Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I wanted to develop a label which would show the text in a fade-in reveal type fashion. I expect that I need to handle the painting so that, essentially, a few more pixels are added to the right over each iteration. However, I've run into a snag and can't get any animation working. Here's what I have so far:

class RevealLabel : System.Windows.Forms.Label
{
    protected override void OnPaint(System.Windows.Forms.PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        const int GradWidth = 7;
        Rectangle r = new Rectangle(e.ClipRectangle.X, e.ClipRectangle.Y,
                                    GradWidth, e.ClipRectangle.Height);
        GraphicsPath p = new GraphicsPath();
        using (SolidBrush bs = new SolidBrush(this.ForeColor))
        {
            using (LinearGradientBrush bg = new LinearGradientBrush(new Rectangle(0, 0, GradWidth, e.ClipRectangle.Height), 
                                                                    this.ForeColor, 
                                                                    this.BackColor, 
                                                                    LinearGradientMode.Horizontal))
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < e.ClipRectangle.Width; i += GradWidth)
                {
                    r.X = i;
                    p.AddString(this.Text, this.Font.FontFamily, (int)this.Font.Style, this.Font.Size, 
                                r, StringFormat.GenericDefault);
                    e.Graphics.FillPath(bg, p);
                    e.Graphics.Flush();
                    long TickStop = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(0.2).Ticks;
                    while (DateTime.Now.Ticks < TickStop)
                    {
                        System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();
                    }
                    e.Graphics.FillPath(bs, p);
                }
            }
        }
        e.Graphics.Flush();
    }
}

Not sure if I'm even on the right track, as what this renders is just a horrible mess. A mess which isn't even gradually displayed to the screen, but rather seems to process everything in the background then updates the screen with just the end result.

So, my question is two-fold:

  1. What is the correct way to render the pixels/rectangle area I will be appending to the right on each iteration?

  2. How to get it to update to the screen on each draw, instead of just a lump upon completion?

(Note: I also tried painting in a background thread, but kept getting ArgumentException, I think because the Graphics object went out of a usable state soon after leaving the paint handler method.)

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using a timer:

public class RevealLabel : Label {
  private System.Windows.Forms.Timer revealTimer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();

  private int paintWidth = 0;
  private int paintIncrement = 7;

  public RevealLabel() {
    this.DoubleBuffered = true;
    revealTimer.Interval = 200;
    revealTimer.Tick += new EventHandler(revealTimer_Tick);
  }

  void revealTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    paintWidth += paintIncrement;

    if (paintWidth > this.ClientSize.Width) {
      revealTimer.Enabled = false;
    } else {
      this.Invalidate();
    }
  }

  protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e) {
    if (revealTimer.Enabled) {
      e.Graphics.Clear(this.BackColor);
      Rectangle r = new Rectangle(0, 0, paintWidth, this.ClientSize.Height);
      TextRenderer.DrawText(e.Graphics, this.Text, this.Font, r, Color.Black, Color.Empty, TextFormatFlags.Left | TextFormatFlags.VerticalCenter);
    } else {
      paintWidth = 0;
      revealTimer.Start();
    }
  }
}

I would probably inherit from a Panel instead of a Label since you are doing all of the drawing yourself anyway.

If you want the label to always animate, then move the this.Invalidate() call in the Tick event outside of the IF block.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Why do you recommend Panel over Label? I did that at first, but then found Panel was hiding the Text property, so I ended up simply inheriting from Control. Would Panel gain me anything? – Mike Guthrie Mar 21 '12 at 15:58
    
@GuthMD Nothing critical. Control would work to. Panels provide borders. – LarsTech Mar 21 '12 at 16:01
    
Does your solution have anything over what I ended up with? Such as, is it better to use Invalidate and always draw within the OnPaint handler? Is a Timer preferable to a ThreadPool? Is TextRenderer preferable to Graphics with clip set? – Mike Guthrie Mar 21 '12 at 16:14
    
@GuthMD "better" only you could answer. Timers are cheap. My code seems a little less complicated. Painting has to happen on the UI Thread anyway. Pick your poison, WinForms does not do animation well in either case. – LarsTech Mar 21 '12 at 16:27

After hammering away at this, I finally came around with the solution, here:

public class RevealLabel : System.Windows.Forms.Control
{
    private const int GradWidth = 5;
    private const int DrawDelay = 20;
    private int lcBackgroundPaintThreadId;

    protected override void OnPaint(System.Windows.Forms.PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Graphics.Clear(this.BackColor);
        if (this.DesignMode)
        {
            using (SolidBrush bs = new SolidBrush(this.ForeColor))
            {
                e.Graphics.DrawString(this.Text, this.Font, bs, 0, 0);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            System.Threading.ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(QueuePaintStep, this.ClientRectangle.X);
        }
    }
    private void QueuePaintStep(object state)
    {
        lcBackgroundPaintThreadId = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId;
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(DrawDelay);
        if (System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId == lcBackgroundPaintThreadId)
        {
            int x = (int)state;
            if (x < this.ClientRectangle.Width)
            {
                Rectangle r = new Rectangle(x, this.ClientRectangle.Y, GradWidth, this.ClientRectangle.Height);
                if (System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId != lcBackgroundPaintThreadId) return;
                using (LinearGradientBrush bg = new LinearGradientBrush(new Rectangle(0, 0, GradWidth, r.Height),
                                                                        this.ForeColor,
                                                                        this.BackColor,
                                                                        LinearGradientMode.Horizontal))
                {
                    this.Invoke(AsyncPaintCommon, this, bg, r);
                }
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(DrawDelay);
                if (System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId != lcBackgroundPaintThreadId) return;
                using (SolidBrush bs = new SolidBrush(this.ForeColor))
                {
                    this.Invoke(AsyncPaintCommon, this, bs, r);
                }
                if (System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId != lcBackgroundPaintThreadId) return;
                QueuePaintStep(x + GradWidth);
            }
        }
    }
    private delegate void AsyncPaintDelegate(RevealLabel l, Brush b, Rectangle r);
    private static Delegate AsyncPaintCommon = new AsyncPaintDelegate((RevealLabel l, Brush b, Rectangle r) =>
    {
        using (Graphics g = l.CreateGraphics())
        {
            g.SetClip(r);
            g.DrawString(l.Text, l.Font, b, 0, 0);
        }
    });
}

Welcoming any feedback.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.