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I have two files, that look like this:

File 1 (2 columns):

ID1 123
ID2 234
ID3 232
ID4 344
...

File 2 (>1 million columns)

ID2 A C ...
ID3 G T ...
ID1 C T ...
ID4 A C ... 
...

I want to add the values from column 2 of file 1 based on the ID to file 2 as the second column. So the merged file should look like this:

ID2 234 A C ...
ID3 232 G T ...
ID1 123 C T ...
ID4 344 A C ... 
...

So exactly the same as file 2 (same order of rows), but with the added 2nd column. The IDs are the values of the first column (present in both files). File 1 has more rows/IDs than file 2. All IDs from file 2 are in file 1, but not all IDs from file 1 are in file 2.

Does anyone know how to do this under unix/bash? Many thanks!

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How many rows are there? (Is it feasible to load all of file 1 into memory?) –  ruakh Mar 21 '12 at 14:37
    
File 1 has close to 4 million rows, file 2 has tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of rows (I actually have several files in the format of file 2, so I have to do this multiple times (= for each file)) –  Abdel Mar 21 '12 at 14:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
$ join <(sort file1) <(sort file2)
ID1 123 C T ...
ID2 234 A C ...
ID3 232 G T ...
ID4 344 A C ...

If you want keep the order of file2

$ join -1 1 -2 2 <(sort file1) <(cat -n file2 | sort -k2,2) | sort -k3,3n | cut -d' ' -f1-2,4-
ID2 234 A C ...
ID3 232 G T ...
ID1 123 C T ...
ID4 344 A C ...
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Thanks! This seems to work, except that for some reason he starts a new line after each value of the added second column... (so each row is now 2 rows, with the second row starting at "C T ...") Any idea why that might be? –  Abdel Mar 21 '12 at 14:55
1  
@Abdel, I guess it is because there is an extra \r at the end of the line. If you use dos2unix to "process" file1 first to remove those \r, then it should be OK. –  Raymond Tau Mar 21 '12 at 14:58
    
Thanks, that worked! –  Abdel Mar 21 '12 at 15:14
    
After double checking, he didn't do it for all rows unfortunately... The merged file consists of less rows than the original file 2 (about 5000 rows less). And this is not because there are IDs missing in file 1 that are in file 2 (I checked it manually in SPSS, and there are only 55 that should be missing instead of 5000)... any idea how this might happen? Btw, I also get the message "join: file 1 is not in sorted order" during the process.. could that have something to do with it? –  Abdel Mar 21 '12 at 15:33
    
@Abdel, yes, join requires sorted files. –  glenn jackman Mar 21 '12 at 15:52

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