionary(...).

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Just one optimization: We can use the out-of-the-box EqualityComparer for value comparisions, rather than delegating it.

This would also make the implementation cleaner as actual comparision logic now stays in GetHashCode() and Equals() which you may have already overloaded.

Here is the code:

public class MyComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T> 
{ 
  public bool Equals(T x, T y) 
  { 
    return EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(x, y); 
  } 

  public int GetHashCode(T obj) 
  { 
    return obj.GetHashCode(); 
  } 
} 

Don't forget to overload GetHashCode() and Equals() methods on your object.

This post helped me: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/488250/c-compare-two-generic-values

Sushil

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1  
NB same issue as identified in comment on stackoverflow.com/questions/98033/… - CANT assume obj.GetHashCode() makes sense –  Ruben Bartelink Sep 15 '10 at 16:23
4  
I don't get the purpose of this one. You created an equality comparer that's equivalent to the default equality comparer. So why don't you use it directly? –  CodesInChaos Oct 7 '12 at 15:36

orip's answer is great. Expanding on orip's answer:

i think that the solution's key is use "Extension Method" to transfer the "anonymous type".

    public static class Comparer 
    {
      public static IEqualityComparer<T> CreateComparerForElements<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Func<T, object> keyExtractor)
      {
        return new KeyEqualityComparer<T>(keyExtractor);
      }
    }

Usage:

var n = ItemList.Select(s => new { s.Vchr, s.Id, s.Ctr, s.Vendor, s.Description, s.Invoice }).ToList();
n.AddRange(OtherList.Select(s => new { s.Vchr, s.Id, s.Ctr, s.Vendor, s.Description, s.Invoice }).ToList(););
n = n.Distinct(x=>new{Vchr=x.Vchr,Id=x.Id}).ToList();
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The implementation at (german text) Implementing IEqualityCompare with lambda expression cares about null values and uses extension methods to generate IEqualityComparer.

To create an IEqualityComparer in a Linq union your just have to write

persons1.Union(persons2, person => person.LastName)

The comparer:

public class LambdaEqualityComparer<TSource, TComparable> : IEqualityComparer<TSource>
{
  Func<TSource, TComparable> _keyGetter;

  public LambdaEqualityComparer(Func<TSource, TComparable> keyGetter)
  {
    _keyGetter = keyGetter;
  }

  public bool Equals(TSource x, TSource y)
  {
    if (x == null || y == null) return (x == null && y == null);
    return object.Equals(_keyGetter(x), _keyGetter(y));
  }

  public int GetHashCode(TSource obj)
  {
    if (obj == null) return int.MinValue;
    var k = _keyGetter(obj);
    if (k == null) return int.MaxValue;
    return k.GetHashCode();
  }
}

You also need to add an extension method to support type inference

public static class LambdaEqualityComparer
{
       // source1.Union(source2, lambda)
        public static IEnumerable<TSource> Union<TSource, TComparable>(
           this IEnumerable<TSource> source1, 
           IEnumerable<TSource> source2, 
            Func<TSource, TComparable> keySelector)
        {
            return source1.Union(source2, 
               new LambdaEqualityComparer<TSource, TComparable>(keySelector));
       }
   }
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public static Dictionary<TKey, TValue> Distinct<TKey, TValue>(this IEnumerable<TValue> items, Func<TValue, TKey> selector)
  {
     Dictionary<TKey, TValue> result = null;
     ICollection collection = items as ICollection;
     if (collection != null)
        result = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>(collection.Count);
     else
        result = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
     foreach (TValue item in items)
        result[selector(item)] = item;
     return result;
  }

This makes it possible to select a property with lambda like this: .Select(y => y.Article).Distinct(x => x.ArticleID);

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I don't know of an existing class but something like:

public class MyComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
  private Func<T, T, bool> _compare;
  MyComparer(Func<T, T, bool> compare)
  {
    _compare = compare;
  }

  public bool Equals(T x, Ty)
  {
    return _compare(x, y);
  }

  public int GetHashCode(T obj)
  {
    return obj.GetHashCode();
  }
}

Note: I haven't actually compiled and run this yet, so there might be a typo or other bug.

share|improve this answer
1  
NB same issue as identified in comment on stackoverflow.com/questions/98033/… - CANT assume obj.GetHashCode() makes sense –  Ruben Bartelink Sep 15 '10 at 16:23

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