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I'm using NetworkStream.BeginRead/EndRead for asynchronous reads from a socket.

However, NetworkStream.EndRead() is sometimes returning 0 (ie. 0 bytes were read from the socket) which I thought indicated the socket was closed but this is not true because if I keep calling BeginRead() eventually I do receive more data.

Is this not a proper loop to continuously read data from a socket/NetworkStream?

void BeginContinousRead()
{
  // Start the continous async read
  mStream.BeginRead(mDataBuffer, 0, mDataBuffer.Length, new AsyncCallback(ProcessNetworkStreamRead), null);
}

private void ProcessNetworkStreamRead(IAsyncResult result)
{
  // This will sometimes be zero?!
  int bytesRead = mStream.EndRead(result);

  // Continue reading more data and call this callback method again over and over, etc.
  mStream.BeginRead(mDataBuffer, 0, mDataBuffer.Length, new AsyncCallback(ProcessNetworkStreamRead), null);
}

According to MSDN, I should use the NetworkStream.DataAvailable property to determine if more data is available on the socket but this will be FALSE even though more data might arrive at a later date.

For example, according to MSDN this should be my callback:

private void ProcessNetworkStreamRead(IAsyncResult result)
{
  // This will sometimes be zero?!
  int bytesRead = mStream.EndRead(result);

  while (mStream.DataAvailable)
    mStream.BeginRead(mDataBuffer, 0, mDataBuffer.Length, new AsyncCallback(ProcessNetworkStreamRead), null);
}

...but this doesn't work properly because DataAvailable becomes FALSE and then my continous read stops and never reads any more data.

What is the correct asynchronous approach to continue reading data until the other end closes the socket or I choose to close the socket?

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1 Answer 1

Instead of checking the bytesRead or the DataAvailable property to check if the socket is closed, wrap the call to BeginRead and catch an IOException. That should then tell you if the socket is closed.

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Thanks - What would the proper loop then be? Keep calling BeginRead() and let EndRead() return 0 bytes over and over? –  SofaKng Mar 21 '12 at 15:24
1  
I've just tested this by telneting into my listening socket, and for some reason an exception NEVER gets thrown even after I disconnect my telnet client... –  SofaKng Mar 21 '12 at 16:01
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