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public class Person 
{
    public Int16 ID { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public List<Toy> Toys { get; private set; }
    public Person(Int16 id, string name, List<Toy> toys)
    { ID = id; Name = name; Toys = toys; } 
}
public class Toy
{
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public Person Owner { get; private set; }
    public Toy(Person owner, string name)  
    { Owner = owner; Name = name; }
}

The problem is with the Person CTOR. How to pass toys to the Person ctor? Toy needs Owner in the Toy ctor but that Owner has not yet been built yet.

I understand I can move Toys out of the Person CTOR and make the set public. Assume you only get the toys you are born with - the private set; has a purpose. And I understand that what I am asking for may not be possible.

Like anyone really cares but Toy only needs to know it Owners name so I may just modified Toys.

  public class Toy
  {
     private Person owner;
     private string ownerName;

     public string Name { get; private set; }
     public String OwnerName 
     { 
        get
        {
           if (!string.IsnullOrEmpty(ownerName)) return ownerName;
           elseif (owner != null) return owner.Name;
           else throw new exception("homelesstoy");
     }
     public Toy( string name, Person owner)  
     { 
         Name = name; Owner = owner;
         // new toy need to write it to DB 
     }
     public Toy( string name, string _ownerName)  
     { 
         Name = name; ownerName = _ownerName;
     }
  } 

In a whacked kind of way this is better. If my toy is is my car and they have my keys I don't want them to know my address. From my name the police can find me if the car is recovered.

share|improve this question
    
It is possible though not safe, if these both classes (Person and Toy) are members of another (container) class, let's say Family. It is possible to initialize references in container's constructor initializer list. –  Flot2011 Mar 21 '12 at 13:34
    
Does the Toy need to know it's owner? If the Toy is within the Person class, then by that logic you already know that the Toy is owned by that person. –  Matthew Mar 21 '12 at 13:43
    
Psst... The first assignment in the Person constructor is the wrong way around... fix it quick, and I’ll promise not to tell anyone ;-) –  Timwi Mar 21 '12 at 13:47
    
@Matthew There is a difference between does an owner know what toys he has and does the toy know its owner. And yes the toy need to know its owner. –  Blam Mar 21 '12 at 14:25
    
@Blam I understand the difference, however if the Toys are always accessed from using the Person object, then you already know its parent. –  Matthew Mar 21 '12 at 14:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why is the setter on Owner private? I can understand your point about the setter on Toys in the Person class.

If you removed that constraint, you could create a backing store (full property) and then loop the toys list in the Person constructor and do item.Owner = this.

public class Toy
{
    private Person _owner = null;
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public Person Owner { 
         get { return _owner; }; 
         set {
              if(_owner != null) throw new InvalidOperationException("No Stealing");
              _owner = value;
         }
    }
    public Toy(Person owner, string name)  
    { Owner = owner; Name = name; }
}

This would allow you to set Owner only once and subsequent calls to the setter would be exceptional. You wouldn't need to change the constructor, because you could still do:

Toy batman = new Toy(null, "Bruce");

One problem that I see is that this Toy-Owner relationship doesn't model the real world. Children are sometimes born with a slew of toys at their disposal, but toys are hardly ever manufactured with an immediate owner. Even after a toy is created and given to someone, it can be given to someone else.

I think the conceptual details are tripping you up logically.

edit: forgot the constructor...

public Person(Int16 id, string name, List<Toy> toys)
{ 
    id = ID; 
    Name = name; 

    foreach(Toy item in toys) {
        item.Owner = this;
    }

    Toys = toys; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Public set; on Toy Owner is OK. Cool solution. –  Blam Mar 21 '12 at 13:49
1  
internal is preferable. And the exception should be an InvalidOperationException. –  CodesInChaos Mar 21 '12 at 13:58
    
@Blam: This is not a very good solution because now you have to trust your client code never to change the Owner of a toy without also removing the toy from its owner’s list of toys. You should at least make the setter internal instead of public. –  Timwi Mar 21 '12 at 14:00
    
