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I'd like to detect duplicate files in a directory tree. When two identical files are found only one of the duplicates will be preserved and the remaining duplicates will be deleted to save the disk space.

The duplicate means files having the same content which may differ in file names and path.

I was thinking about using hash algorithms for this purpose but there is a chance that different files have the same hashes, so I need some additional mechanism to tell me that the files aren't the same even though the hashes are the same because I don't want to delete two different files.

Which additional fast and reliable mechanism would you use?

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The chance of a hash collison is seriously slim. If you want 100% certainty beyond that, you can just compare the full file contents - it'll be rare enough performance doesn't matter. –  delnan Mar 21 '12 at 16:02
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@delnan: This is not true. The chances for a collision of a specific file are low, for a large files collections - the chances are much higher - see the birthday paradox as an example. The probability of two people out of 23 having the birthday at the same day is 23. The chances for a collision grows exponentially as the collection gets bigger. –  amit Mar 21 '12 at 16:04
    
@amit I'm aware of the birthday paradoxon, it's also why I don't say "the odds are so low you shouldn't bother checking". Also, my gut feeling says the chances are so low for two files, it would take hundreds or thousands of files to have collision odds >1. But yeah, I'd better check that first. The table in that article (regarding Birthday attack) seems to confirm this. If I'm reading it right, a perfect 64-bit hash requires 1.9 × 10^8 (= 190 million) files even for a 0.1% collision chance. –  delnan Mar 21 '12 at 16:15

4 Answers 4

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Calculating hash will make your program run slow. Its better you also check the file size. All the duplicate file should have same file size. If they share same file size apply hash check. It'll make your program perform fast.

There can be more steps.

  1. Check if file size is equal
  2. If step 1 passes, check if first and last range of bytes (say 100 bytes) are equal
  3. If step 2 passes, check file type,
  4. If step 3 passes, check the hash at last

The more criteria you add the more faster it'll perform and you can avoid the last resort (hash) this way.

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You can also compute two hashes (different hashes!) of the file and consider them the same only if both hashes are equal. –  Vatine Mar 21 '12 at 16:12
    
@vatine You mean if(md5("some_file")==sha1("some_file")) they are same? –  shiplu.mokadd.im Mar 21 '12 at 16:17
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No, if md5("filea") == md5("fileb") and sha1("filea") == sha1("fileb") you have a much stronger guarantee of filea and fileb bein identical than if you only use one hash function. –  Vatine Mar 21 '12 at 16:20
    
@Vatine in that case I think using a single hash with longer bit. Say sha256 or sha512 –  shiplu.mokadd.im Mar 21 '12 at 16:33
    
You can still get a collision (admittedly, you'd need 2^128 or 2^256 files before that hits 50%), but with two different hashes, that's much less likely. –  Vatine Mar 22 '12 at 10:31

The hash solution is fine - you will just need to do one of the collisions mechanisms for dealing with 2 elements that are hashed to the same value. [chaining or open addressing].

Just iteratively add elements - if your implementation detected that there is a dupe - it will not add it to the hash set. You will know that an element is a dupe if the size of the set was not changed after trying to add the element.

Most likely that there is already an implementations for this kind of data structure, in your language - for example a HashSet in java and unordered_set in C++.

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If you use a hash algo like SHA-1 or better yet SHA-256 or higher, I really doubt if you will get the same hash value for two different files. SHA is a cryptographic hash function, and is used in version control systems like Git. So you can rest assured that it will do the job for you.

But if you still want additional checks in place, you can follow these two steps.
1) Parse the headers - this is a really tough cookie to crack since different formats might have different header lengths
2) Have some sanity checks - file size, read random file positions and try to check if they are the same

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This is the typical output of a md5sum:

0c9990e3d02f33d1ea2d63afb3f17c71

If you don't have to fear intentionally faked files, the chances to for a second, random file to match is

1/(decimal(0xfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff)+1)

If you take the file size into account as additional test, your certainty increases, that both files fit. You might add more and more measurement, but a bitwise comparison will be the last word in such a debate. For practical purpose, md5sum should be enough.

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This is not true. The chances for a collision of a specific file are low [1/(decimal(0xfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff)+1)], for a large files collection - the chances are much higher - see the birthday paradox as an example. The probability of two people out of 23 having the birthday at the same day is 23. The chances for a collision grows exponentially as the collection gets bigger. –  amit Mar 21 '12 at 16:03
    
the chances to for a second, random file to match is means exactly that: One file, and a second file. How many files do you have? How big is the chance of a collision for 10 000 files? 100 000 files? –  user unknown Mar 21 '12 at 16:45
    
I agree to that, but I doubt the claim For practical purpose, md5sum should be enough. is also true - especially if we are talking about distributed [and huge] file system... It could be true - but this claim should be proven. –  amit Mar 21 '12 at 16:48
    
@amit: There are about 50M possible pairs of 10k files, and 50G pairs from 100k files. Divide the number by 340 282 366 920 938 463 463 374 607 431 768 211 456 which is 16^32, the size of the md5sum spectrum, and compare the probability of a collision with the probability to get the file size check wrong. To any other bug in checking. –  user unknown Mar 21 '12 at 17:30

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