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I have an external app with a number of arguments I need to run programmatically. It's all working fine in a command prompt but when I try to launch the same arguments from a .Net app, it fails. I've now learned it's the use of '&&' that is making the mess at the moment that some of the arguments has.

To simplify my question, say I have something like this working in my command prompt:

"Notepad.exe C:\tmp\tmp.txt && Notepad.exe c:\tmp\tmp2.txt"

This works fine. My attempt to achieve the equivalent looks like this:

string app = "Notepad.exe";
string args = @"C:\tmp\tmp.txt && Notepad.exe c:\tmp\tmp2.txt";
using (Process process = new Process())
{
    process.StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo(app, args)
    {
        UseShellExecute = false,
        CreateNoWindow = false,
    };

    process.Start();
    process.WaitForExit();
}

But this obviously does not work. Is my only option to split the arguments by '&&' and run them one by one or is there a way to make this work?

share|improve this question
    
Command line metacharacters are interpreted by the command intepreter. Your code just passes the whole command line to Notepad, and Notepad thinks that you merely passed it a very strange file name. –  Raymond Chen Mar 21 '12 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

string args = @"C:\tmp\tmp.txt && Notepad.exe c:\tmp\tmp2.txt";

The reason is that \ starts an escape sequence, meaning the text you pass as arguments is really this:

C:    mp    mp.txt && Notepad.exe c:    mp    mp2.txt

\t is the escape sequence for a tab.

The only difference between my code and your is the @ in front of the string. This tells the compiler to interpret the string literally. If you need to know more, the name for this is "verbatim string".


UPDATE:
You can use this code:

string app = "cmd";
string args = @"/c Notepad.exe C:\tmp\tmp.txt && Notepad.exe c:\tmp\tmp2.txt";
using (Process process = new Process())
{
    process.StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo(app, args)
    {
        UseShellExecute = false,
        CreateNoWindow = true,
    };

    process.Start();
    process.WaitForExit();
}

It will use cmd.exe to execute the compounded command. I changed CreateNoWindow to true to not show the command line window, but only the notepad windows.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes, forgot the escaping but it still doesn't work. Updated my question. –  BlueVoodoo Mar 21 '12 at 14:13
    
@BlueVoodoo: Please see update. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 21 '12 at 14:16
    
This won't achieve what he's aiming for, because 'process' will contain the cmd which can be terminated before the two notepads are. He must run notepad twice and wait twice. –  Yorye Nathan Mar 21 '12 at 14:30
    
@YoryeNathan: I don't understand your comment, but it is certainly working, I tested it. cmd exits after the second notepad has been closed. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 21 '12 at 14:32
    
Thanks @YoryeNathan - The example worked for me. The idea is to wait for the first process to terminate before the second one is launched. This is how it behaves if I run it manually. –  BlueVoodoo Mar 21 '12 at 14:35

Have a method:

   private void RunAndWait(string app, params string[] args)
   {
       foreach (string arg in args)
       {
           Process proc = new Process
                          {
                              StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo(app, arg)
                                              {
                                                  UseShellExecute = false,
                                                  CreateNoWindow = true
                                              }
                          };

           proc.Start();
           proc.WaitForExit();
       }
   }

And then the code very is simple:

   string app = "Notepad.exe";
   string args1 = @"C:\tmp\tmp.txt";
   string args2 = @"C:\tmp\tmp2.txt";
   RunAndWait(app, args1, args2);

And to generalize for more than two files (args):

   string[] args = new string[] {@"C:\tmp\tmp.txt", @"C:\tmp\tmp2.txt", ...}
   RunAndWait(app, args);
share|improve this answer
    
-1: This code doesn't do, what the OP wants! It starts both Notepad instances at the same time, not one after the other. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 21 '12 at 14:34
    
@DanielHilgarth Updated my answer to run each notepad at a time. He would still have to run them separately to wait for them to exit correctly, so doing it in one line using the cmd is a bad idea. –  Yorye Nathan Mar 21 '12 at 14:39
    
Removed downvote. Care to explain, why it is a bad idea, because it certainly works. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 21 '12 at 14:41
    
Process.Start() will return the instance of the cmd itself. It can be shutdown manually even though it has no window, and then the program would think the notepads are killed when they really aren't. It is simply wrong to check if one parent process is alive as a condition whether his children are alive or not (as in this matter, when the cmd is terminated manually, the notepads won't be closed, because the cmd isn't really their "parent"). –  Yorye Nathan Mar 21 '12 at 14:44
    
That's really only a theoretical concern. His code isn't killing the returned process, so this case isn't relevant for him. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 21 '12 at 14:51

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