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Given

IEnumerable<T> first;
IEnumerable<T> second;

and that both first and second are ordered by a comparer Func<T, T, int> that returns 0 for equality, -1 when the first is "smaller" and 1 when the second is "smaller".

Is there a straight-forward way using LINQ to merge the two sequences in a way that makes the resulting sequence also ordered by the same comparer?

We're currently using a hand-crafted algorithm that works, but the readability of a straight-forward LINQ statement would be preferable.

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2  
possible duplicate of Most efficient algorithm for merging sorted IEnumerable<T> –  Jon Mar 21 '12 at 15:34
    
Have you extracted your hand-crafted algorithm into a separate method? That would be the simplest way to improve readability. –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 15:42
2  
If you like readability (over performance) then: var both = first.Union(second).OrderBy(comparer); –  George Duckett Mar 21 '12 at 15:43
    
@Jon: I already know about that "the most efficient algorithm" thread. Was just hoping that LINQ would help with readability. :) –  Johann Gerell Mar 21 '12 at 15:48
2  
@GeorgeDuckett: That method will discard duplicates (probably not desired). var both = first.Concat(second).OrderBy(comparer); is probably what you want. –  Ron Warholic Mar 21 '12 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could define an extension method for this. Something like

public static IEnumerable<T> MergeSorted<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second, Func<T, T, int> comparer) 
{
    using (var firstEnumerator = first.GetEnumerator())
    using (var secondEnumerator = second.GetEnumerator())
    {

        var elementsLeftInFirst = firstEnumerator.MoveNext();
        var elementsLeftInSecond = secondEnumerator.MoveNext();
        while (elementsLeftInFirst || elementsLeftInSecond)
        {
            if (!elementsLeftInFirst)
            {
                    do
                    {
                        yield return secondEnumerator.Current;
                    } while (secondEnumerator.MoveNext());
                    yield break;
            }

            if (!elementsLeftInSecond)
            {
                    do
                    {
                        yield return firstEnumerator.Current;
                    } while (firstEnumerator.MoveNext());
                    yield break;
            }

            if (comparer(firstEnumerator.Current, secondEnumerator.Current) < 0)
            {
                yield return firstEnumerator.Current;
                elementsLeftInFirst = firstEnumerator.MoveNext();
            }
            else
            {
                yield return secondEnumerator.Current;
                elementsLeftInSecond = secondEnumerator.MoveNext();
            }
        }
    }
}

Usage:

var s1 = new[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 };
var s2 = new[] { 2, 4, 6, 6, 6, 8 };

var merged = s1.MergeSorted(s2, (a, b) => a > b ? 1 : -1).ToList();

Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", merged));

Output:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 8, 9
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A solid piece of single-pass code - thanks! –  Johann Gerell Apr 10 '12 at 15:42
    
Parameter comparer could be allowed to be null (optional parameter) and set to Comparer<T>.Default.Compare if it is null. –  springy76 Nov 6 at 18:29

I think, converting the first enumerable to list and adding second item to this list then calling sort will do the trick.

        IEnumerable<int> first = new List<int>(){1,3};
        IEnumerable<int> second = new List<int>(){2,4};

        var temp = first.ToList();
        temp.AddRange(second);


        temp.Sort(new Comparison<int>(comparer)); // where comparer is Func<T,T,int>
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5  
This implementation is O(n) in extra storage, O(n lg n) in time typical case and O(n^2) in time worst case. There is an algorithm which is both O(1) in extra storage and O(n) in time. –  Eric Lippert Mar 21 '12 at 16:20

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