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I have created a C# console application that contains the namespaces System and System.Data

Additionally, I have added Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.

When I try to compile from command prompt it shows the error as:

SqlSmoDiscovery.cs(3,27): error CS0234: The type or namespace name 'Management' does not exist in the namespace 'Microsoft.SqlServer' (are you missing an assembly reference?) SqlSmoDiscovery.cs(4,27): error CS0234: The type or namespace name 'Management' does not exist in the namespace 'Microsoft.SqlServer' (are you missing an assembly reference?)

But it compiles from Visual Studio.

I am compiling from command prompt to have output as pure C# dll.

My Project in g:

then i navigate to G:\SqlDisc:> csc /target:library /r Micrsoft.SqlServer.Smo.Dll

SqlSmoDiscovery.cs but it shows the erroe as

error CS0006: Metadata file 'Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll' could not be found

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use the /r flag to reference additional assemblies from the command line.

csc /target:library /r:OtherAssembly.dll Foo.cs
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Before that plce the assemblies in the samefolder –  Cute Jun 11 '09 at 12:10
1  
not necessary to place the assemblies in the same folder at compile time. You can reference the assemblies by full path. At runtime, The assemblies need to be accessible: generally either in the local dir or in the GAC. Supposing you reference an assembly that is GAC'd, then you can specify it in the csc.exe command as something like c:\Windows\assembly\GAC\DataGridEx\1.0.1.0__852e0362e1c80f34\DataGridEx.dll. At runtime, the GAC'd assembly will be loaded just fine, without copying it anywhere. –  Cheeso Jun 11 '09 at 12:28

For more info, see the reference for the csc.exe tool.

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