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I have a simple AJAX call, and the server will return either a JSON string with useful data or an error message string produced by the PHP function mysql_error(). How can I test whether this data is a JSON string or the error message.

It would be nice to use a function called isJSON just like you can use the function instanceof to test if something is an Array.

This is what I want:

if (isJSON(data)){
    //do some data stuff
}else{
    //report the error
    alert(data);
}
share|improve this question
    
Maybe using eval() if it returns undefined then, it's not JSON – MatuDuke Mar 21 '12 at 12:43
1  
4  
This has been solved here : stackoverflow.com/questions/3710204/… – Reinard Mar 21 '12 at 12:44
1  
check out the responses here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3710204/… – matt Mar 21 '12 at 12:45
2  
Thanks everyone, sorry I didn't find that other post before. – jeffery_the_wind Mar 21 '12 at 12:58
up vote 85 down vote accepted

Use JSON.parse

function isJson(str) {
    try {
        JSON.parse(str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Excellent answer. The OCD Coder is just telling me to ask you to edit the IsJson to isJson :P – Gaurav Ramanan Dec 27 '14 at 8:17
2  
Done done done :) – Bourne Dec 29 '14 at 11:42
1  
Exception handling shouldn't be used to do something expected. – luisZavaleta Aug 31 '15 at 5:57
1  
JSON.parse(1234) OR JSON.parse(0) OR JSON.parse(false) OR JSON.parse(null) all will not raise Exception and will return true !!. do not use this answer – Zalaboza Sep 12 '15 at 23:26
1  
@Zalaboza 1234, 0, false, and null are all valid JSON values. If you want a predicate that tests if the JSON represents an object you'll need to do a little more. – Michael Lang Nov 18 '15 at 23:15

If the server is responding with JSON then it would have an application/json content-type, if it is responding with a plain text message then it should have a text/plain content-type. Make sure the server is responding with the correct content-type and test that.

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There are probably tests you can do, for instance if you know that the JSON returned is always going to be surrounded by { and } then you could test for those characters, or some other hacky method. Or you could use the json.org JS library to try and parse it and test if it succeeds.

I would however suggest a different approach. Your PHP script currently returns JSON if the call is successful, but something else if it is not. Why not always return JSON?

E.g.

Successful call:

{ "status": "success", "data": [ <your data here> ] }

Erroneous call:

{ "status": "error", "error": "Database not found" }

This would make writing your client side JS much easier - all you have to do is check the "status" member and the act accordingly.

share|improve this answer
var parsedData;

try {
    parsedData = JSON.parse(data)
} catch (e) {
    // is not a valid JSON string
}

However, I will suggest to you that your http call / service should return always a data in the same format. So if you have an error, than you should have a JSON object that wrap this error:

{"error" : { "code" : 123, "message" : "Foo not supported" } } 

And maybe use as well as HTTP status a 5xx code.

share|improve this answer

Well... It depends the way you are receiving your data. I think the server is responding with a JSON formated string (using json_encode() in PHP,e.g.). If you're using JQuery post and set response data to be a JSON format and it is a malformed JSON, this will produce an error:

$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  url: 'test2.php',
  data: "data",
  success: function (response){

        //Supposing x is a JSON property...
        alert(response.x);

  },
  dataType: 'json',
  //Invalid JSON
  error: function (){ alert("error!"); }
});

But, if you're using the type response as text, you need use $.parseJSON. According jquery site: "Passing in a malformed JSON string may result in an exception being thrown". Thus your code will be:

$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  url: 'test2.php',
  data: "data",
  success: function (response){

        try {
            parsedData = JSON.parse(response);
        } catch (e) {
            // is not a valid JSON string
        }

  },
  dataType: 'text',
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Intelligent answer! – Marcio Mazzucato Mar 2 '14 at 23:47
    
unless, of course you are trying to parse the error text in the error function in the above example and not sure if it is JSON... – Kirby Nov 4 '15 at 23:01

I like best answer but if it is an empty string it returns true. So here's a fix:

function isJSON(MyTestStr){
    try {
        var MyJSON = JSON.stringify(MyTestStr);
        var json = JSON.parse(MyJSON);
        if(typeof(MyTestStr) == 'string')
            if(MyTestStr.length == 0)
                return false;
    }
    catch(e){
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

when using jQuery $.ajax() the response will have the responseJSON property if the response was JSON, this could be checked like this:

if (xhr.hasOwnProperty('responseJSON')) {}
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This is I suspect is really the answer that most people are looking for, probably even the OP – Kirby Nov 4 '15 at 23:05

You could try decoding it and catching the exception (native or json2.js):

try {
  newObj = JSON.parse(myJsonString);
} catch (e) {
  console.log('Not JSON');
}

However, I would suggest making the response always be valid JSON. If you get an error back from your MySQL query, simply send back JSON with the error:

{"error":"The MySQL error string."}

And then:

if (myParsedJSON.error) {
  console.log('An error occurred: ' + myParsedJSON.error);
}
share|improve this answer
function isJson(str) {
    try {
        JSON.parse(str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

This code is JSON.parse(1234) or JSON.parse(0) or JSON.parse(false) or JSON.parse(null) all will return true, so I rewrote code in this way:

function isJson(item) {
    item = typeof item !== "string"
        ? JSON.stringify(item)
        : item;

    try {
        item = JSON.parse(item);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }

    if (typeof item === "object" && item !== null) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Testing result:

isJson test result

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