Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a project list and want to display only projects that have tasks. Is it possible to use a condition with count on a has_many relation?

# get my project list
Project.includes(:tasks).where(...)

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project

Currently i am doing this through a loop but i dont think that this is the right way.

share|improve this question
1  
I have asked similar question here. Hope it can help you too. –  ZelluX Mar 21 '12 at 14:22
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you are already eager loading the tasks for a project you can use the following statement to get the projects with tasks.

# get my project list
Project.includes(:tasks).where("tasks.id IS NOT NULL")

This works because includes uses LEFT OUTER JOIN.

On the other hand if you don't want to eager load the tasks, you can use joins as it uses INNER JOIN.

Project.joins(:tasks).where(...)
share|improve this answer
add comment

The includes directive often indicates to simply eager-load those associations, not JOIN them in database-wise, so you can't really do conditions here without some additional work.

One way that scales well is to use the counter_cache feature of the association so you always have a numerical count of the number of tasks. You can even add an index on these to further improve the performance of your query.

The alternative is to try and work backwards from the tasks table, perhaps like:

Project.where('id IN (SELECT DISTINCT project_id FROM tasks)')

Presumably you have an index on project_id in your tasks table to make that a fairly inexpensive operation.

share|improve this answer
    
you don't need counter_cache for this. Since the includes directive is being used the underlying SQL generated uses LEFT OUTER JOIN. It is a matter of doing a not null check. The scenario is much simpler if user uses joins. I have discussed this in my answer below. –  Harish Shetty Mar 21 '12 at 16:35
    
I'm of the mind that it's better to not load things you don't need. If a project has a kabillion tasks, loading them all without restriction could crush the app. –  tadman Mar 21 '12 at 19:00
    
I understand, that is the general pre-caution one has to take while opting for eager loading. –  Harish Shetty Mar 21 '12 at 19:36
add comment

If the question is as simple as the title suggests, not sure why this wouldn't do the trick:

Project.joins(:tasks)

Unless specified otherwise, the join will be an inner join, and thus exclude any results whose projects do not have tasks, so perhaps that's all you need ... if you want to display all projects with tasks.

If you have some condition (for example, projects whose status is active) you can also specify a condition like

Project.joins(:tasks).where("status = 'active')

Or have I missed something?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.