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The trouble I'm having is I have the following structured code. Essentially I would like the UL to take up the top 37 pixels of the page, and the div that follows it to take up the remaining area of the browser's window.

So if I resize the window, and make it taller, the purple background of the div should fill the entire bottom area. The problem I'm having is that if I set height to 100% on the purple DIV, it creates a scroll bar because its creating the DIV to 100% of the size of the parent, not 100% of the remaining area after the UL has been accounted for.

<body style="padding:0; margin:0;border-width:1px;border-color:Gray; border-style:dashed; position:absolute; left:0px; right:0px; top:0px; bottom:0px;">
<div style="margin:0; padding:0; left:0px; right:0px; top:0px; bottom:0px;margin:0;height: 100%;border-width:1px;border-color:Green; border-style:dashed;">
    <div style="margin:0; padding:0; height:100%;border-width:1px;border-color:Red; border-style:dashed;">
        <ul style="padding:0;margin:0;border-width:1px;border-color:Blue; border-style:solid; left:0px; right:0px; top:0px; bottom:0px;">
            <li >Test Item</li>
        </ul>

        <div style="height:100%;background-color:Purple;">Test Content</div>
    </div>
</div>

EDIT: I should note that I'm doing my testing in the latest version of Chrome, but I see the same behavior in IE9 and the latest version of Firefox.

share|improve this question
    
set the overflow: auto on the parent div for starters. you can also set border: 1px solid red (or any color) on each div as a trouble shooting tool. –  Brian Mar 21 '12 at 14:52
1  
That's the default behavior of a division... Why are you using position: absolute on the <body> element? Did you mean to use min-height: 100%? –  animuson Mar 21 '12 at 14:54
    
I don't know, even if I take it out and use min-height, the purple does not extend to the full remaining height of the window. And Brian's suggestion didn't change anything either. –  987 S Mar 21 '12 at 15:00
    
Setting overflow:hidden on the body and height:100% on the body and the <HTML> tag seemed to "fix" it. But is that the right way and will it break later? –  987 S Mar 21 '12 at 15:02
    
Which downward versions of IE do you have to serve? –  HerrSerker Mar 21 '12 at 15:28

2 Answers 2

I think you should wrap them using a div. Example

<div id="wrapper" style="height: 100%;position:relative;">
<ul>
    <li >Test Item</li>
</ul>

<div style="height:100%;position: absolute; left:0; top:0;padding-top: 39px; z-index: -1">Test Content</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, because there is still a scroll bar for no (apparent) reason. –  987 S Mar 21 '12 at 17:26

You could do it with absolut positioning

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/HerrSerker/zXV7V/

<div class="wrap">
    <div class="top">Top</div>
    <div class="content">Content</div>
</div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

html,body {
    height: 100%;
}
.wrap {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}
.wrap .top {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    height: 37px;
    width: 100%;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    border: 1px solid gray;
}
.wrap .content {
    position: absolute;
    top:37px;
    bottom: 0px;
    width: 100%;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    border: 1px solid black;

}
​
share|improve this answer
    
Where does the UL go? –  987 S Mar 21 '12 at 17:22
    
I tried replacing the first div with a UL and it doesn't work. –  987 S Mar 21 '12 at 17:24
    
It's only a proof of concept –  HerrSerker Mar 21 '12 at 17:48

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