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In Python 3.2, I'm writing up a basic menu program, and when the option to quit is entered, the function is not ending. When quit is chosen, it ends the loop the rest of the script is in, and should terminate the script, but it isn't, for whatever reason? Am I missing an 'end' function that kills the script, or is the new Python Shell just buggy? Pretty sure this wasn't necessary in Python 2.7.

import random
choice = str(input("\nMenu:\n(I)nstructions\n(C)alculate blah\n(Q)uit\n>>>"))
while choice != "q" or choice != "Q":
    while choice != "i" and choice != "I" and choice != "c" and choice != "C" and choice != "q" and choice != "Q":
        print("Invalid menu choice.")
        choice = str(input("\nMenu:\n(I)nstructions\n(C)alculate blah\n(Q)uit\n>>>"))
    if choice == "i" or choice == "I":
        print("blahblah.")
        choice = str(input("\nMenu:\n(I)nstructions\n(C)alculate blah\n(Q)uit\n>>>"))   
    if choice == "c" or choice == "C":
        x = int(input("Please enter the number of x: "))
        while x < 0:
            x = int(input("Please enter the number of x: "))
        y = int(input("Please enter the number of y: "))
        while y < 0:
            y = int(input("Please enter the number of y: "))
        z = str(input("blah (B) or (P) z?: "))
        while z != "b" and z != "p" and z != "B" and z != "P":
            z = str(input("blah (B) or (P) z?: "))
        if z == "b" or z == "B":
            total = x*10 + y*6 + 0
            print("blah $", total, " blah ", x, " x and ", y, " y. blah!")
        #function that outputs the cost of premium z
        if z == "p" or z == "P":
            luck = random.randrange(1, 11, 1)
            if luck == 10:
                total = x*10 + y*6
                print("\nblah$", total, " blah z for ", x, " x and ", y, " y. blah!")
            #below is the normal function, for when the customer is not a lucky winner
            if luck != 10:
                total = x*12.50 + y*7.50
                print("blah $", total, " blah ", x, " x and ", y, " y. blah!")
        choice = str(input("\nMenu:\n(I)nstructions\n(C)alculate\n(Q)uit\n>>>"))
share|improve this question
3  
Nothing can be said without seeing the code. –  bereal Mar 21 '12 at 12:33
    
If you want the script to exit, you can use sys.exit(0), but yes, show the code if you want any more specific help. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 21 '12 at 12:38
    
pastebin.com/Ww4auw7E I couldn't think of an upload site I could trust, but here's a pastebin of the code. It's nothing at all complex, just trying to figure out what's going on here. –  Epidemic Mar 21 '12 at 12:48
    
Sorry about the vagueness of my question, I'm just confused, as I've never seen this behaviour before. I've indented all my code correctly, I've been through python documentation, my textbooks, google, et al. Couldn't find a solution. –  Epidemic Mar 21 '12 at 12:50
3  
@CharlesDuffy is suggesting that you post SSCCEs - "Short, self-contained, correct examples". –  Li-aung Yip Mar 21 '12 at 13:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your condition is wrong:

while choice != "q" or choice != "Q":    # this should be "and"!

always returns True, creating an infinite loop.

Also, you've got quite a convoluted bit of logic here. This can be simplified a lot:

import random
while True:
    choice = str(input("\nMenu:\n(I)nstructions\n(C)alculate blah\n(Q)uit\n>>>")).lower()
    if choice == "i":
        print("blahblah.")
        continue
    elif choice == "q":
        break
    elif choice == "c":
        while True:
            x = int(input("Please enter the number of x: "))
            if x >= 0: break
        while True:
            y = int(input("Please enter the number of y: "))
            if y >= 0: break
        while True:
            z = str(input("blah (B) or (P) z?: ")).lower()
            if z in "bp": break
        if z == "b":
            total = x*10 + y*6 + 0
            print("blah $", total, " blah ", x, " x and ", y, " y. blah!")
        #function that outputs the cost of premium z
        else:  # z must be "p"
            luck = random.randrange(1, 11, 1)
            if luck == 10:
                total = x*10 + y*6
                print("\nblah$", total, " blah z for ", x, " x and ", y, " y. blah!")
            #below is the normal function, for when the customer is not a lucky winner
            if luck != 10:
                total = x*12.50 + y*7.50
                print("blah $", total, " blah ", x, " x and ", y, " y. blah!")
    else:
        print("Invalid menu choice.")
        continue
share|improve this answer
    
pastebin.com/Ww4auw7E I couldn't think of an upload site I could trust, but here's a pastebin of the code. It's nothing at all complex, just trying to figure out what's going on here. –  Epidemic Mar 21 '12 at 12:48
    
Trying the code with an and instead –  Epidemic Mar 21 '12 at 13:07
    
Now that I've managed to get IDLE running again (It refuses to run code on occasion, not entirely sure why), it all works. Thank you very mych, @TimPietzcker –  Epidemic Mar 21 '12 at 13:46

One way to perform quit operations in Python is to throw a custom exception and catch that exception explicitly. Please correct me if I am wrong, AFAIK this doesn't put a big over-head on your python program. It could done as simple as the what I show below:

...
class QuitException(Exception);
...
def MyMenuProgram():
    ...
    ...
    ...

if __name__ == '__main__':
    try:
        MyMenuProgram()
    catch QuitException:
        pass
    catch Exception, e:
        raise
share|improve this answer
1  
sys.exit() already throws a SystemExit exception; why would you create a new one to do the same thing? –  Charles Duffy Mar 21 '12 at 13:01
    
Like I said, correct me if I am wrong :). Thanks for that info. I didn't know that. –  Vite Falcon Mar 21 '12 at 14:36

As @Tim answered, your loop condition is wrong.

while choice != "q" or choice != "Q":

Let's take a look at this, logically:

  1. if choice == "q", choice != "Q", loop condition evaluates to false or true, which is true
  2. if choice == "Q", choice != "q", loop condition evaluates to true or false, which is true
  3. if choice != "q" or "Q", loop condition evaluates to true or true, which is true

You need to change this loop condition to:

while choice != "q" and choice != "Q":

or

while choice.lower() != "q":
share|improve this answer
    
I would actually go further and suggest while choice[0].lower() != 'q' so that the user input quit is correctly handled. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 21 '12 at 13:10
    
@Li-aungYip, I don't believe the OP actually meant that the user would input 'quit', I think that was just poorly worded. However, in the case that that input is expected, you are entirely correct. –  Sam DeHaan Mar 21 '12 at 13:12
1  
Defensive coding is (nearly) never a bad idea. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 21 '12 at 13:19
    
@Li-AungYip and I have been chatting through an IRC net, we know each other IRL. Now that I've done the code to-spec, I'm going to do the task the way I would do it, without constraints. –  Epidemic Mar 21 '12 at 13:55

Edit: Redacted - input() is indeed the way to get user input in Py3k. Another of the glorious differences between Python 2.7 and Python 3.2.

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