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I'm trying to replicate from foo.bar import object using the __import__ function and I seem to have hit a wall.

from glob import glob is easy: glob = __import__("glob",glob)or glob = __import__("glob").glob

The problem I'm having is that I am importing from a package (i.e. bar) and I want the script in the package to be the source of the import.

So what I'd like is something like

string_to_import = "bar"
object = __import__("foo",string_to_import).object

But this just imports the __init__ in the foo package.

How can this be done?

EDIT: When I use the obvious, only the __init__ is called

__import__("foo.bar")
<module 'foo' from 'foo/__init__.pyc'>
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What about the straightforward __import__("foo").bar.object? –  Alfe Mar 21 '12 at 14:57
    
because bar needs to be a variable –  jdborg Mar 21 '12 at 15:23
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The import statement will return the top level module of a package, unless you pass the following additional arguments.

_temp = __import__('foo.bar', globals(), locals(), ['object'], -1) 
object = _temp.object

See Python docs on __import__ statement

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or, object = __import__('foo.bar', globals(), locals(), ['object'], -1).object –  jdborg Mar 22 '12 at 11:40
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Rather than use the __import__ function I would use the getattr function:

model = getattr(module, model_s)

where module is the module to look in and and model_s is your model string. The __import__ function is not meant to be used loosely, where as this function will get you what you want.

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Yep, so I import foo, then getattr(foo,"bar").object works fine. Thanks –  jdborg Mar 21 '12 at 14:57
    
Actually, I've just realized that this only works after I've already imported using the normal method –  jdborg Mar 21 '12 at 15:08
    
Hmm, you should be able to import foo (if you know it's value already and don't need to import it dynamically as a string value) with the normal import statement. Once the module is imported you can import anything within its directory as a string using getattr. import foo bar = getattr(foo, 'bar') object=bar.object –  Eric H. Mar 21 '12 at 15:28
    
But bar isn't an attribute, it's a script within the folder foo. –  jdborg Mar 21 '12 at 15:30
    
Ok I see. import sys. bar = sys.modules['foo.bar'] object=bar.object or if 'object also needs to imported from string, object=getattr(bar, 'object') –  Eric H. Mar 21 '12 at 15:56
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__import__("foo").__dict__["bar"].object
getattr(__import__("foo"), "bar").object  # alternative version with suggestion above
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