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I work in a laboratory and we have to produce day to day Levey-Jennings charts and I was wondering if there is an easy way produce Levey-Jennings chart using R.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, I googled and didn't find one on CRAN, but maybe Levey-Jennings charts also go by another name? Anyway, here's a low tech one that you can tweak that I just made following the description on Wikipedia:

# make a data series
my.stat <- rnorm(100,sd=2.5)
# get its standard dev:
my.sd <- sd(my.stat)
# convert series to distance in sd:
my.lj.stat <- (my.stat - mean(my.stat)) / my.sd

plot(1:100, my.lj.stat, type = "o", pch = 19, col = "blue", ylab = "sd", xlab = "observation",
    main = paste("mean value of", round(mean(my.stat),3),"\nstandard deviation of",round(my.sd,3)))

# a low tech L-J chart function:
LJchart <- function(series, ...){
    xbar        <- mean(series)
    se          <- sd(series)
    conv.series <- (my.stat - xbar) / se

    plot(1:length(series), conv.series, type = "o", pch = 19, col = "blue", ylab = "sd", xlab = "observation",
        main = paste("mean value of", round(xbar,3), "\nstandard deviation of", round(se,3)), ...)
}

LJchart(rnorm(100,sd=2.5))

enter image description here

[Edit: adding a shaded region for the 1 sd zone, inspired by Seth's comment]

This one also has more flexible args I guess, but I'm not too experienced with the use of ... when different functions share the ..., but trying it out with this example it doesn't break:

LJchart <- function(series, ...){
    xbar        <- mean(series)
    se          <- sd(series)
    conv.series <- (my.stat - xbar) / se

    plot(1:length(series), conv.series, type = "n", ...)
    rect(0, -1, length(series)+1, 1, col = gray(.9), border = NA)
    lines(1:length(series), conv.series, ...)
    points(1:length(series), conv.series, ...)
    if (! "main" %in% names(list(...))) {
        title(paste("mean value of", round(xbar,3), "\nstandard deviation of", round(se,3)))
    }
}

LJchart(rnorm(100,sd=2.5), xlab = "observations", ylab = "sd", col = "blue", pch = 19)

enter image description here

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This looks like a good response to me, but I would add some horizontal lines for the population sd with something like: lines(h=c(sd,-sd),lty=4) –  Seth Mar 21 '12 at 16:23
    
OK, I did something similar in the edit. I figured the asker could just take this shell and customize it for his/her needs. Another change might be to make the mean and sd as optional arguments too, in case they are known parameters, but to calculate them in the function from series if not specified. I'll leave that to the asker. –  tim riffe Mar 21 '12 at 17:31
    
Wow, I didn't expect such an elaborate response! This is exactly what I was looking for. I appreciate the efforts, thank you. –  user1283559 Mar 23 '12 at 16:01
    
+1! Note that you can use scale to scale the data with the mean and the standard deviation. See my answer to this question. I like ggplot2 better for these kinds of graphs because it works on a little higher abstraction level. The code needed in ggplot2 for this graph is less than the code you need. –  Paul Hiemstra Apr 16 '12 at 11:49
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For plotting I prefer ggplot2 over standard graphics. Therefore, here is my solution using ggplot2:

theme_set(theme_bw())

dat = data.frame(value = rnorm(100,sd=2.5))
dat = within(dat, {
    value_scaled = scale(value, scale = sd(value))
    obs_idx = 1:length(value)
  })

ggplot(aes(x = obs_idx, y = value_scaled), data = dat) + 
  geom_ribbon(ymin = -1, ymax = 1, alpha = 0.1) +
  geom_line() + geom_point()

Which yields:

enter image description here

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For the uninitiated: Levey-Jenning's chart is a chart used to manage quality-control samples, especially in a medical laboratory. The Y axis is no. of SDs, and X axis should be timestamps.

Modified from Tim Riffe's answer from above. This should be more suited for laboratory use.

 # LJchart
 # modified from Tim Riffe's answer on StackOverflow
 #
 # Version history:
 # 1.1      Added support for timestamp on each datapoint 
 #      Added rectangle to delineate the 2SD boundary, limited the scope to 3 SD
 # 
 # Usage: 
 # LJchart( [Series of values], [Series of timestamp], [Manufacturer set mean],  [Manufacturer set SD] )
 # e.g. 
 # creatinineLV1 <- c(52, 51, 48, 51, 42, 48, 46, 44, 45, 51, 51, 
 #                    46, 50, 45, 52, 41, 58, 45, 44, 44, 42, 47, 
 #                    45, 43, 48, 43, 47, 47, 48)
 # timeCRLV1 <- c(41267.41106, 41267.51615, 41267.64512, 41267.683, 
 #           41268.32005, 41269.55979, 41269.62026, 41269.88109, 
 #           41270.20442, 41270.5897, 41270.61914, 41270.66589, 
 #           41270.76311, 41271.43517, 41271.58534, 41271.69562, 
 #           41271.75682, 41272.43492, 41272.51768, 41272.53, 
 #           41272.59527, 41273.38759, 41273.46314, 41273.49382, 
 #           41273.6311, 41273.66563, 41273.78007, 41273.82463, 
 #           41273.88547)  
 # > LJchart(creatinineLV1, timeCRLV1, 50, 6)

