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I am not sure if this is possible in Ruby, but in case someone knows a good solution.

I'd like to change the structure of a block, replacing particular nodes in it with other code structures. Much like macros.

For example, say I have an unevaluated code block

some_method do
  foo
  bar
end

Then I define some_method like

def some_method(&block)
   ...
end

In some_method, I really would like to replace "bar" in block with something else, e.g. with baz.

I want to do the replacement w/o evaluating the block, because ultimately I am passing the block around to other places.

Doable? or no?

I can think of fairly complicated answers: e.g. I can pass the block around with an additional closure that defines replacement for bar, and uses method_missing and continuation to replace bar with baz when bar is evaluated. But is there a simpler way?

Thanks.

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I hope you have a really good reason for doing this instead of simply monkey-patching bar to do what you want. This kind of heavy metaprogramming can lead to your application behaving very unpredictably from the point of view of an outside developer. –  tadman Mar 21 '12 at 15:18
1  
@tadman: and monkey-patching is friendly to outside developer? I realize it's outside the norm, but once the block is changed, it's no different than any other ruby code block, so in fact it's very nicely abstracted. Macros are useful concepts. –  Overclocked Mar 21 '12 at 15:33
2  
Have you read Macros, Hygiene, and Call By Name in Ruby and looked at Reg's rewrite and ick gems? I don't think they work with 1.9 since the rely on sexp/parse-tree which were tied into the 1.8 ast interpreter. But some pretty interesting work to bend ruby into a more capable lisp and more capable functional language. –  dbenhur Mar 21 '12 at 16:17
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4 Answers

Ruby doesn't have dynamic scoping and doesn't have macros, so unless you wrap the block in a function taking bar as a parameter, and pass that function around, I don't think you can substitute code like that. You can use eval of course, but I wouldn't recommend it=)

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This is the simplest way i can think of:

class Base
  def some_method(&block)
     self.instance_eval(&block)
  end
  def foo; puts 'foo'; end
  def bar; puts 'bar'; end
end

class Replacement < Base
  def foo; puts 'baz'; end
end

Base.new.some_method do
  foo
  bar
end

Replacement.new.some_method do
  foo
  bar
end

output:

foo
bar
baz
bar
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This kinda works, but instance_eval changes self so any instance vars referenced by the block wont be on the self in scope when it's written, but on the instance of Replacement you made. Foot-gun! Also he wanted to not eval block immediately, but to pass it along so the change was effective when ultimately executed later. –  dbenhur Mar 21 '12 at 16:00
    
that is why i made Replacement a subclass of Base, otherwise it wouldn't work like this. You could also execute the block later, where's the difference? But i guess what @Overclocked asks for is hardly possible. –  p11y Mar 21 '12 at 16:10
    
but the subclassing only helps with method dispatch, ivars are still bound to a particular instance –  dbenhur Mar 21 '12 at 16:21
    
now i see what you mean. well, you could also just define the replacement methods directly on the instance and call the ivars through self.ivar... anyway, this whole thing seems like a bad idea :) –  p11y Mar 21 '12 at 17:00
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Do aliases and Procs help?

def foo; p 'foo'; end
def bar; p 'bar'; end
def sm(&block)
    @@Block = Proc.new {
        alias :oldbar :bar
        def bar; p 'baz'; end  #redefine
        block.call
        alias :bar :oldbar  #restore
    }
    yield    #prints foo,bar
end


sm do 
    foo 
    bar
end


def later(&block)
    yield
end
def delayedEx
    later { @@Block.call}
end

delayedEx  #prints foo,baz
bar  #prints bar (unchanged)

This prints "foo bar foo baz bar", i.e: bar does something different in the block, but retains its original behavior outside.

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def some_method(a_proc=Proc.new{puts "Bar"}, &block)
  a_proc.call
  yield
end

p1 = Proc.new{puts "Baz"}

some_method{puts "a block"}
some_method(p1){puts "a block"}
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In what way does this address the OP? your proc call has no effect on the binding or execution of the block –  dbenhur Mar 21 '12 at 16:26
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