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I'm trying to make a subclass of UITableViewCell, which simply contains a UILabel Property "nameLabel" and a UILabel Property "statusLabel".To dequeue the cells correctly, I implemented the cellForRowAtIndexPath: method like this:

PS: The text of statusLabel is from twitter API, so I have to send the size of it to [[UILabel alloc]initWithFrame:]

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"StatusCellView";
    StatusCellView *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:
                        CellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = [[StatusCellView alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    }
    for (UIView *subView in cell.contentView.subviews) {
        [subView removeFromSuperview];
    }
    if (![cell viewWithTag:kNameLabelTag]) {
        //init the nameLabel and [cell.contentView addsubview:nameLabel]
    }
    if (![cell viewWithTag:kStatusLabelTag]) {
        //init the statusLabel and [cell.contentView addsubview:statusLabel]
    }

    return cell;

As you can see, this works well when the data is not so large. But my question is :

  • I think removing and adding the subview repeatedly will make the performance bad. It's a rude way...
  • I can implement the same function without subclassing UITableViewCell. Is there any way to make use of the subclass?
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Yes, there is one use of the subclass: you must be doing the cell setup in the subclass' initializer, and not in the table view's delegate method. –  user529758 Mar 21 '12 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't really understand why you have to remove them...this seems like a perfectly reasonable way of doing it:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"StatusCellView";
StatusCellView *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:
                    CellIdentifier];
if (cell == nil) {
    cell = [[StatusCellView alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    //init the nameLabel and [cell.contentView addSubview:nameLabel];
    //init the statusLabel and [cell.contentView addsubview:statusLabel]
}
else {
    UILabel *nameLabel = [cell viewithTag:kStatusLabelTag];
    nameLabel.frame = newFrame;
    nameLabel.text = newText
    //etc, etc, etc
}
return cell;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I've tried the way you give. Let me give you more code cell.nameLabel = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRect(10.0,2.0,300.0,statusTextSize.height) and CGSize statusTextSize = [self.unsureText sizeWithFont:font constrainedToSize:CGSizeMake(150.0f, 1000.0f) lineBreakMode:UILineBreakModeCharacterWrap] @borrrden –  studyro Mar 21 '12 at 16:03
    
If use the code you gave, the reuse of the cell will be incorrect. When I scroll down the TableView and scroll back, the label is messy... –  studyro Mar 21 '12 at 16:05
    
So, I remove and reinit them every time. But it seems not a good code. –  studyro Mar 21 '12 at 16:07
    
What do you mean "messy"? –  borrrden Mar 21 '12 at 23:39
    
Forgive me for my poor English, I mean, the content view of cells isn't in the correct frame. For example, when I scroll the table view, the title is on the position of subtitle's, which happens in the coming cell. –  studyro Mar 22 '12 at 0:57

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