 LJchart <- function(series1, series2, meanx, sdx){
    xbar        <- mean(series1)
    se          <- sd(series1)
    conv.series <- (series1 - meanx) / sdx

    plot(series2, conv.series, type = "n", ylim=c(-3,+3))

    rect(0, -2, max(series2)+1, 2, col = gray(.9), border = NA)
    rect(0, -1, max(series2)+1, 1, col = gray(.8), border = NA)

    lines(series2, conv.series)
    points(series2, conv.series)
    title(paste("calculated mean value of", round(xbar,3), 
     "\ncalculated standard deviation of", round(se,3)))
}
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... not finished ... ? –  Ben Bolker Dec 31 '12 at 16:19
    
this is a function to be called on commandline... –  bubu Dec 31 '12 at 19:19
    
sorry, I think my browser scrolling was temporarily on the fritz. –  Ben Bolker Dec 31 '12 at 19:34
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I'm working on developing some scripts for this type of chart> Check the script. The main data in "value" vector.

All comments "##/#" may be erased.

value<-rnorm(100,1000,200) ##create list of numbers, "scan()" may be used for real observations
nmbrs<-length(value) ## determine the length of vector
obrv<-1:length(value) ## create list of observations
par(xpd=FALSE)
sd1<-sd(value[1:20])*1 ## 1 standart deviation
sd2<-sd(value[1:20])*2 ## 2 standart deviations
sd3<-sd(value[1:20])*3 ## 3 standart deviations
usd1<-mean(value)+sd1 ## upper limit
lsd1<-mean(value)-sd1 ## lower limit
lsd2<-mean(value)-sd2 ## lower limit
usd2<-mean(value)+sd2 ## upper limit
usd3<-mean(value)+sd3 ## upper limit
lsd3<-mean(value)-sd3 ## lower limit

## ploting the grid
plot(obrv,value,type="n",xlab="Observations",ylab="Value",ylim=c(lsd3-sd1,usd3+sd1))
abline(h=mean(value),col=2,lty=1)
abline(h=usd1,col=3,lty=3)
abline(h=lsd1,col=3,lty=3)
abline(h=usd2,col=4,lty=2)
abline(h=lsd2,col=4,lty=2)
abline(h=usd3,col=6,lty=1)
abline(h=lsd3,col=6,lty=1)


## 20 first values for L-G chart for QC limits
for (i in 1:20) 
{
points(obrv[i],value[i],col="black")
}
lines(obrv[1:20],value[1:20],col="red")


## if over mean - "red", under mean - "blue"
for (i in 21:nmbrs) 
{
points(obrv[i],value[i],col="blue")
segments(obrv[i-1],value[i-1],obrv[i],value[i],col="blue")
}

# 1s points - blue; 2s points - red
#if (value[i]<usd1 || value[i]>lsd1) points(obrv[i],value[i],col="blue")
#if (value[i]>usd1 || value[i]<lsd1) points(obrv[i],value[i],col="red")

#12s violation rule
#if (value[i]>usd1 || value[i]<usd1) text(30, usd3, "12s violation")
#if (value[i]>usd1 || value[i]<usd1) text(30, usd3, "12s violation")
#segments(obrv[i-1],value[i-1],obrv[i],value[i],col="blue")
#if (value[i]>usd1) break
#}


#legend placement - might be omited
#legend(1,min(value)-sd1*0.2,bg=8,c("mean","sd1","sd2","sd3"),lty=c(1,3,2,1),lwd=c(2.5,2.5,2.5,2.5),col=c(2,3,4,6),cex=0.8)
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Looks like a lot of code for this kind of graph. You might want to check out a plotting library like ggplot2 which can more effectively do these kinds of plots. See my answer to this question for example. –  Paul Hiemstra Apr 16 '12 at 11:47
    
Paul, the first 20 values are the QC ones and required for estimation of sd (1,2,3) and determinations of upper/lower limits. I can not post pictures due to low reputation points, but if you try my code, you'll see the first 20 values are in different color. As well as there are accepted line styles for this type of graph. I'm sure the ggplot2 is very flexible, but the coding gives you a lot of flexibility. I have to look deeper into ggplot2, but it seems very impressive. Thank you. –  Aybek Khodiev Apr 17 '12 at 5:52
    
You could make this more readable by not defining quite so many variables. Why not calculate the standard deviation once and just multiply it as needed, and same with your means for the usd's and lsd's. Also, the h (and col, lty) arguments in abline is vectorized, so you could draw all those lines in one call. –  Gregor Sep 3 '12 at 10:56
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