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I declared a delegate:

public delegate void Del(string message);

Then i created a function that i want to add to the delegate:

public static void DelegateMethod(string message)
{
    System.Console.WriteLine(message);
}

Now I add the function to the delegate and call it:

Del handler = new Del( DelegateMethod);
handler("Hello World");
Console.Read();

Why when I drop the static from the DelegateMethod do I get an error?

Why does the function I delegate have to be static?

share|improve this question
    
in what scope is that function where you are adding the handler? –  Daniel A. White Mar 21 '12 at 12:59
    
duplicate - stackoverflow.com/questions/2298997/… –  scibuff Mar 21 '12 at 12:59
2  
Maybe you are calling the code from within a static class/function? Which I think is default for console applications in VS (your Main function will be static). Non static functions can only be accessed when you have an instance of the class containing them, which you do not –  musefan Mar 21 '12 at 13:00
    
@musefan - thanks , i dodn't notice i was inside a console main static method. –  Rodniko Mar 21 '12 at 13:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

why when i drop the "static" from the DelegateMethod i get an error?

Because you are writing this code inside a static method. Given the fact that you are using Console.Read I presume you have put this code inside the static void Main method of your console application. If you wanted to drop the static keyword from the method you will need an instance of the class containing this method. Like this:

class Program
{
    public delegate void Del(string message);

    public void DelegateMethod(string message)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(message);
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        Del handler = new Del(new Program().DelegateMethod);
        handler("Hello World");
        Console.Read();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

why when i drop the "static" from the DelegateMethod i get an error?

You didn't specify exactly what error you're confused by. I suspect the error you're confused by is the fact that this line will not compile if DelegateMethod is not static and you are writing the line of code in a static method in the containing class:

Del handler = new Del( DelegateMethod); 

The reason for this is because if you don't declare DelegateMethod as static, then you need an instance to refer to the method. Given that your code is likely being written in a static method for the containing class, there is no implicit this and thus you need an explicit instance. Assuming your containing class is named Foo:

Foo foo = new Foo();
Del handler = ne Del(foo.DelegateMethod);

See?

share|improve this answer
    
But it could also be that the code is located inside a static method, and therefore can only access other static methods. See? –  Øyvind Bråthen Mar 21 '12 at 13:13
    
Did you not read my answer carefully enough? I addressed that point. –  jason Mar 21 '12 at 13:58

You are mistaken about delegates needing to use static methods.

A method signature (return type and parameters - types, number and order) needs to match a delegate in order to be compatible with it.

From MSDN - Delegates (C# Programming Guide):

Any method from any accessible class or struct that matches the delegate's signature, which consists of the return type and parameters, can be assigned to the delegate. The method can be either static or an instance method.

(emphasis mine)


When using an instance method as the delegate target, you must refer to an actual instance:

public class MyClass
{
    public static void DelegateMethod(string message)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(message);
    }
}

var myClass = new MyClass();
Del handler = new Del(myClass.DelegateMethod);
share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter - care to explain? –  Oded Mar 21 '12 at 13:06
    
Looks like Jason went on a downvote spree here, imo because he does not understand what we are trying to explain. –  Øyvind Bråthen Mar 21 '12 at 13:09
    
@ØyvindKnobloch-Bråthen - Nope, I see what he meant, though he did get a bit trigger happy with the downvotes. –  Oded Mar 21 '12 at 13:12
    
But the fact that the code might be located inside a static method is not wrong, it's just that it's not the only option. –  Øyvind Bråthen Mar 21 '12 at 13:15
    
@ØyvindKnobloch-Bråthen - Yes, but the fact is that if the method is not static, you must register using an instance of the class. I believe that's the issue. –  Oded Mar 21 '12 at 13:17

It doesn't need to be static but a non-static method needs an instance. This is the very definition of non-static (instance) method. You can pass an instance method (and the instance) to a delegate like this:

Del handler = new Del(instanceVariable.DelegateMethod);

You can add instance methods to delegates in other instance method of the same class. It is assumed that the instance is this.

Keep in mind that in this way the instance will not be eligible for GC as long as the delegate instance lives. This is sometimes a reason for object leaks (some people call them memory leaks despite the fact that the leak is on a higher level and is different from C-style memory leak)

share|improve this answer
    
It can be either. –  Oded Mar 21 '12 at 13:02
    
Sorry I missed that. Either what? –  Stilgar Mar 21 '12 at 13:03
1  
You say: " It needs an instance". It doesn't. It can be an instance method or a static method. –  Oded Mar 21 '12 at 13:05
    
Oh I meant a non-static method needs an instance. I thought it was clear. I will clarify. –  Stilgar Mar 21 '12 at 13:06

Just a guess here. Is the method that contains this code:

Del handler = new Del( DelegateMethod);
handler("Hello World");
Console.Read();

Also static? In that case, DelegateMethod must be static as well, since you can't reference a non-static method from a static one.

share|improve this answer
    
Not true. He could have an explicit reference to an instance of the containing class. –  jason Mar 21 '12 at 13:04
1  
This is just as likely to be true as your answer. The above code might be put inside the main method of a console application for example. But hey, thanks for the downvote. –  Øyvind Bråthen Mar 21 '12 at 13:07
    
@ yvind : thank you , i don't know who downvoted this , but you have the right answer too, thank you. –  Rodniko Mar 21 '12 at 13:16
    
@Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen: I'm not talking about your guess. I'm talking about this statement: "you can't reference a non-static method from a static one." Plainly and simply, it is false. class F { void M() { } static void N() { var f = new F(); f.M(); } } is perfectly legitimate code. Here, we have a static method accessing a non-static method. –  jason Mar 21 '12 at 13:59
    
Jason that's not correct you have a static method accessing a member of an object. That member might or might not be a method (in this case it is but you can't see that from the call site) and the original code is not accessing a member of an object but a member of the class the code is in. In that context the statement is correct –  Rune FS Mar 21 '12 at 14:13

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