And yes, the exception should be InvalidOperationException, it should have a meaningful exception message, and all the code should also check for null values and throw ArgumentNullException accordingly. –  Timwi Mar 21 '12 at 14:02
1  
@CodeInChaos I hear you. What I am going to do is throw an exception if toys in Person ctor has an owner. If I enforce Toy must have an Owner in the Toy ctor then I also take a chance I pass a toys to the Person they don't own. A class can only do so much to protect itself and at some point the program logic needs to protect the classes. –  Blam Mar 21 '12 at 14:35

There are two possibilities I can think of:

  • If you want to keep the classes the way you have them now, you can create a Person with an empty list of Toys and add the toys afterwards, e.g.:

    var newPerson = new Person(id, name, new List<Toy>());
    var newToy = new Toy(newPerson, toyName);
    newPerson.Toys.Add(newToy);
    
  • If you want the list to be immutable after creation, then you should declare it as a ReadOnlyCollection<Toy> instead. In this situation, I recommend to have a static method that creates the whole lot in one operation:

    public class Person 
    {
        public Int16 ID { get; private set; }
        public string Name { get; private set; }
        public ReadOnlyCollection<Toy> Toys { get; private set; }
        public Person(Int16 id, string name, List<Toy> toys)
        { ID = id; Name = name; Toys = toys; } 
    
        public static Person CreateWithToys(Int16 id, string name,
            IEnumerable<string> toyNames) // or could use “params string[]”, too
        {
            var person = new Person(id, name, null);
            var toys = new ReadOnlyCollection<Toy>(
                toyNames.Select(toyName => new Toy(person, toyName)).ToList());
            person.Toys = toys;
        }
    }
    
    [...]
    
    var jimmy = Person.CreateWithToys(47, "Jimmy",
        new[] { "Rattle", "Batman costume", "Nuclear missile" });
    
    // or, if you used “params string[]” above,
    var jimmy = Person.CreateWithToys(47, "Jimmy",
        "Rattle", "Batman costume", "Nuclear missile");
    

    In more complex cases, you may have to make some of the setters internal instead of private so that such a static method can access what it needs to access.

share|improve this answer
    
I like your solution. –  Jim Schubert Mar 21 '12 at 14:09
    
How can I access the Toys directly? I find some Toys on the lawn and need to find their owner. Could the CreateWithToys pass Toys back out? –  Blam Mar 21 '12 at 17:30
    
@Blam: I’m sorry, I don’t understand your question. The first example already shows how you can access newPerson.Toys. In the second example you can just access jimmy.Toys. What exactly is unclear about the way this works? –  Timwi Mar 22 '12 at 3:23

Try creating a new Toy constructor and changing the Person setter of Toy to public;

public class Toy
{
    public Person Owner { get; set; }
    public Toy(string toyName);
}

public class Person
{
    Int16 id;
    string name;
    List<Toy> toys;
    public Person(Int16 id, string name, List<Toy> toys)
    { 
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
        this.toys = new List<Toy>();
        this.AddToys(toys);

    }

    private void AddToys(List<Toy> toys)
    {
        foreach (var toy in toys)
        {
            this.toys.Add(toy);
            toy.Owner = this;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see that you actually answered this first but I read the answer from Jim first. +1 and thanks –  Blam Mar 21 '12 at 13:50
    
glad to help, thanks. –  daryal Mar 21 '12 at 14:14

You cannot know the Toy owner if you haven't created the owner yet. You need to make Owner a public setter and change the Toy CTOR.

share|improve this answer
    
I get making Toys a public set in Person and removing it from the CTOR but I am not following changing Toy CTOR. I am not criticizing. I am confused and may be missing something. –  Blam Mar 21 '12 at 13:37
    
Remove Person owner as a parameter in the Toy CTOR. This will have to be assigned after you have a Person reference. –  SliverNinja Mar 21 '12 at 13:49

You could pass a Person instance to the Toy constructor, and have the new Toy add itself to the Person's Toys collection, instead of passing the Toys collection to the Person constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
This would also require changing the Person CTOR and removing the List<Toy> parameter since you can't create a Toy without an owner reference. Good suggestion though. –  SliverNinja Mar 21 '12 at 13:29

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