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I want to run a callback function just once, it should run if it removes all elements with a certain class, but for some reason the callback function runs times the number of elements that are removed, so thats not what i am looking for.

The code(form a plugin)

     $.plugin= {
        clear: function(str){

            $('.msg').fadeOut(200, function(){
                $(this).remove();
                if(typeof str.remove == 'function'){
                    str.remove.call(this);
                }           
            });
        } 
    }   
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we need to see more code. no idea what str refers to, among other things. –  maxedison Mar 21 '12 at 12:19
    
@maxedison is correct. One of the other things we need to know is the code contained in the .remove() method and how it reacts to the scope given to it (since you're specifically .call()ing it in scope of the removed element[s]). –  JAAulde Mar 21 '12 at 12:24
    
i have updated the code, this is the basic plugin part. I have placed the callback in the scope sinds it should only run if the elements are removed. The call back can contain some kind of fucntion used by a user. –  user759235 Mar 21 '12 at 12:29
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way would be to unset the function:

    $('.msg').fadeOut(200, function(){
        $(this).remove();
        if(typeof str.remove == 'function'){
            str.remove.call(this);
            str.remove = false;
        }           
    }); 

JAAulde might be right. The following code calls the callback with all .msg elements:

    var $msgs = $('.msg').fadeOut(200, function(){
        $(this).remove();
        if(typeof str.remove == 'function'){
            str.remove.call($msgs);
            str.remove = false;
        }           
    }); 

Note that $('.msg') is slow (especially in IE 7 and below) and should not be used without a tag. The reason is that they don't support document.querySelectorAll (as Mike G said)

share|improve this answer
    
Class selectors in general? Or what is slow? –  jgauffin Mar 21 '12 at 12:21
    
Why is it slow? Is it because of the lack of querySelectorAll? –  Mike G Mar 21 '12 at 12:21
1  
    
This may or may not work as intended. Since the OP is specifically calling .remove() in scope of this (as it exists inside the fadeOut callback), it now only runs once in scope of the first removed element. Without knowing the code in the .remove() callback we don't know if this is problematic. –  JAAulde Mar 21 '12 at 12:22
    
Ah never though of that, its referring to this...... –  user759235 Mar 21 '12 at 12:32
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This should do the task:

    var msgs = $('.msg').fadeOut(200);
    msgs.promise().done(function(){
        msgs.remove();
        if(typeof str.remove == 'function'){
            str.remove.call(this);
        }           
    });

See http://api.jquery.com/fadeOut/#callback-function and http://api.jquery.com/promise/. I'm not sure what this refers to in the done callback, so I made the reference sure with an additional variable.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont know the promise api, so i will take a look at it and see what it is. –  user759235 Mar 21 '12 at 13:45
    
It's the thing made to solve your problem :-) OK, no, the Deferred thing is a greater concept, but good to use here. –  Bergi Mar 21 '12 at 15:49
    
yes, it's a good use of promise(): +1 –  Fabrizio Calderan Mar 21 '12 at 17:21
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I suggest an alternative way: since you may need to use that function again later I prefer not overriding the function but calling it just once

var l = $('.msg').length;
$('.msg').fadeOut(200, function(){
    $(this).remove();
    if((--l === 0) && typeof str.remove == 'function'){
         str.remove.call(this);
    }           
}); 

if you have to execute both function once just write

var l = $('.msg').length;
$('.msg').fadeOut(200, function(){
    if (--l === 0) {
        $(this).remove();
        if(typeof str.remove == 'function'){
           str.remove.call(this);
        } 
    }           
}); 
share|improve this answer
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I have used the next piece of code(as Ghommey pointed my to the simple false statement).

 $.plugin= {
    clear: function(str){

        $('.msg').fadeOut(200, function(){
            $(this).remove();
            if(typeof str.remove == 'function'){
                str.remove.call(this);
                str.remove = false;
            }           
        });
    } 
}   
share|improve this answer
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