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I've got a number of classes that inherit from Item<T>.

Each class has a Create() method that I would like to move up into Item<T>.

Yet the following code gets the error "Cannot create an instance of the variable type 'T' because it does not have the new() constraint":

T item = new T(loadCode);

What is the correction syntax to do this?

public abstract class Item<T> : ItemBase
{

    public static T Create(string loadCode)
    {
        T item = new T(loadCode);

        if (!item.IsEmpty())
        {
            return item;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new CannotInstantiateException();
        }
    }
share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's not possible. You can only use new() constraint to force existence of a constructor.

A workaround is to take a Func<InputType, T> (Func<string,T> in your example) delegate as input parameter that'll create the object for us.

public static T Create(string loadCode, Func<string,T> construct)
{
    T item = construct(loadCode);

    if (!item.IsEmpty())
    {
        return item;
    }
    else
    {
        throw new CannotInstantiateException();
    }
}

and call it with: Item<T>.Create("test", s => new T(s));

share|improve this answer
    
isn't the OP simply asking how he can get that piece of code compiled without errors? – Philippe Leybaert Jun 11 '09 at 11:45
1  
@activa: There's simply no way to make that work directly. The idea is fundamentally unsupported in C#. – Mehrdad Afshari Jun 11 '09 at 11:46
    
You're right. I misread the question. Slap me – Philippe Leybaert Jun 11 '09 at 11:48

Correction: I made a slight mistake, you need another constraint on T for this solution, see code below.

You can only put a constraint on for parameterless constructor, but maybe something like this could work:

public interface ILoadable
{
    void Load(string loadCode);
}

public abstract class Item<T> : ItemBase
    where T : ILoadable, new()
{
    public static T Create(string loadCode)
    {
        T item = new T();
        item.Load(loadCode);

        if (!item.IsEmpty())
        {
            return item;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new CannotInstantiateException();
        }
    }
}

And then you implement the constructor code that depends on the loadCode in the override to Load(...) in the descendant classes.

share|improve this answer
1  
But the compiler has no way of knowing that Load() exists on T. You'd need an additional constraint (an interface for example) – Philippe Leybaert Jun 11 '09 at 11:52
    
You are right... I got distracted by the wording of the question into thinking that T was of type Item<T>... duh. – jerryjvl Jun 11 '09 at 12:17
    
Unfortunately, this approach doesn't work if T will be used as framework-provided classes, e.g. subclasses of Exception, which can only assign the property (i.e., their Message) in the constructor... – C.B. Nov 19 '13 at 2:44

You could use Activator.CreateInstance to create the instance, although it does not do any compile-time checks.

share|improve this answer
1  
The first idea doesn't work. A derived class can have a separate set of constructors. Activator.CreateInstance will work but it doesn't force anything at compile time so the code might perfectly compile and surprisingly fail at runtime which is not a good thing. – Mehrdad Afshari Jun 11 '09 at 11:52
    
Right. It would have to call base(ItemBase), but the derived class itself wouldn't have to have that specific ctor. My fault, will change that. – Groo Jun 11 '09 at 11:52

The error is because the compiler cannot rely on the fact that the generic class T has anything other than the default constructor.

You can overcome this using reflection as follows:

ConstructorInfo c = typeof(T).GetConstructor(new Type[] { typeof(string) });
T t = (T)c.Invoke(new object[] { loadCode });

As your T type must therefore have a constructor which takes a string then I would also restrict your class so that it must inherit from a class with a constructor:

class Item<T> : ItemBase where T : BaseClassWithConstructor
share|improve this answer
1  
As I said in another comment, this works but is unsafe. And your restriction doesn't mean anything for a derived class. A base class will have a parameterless constructor and the derived classes might not have one. – Mehrdad Afshari Jun 11 '09 at 12:03

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