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Hi fellow intellegent beings.

Im in the process of making a small query thing for a set of results of files.

public class f_results
    {
        public String name { get; set; }
        public DateTime cdate { get; set; }
        public DateTime mdate { get; set; }
        public DateTime adate { get; set; }
        public Int64 size { get; set; }
    }

So, I have a screen users can select what they want. At the moment I go through a filter system

    foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(totalresults.Find(fname.Text,true));
    if (fsize.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            Int64 sz = Int64.Parse(fsize.Text);
            List<f_results> y = (from p in foundfiles where p.size >= sz orderby p.size descending select p  ).ToList();
            foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(y);
        }
        catch
        { }
    }
    if (adate.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            List<f_results> y;
            DateTime test = DateTime.Parse(adate.Text);
            if ((adateop.Text) == ">")
            {
                y = (from p in foundfiles where p.adate >= test select p).ToList();
            }
            else
                y = (from p in foundfiles where p.adate <= test select p).ToList();
            foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(y);
        }
        catch
        { }
    }

    if (mdate.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            List<f_results> y;
            DateTime test = DateTime.Parse(mdate.Text);
            if ((mdateop.Text) == ">")
            {
                y = (from p in foundfiles where p.mdate >= test select p).ToList();
            }
            else
                y = (from p in foundfiles where p.mdate <= test select p).ToList();
            foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(y);
        }
        catch
        { }
    }

    if (cdate.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            List<f_results> y;
            DateTime test = DateTime.Parse(cdate.Text);
            if ((cdateop.Text) == ">")
            {
                y = (from p in foundfiles where p.cdate >= test select p).ToList();
            }
            else
                y = (from p in foundfiles where p.cdate <= test select p).ToList();
            foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(y);
        }
        catch
        { }
    }

At the end, I have my results the way I want them, but Im looking to process about 72tb of file data so, theres plenty of files and plenty of directories in my list (totalresults is a type results, which contains a list of files (f_results) and directories (results).. Find then itterates down and returns a massive list of f_results which match a given regex

Is there anyway to make my LinQ query, 1 query? Given not all options maybe used, eg they may just want files > x, or not used since.. or.. etc

I did consider making flags for the test, and so on, as its the test part thats the most important.. is that the better way, or is there better? or does it not matter much in the wash?

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To speedup large input processing you can use Parallel LINQ (PLINQ)? –  sll Mar 21 '12 at 12:39
    
Maybe, have you an example answer to my problem (while Im trying to poke it with sticks to see if I can do it other ways?) - btw example of sequential linq shows msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460680.aspx and it didnt really cover actual sequential linq queries in the way this problem is. –  BugFinder Mar 21 '12 at 12:42
    
I've read question one more time, so you want be able dynamically build single LINQ query depends on filter parameters specified as a string? or what is your main objective? –  sll Mar 21 '12 at 12:43
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could generate your filters beforehand, then apply them all at once - you would only have to iterate your initial enumeration once, something like this (shortened):

IEnumerable<f_results> foundfiles = new List<f_results>();
var filters = new List<Func<f_results, bool>>();

if (fsize.Text.Trim() != "")
{
    long sz = long.Parse(fsize.Text);
    filters.Add(x => x.size >= sz);
}

if (adate.Text.Trim() != "")
{
    DateTime test = DateTime.Parse(adate.Text);
    filters.Add(x => x.adate >= test);
}

foreach (var filter in filters)
{
    var filterToApply = filter;
    foundfiles = foundfiles.Where(filterToApply);
}
finalResults = new BindingList<f_results>(foundfiles);

More importantly don't call ToList() until you have processed all filters, otherwise you keep iterating through your full result list over and over.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the look of this! (See a comment I will add in a sec) –  BugFinder Mar 21 '12 at 12:58
1  
Thats very good. I would change the foreach loop to "foundfiles = foundfiles.Where(file => filters.All(filter => filter(file)))". –  Yorye Nathan Mar 21 '12 at 12:59
    
Thank you BrokenGlass, I do like your solution. I did find a way to do it as a single query - in case anyone cared, so have posted my own answer (see below), but, I am going to investigate this. I do like it. –  BugFinder Mar 21 '12 at 13:09
    
OK have plugged this in, and the only issue I had was BindingList<f_results>(foundfiles) wouldnt accept the foundfiles type without a .ToList() on the end.. What did I miss? –  BugFinder Mar 21 '12 at 13:17
    
That's right - BindingList only takes an IList<T> in its constructor, so you have to do that - didn't look that up at the time –  BrokenGlass Mar 21 '12 at 13:26
show 9 more comments

At least what can I suggest is to remove .ToList() invokes everywhere. As Linq has a deferred invocation, it will iterate once, even you have:

var foundfiles = from p in foundfiles where p.size >= sz select p ;
foundfiles = from p in foundfiles where p.mdate >= test select p

Upd. (in that case order by should be put after all filters)

But if you write:

var foundfiles = (from p in foundfiles where p.size >= sz orderby p.size descending select p).ToList() ;
foundfiles = (from p in foundfiles where p.mdate >= test select p).ToList();

It will iterate two times - and that might be a serious performace problem.

But I don't think the code will look much simplier if you make this code as a single query.

Also, why are you catching all exceptions? You shouldn't do that.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason the tolist was there originally was because it may not do other tests. The catch all was because its work in progress and right now, if it screws up I want it to continue on and try the rest :) Tidy will come later. –  BugFinder Mar 21 '12 at 12:57
    
You could have had only one ToList() in the end :) –  Archeg Mar 21 '12 at 13:15
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OK - I wanted to semi answer my own question..

I can combine to a single query, the following works very well.. Ideal? Possibly not!

Am going to now look at BrokenGlass' suggestion which looks nice and tidy!

   Boolean flag_size = false;
    Boolean flag_adate = false;
    Boolean flag_cdate = false;
    Boolean flag_mdate = false;
    Int64 sz=0;
    DateTime adatetest=DateTime.Now;
    DateTime cdatetest = DateTime.Now;
    DateTime mdatetest = DateTime.Now;
    String mop = mdateop.Text;
    String aop = adateop.Text;
    String cop = cdateop.Text;

    if (fsize.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            sz = Int64.Parse(fsize.Text);
            flag_size = true;
        }
        catch { }
    }

    if (adate.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            adatetest = DateTime.Parse(adate.Text);
            flag_adate = true;
        }
        catch
        { }
    }
    if (cdate.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            cdatetest = DateTime.Parse(cdate.Text);
            flag_cdate = true;
        }
        catch
        { }
    }
    if (mdate.Text.Trim() != "")
    {
        try
        {
            mdatetest = DateTime.Parse(mdate.Text);
            flag_mdate = true;
        }
        catch
        { }
    }


    foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(totalresults.Find(fname.Text, true));


            List<f_results> y = (from p in foundfiles.AsParallel() 
                                 where  (!flag_size || (flag_size && p.size >= sz)) &&
                                        (!flag_mdate || (flag_mdate && mop == ">" && p.mdate >= mdatetest) || (flag_mdate && mop == "< " && p.mdate >= mdatetest)) &&
                                        (!flag_adate || (flag_adate && aop == ">" && p.adate >= adatetest) || (flag_adate && aop == "< " && p.adate >= adatetest)) &&
                                        (!flag_cdate || (flag_cdate && cop == ">" && p.cdate >= cdatetest) || (flag_cdate && cop == "< " && p.cdate >= cdatetest))
                                 orderby p.size descending 
                                 select p).ToList();

            foundfiles = new BindingList<f_results>(y);
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