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I know I can use tc and netem to do

tc qdisc add dev eth0 root netem loss 50%

This would drop 50% of packets in all of eth0 traffic. However, I would like to specify a protocol (UDP, TCP etc), so only packets of this protocol would be dropped.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use iptables instead - it has a probability option that should allow you to do this, for example:

iptables -A INPUT -m statistic -p tcp --mode random --probability 0.5 -j DROP

Adjust the various values to match the desired traffic/direction/probability.

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all OK. But when i try: iptables -A OUTPUT -m statistic -p tcp --mode random --probability 0.5 -j DROP my code on Python2.7 return to me: socket.error: [Errno 1] Operation not permitted –  Xaver Apr 26 '12 at 9:16
    
any chance you are not running with the right permissions? Also, not really sure what python has to do with it - can you run from the command line and confirm that it works there? –  Adam C Apr 26 '12 at 10:46
    
there is no probability that i run that with wrong permissions (i only have root user in my system and i run all commands by root). tc qdisc add dev eth0 root netem loss 50% command only work with my output traffic. so i use tc for output traffic and iptables for input traffic. –  Xaver Apr 27 '12 at 4:15

This is an annoying feature of iptables. Even though the docs say that DROP silently drops the packet on the floor, it still tells the calling program, causing sendmsg (or whatever) to return setting errno to ENETUNREACH or EPERM. There doesn't seem to be a feature "no really silently drop the packet and don't tell anyone about it".

I have found the following workaround, however: if the packets are going to be leaving your local machine, you can set the TTL to 0 in the mangle table:

iptables -t mangle -A SomeChain -m ttl -j TTL --ttl-gt 0 --ttl-set 0

I have successfully used this to deal with a DoS reflection attack.

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