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I have a problem with class in Python. I'd like to know how to call an object created in a module in other python program.

Let me show an example. I have these object in "class_module.py" file

def objectCase():
    object1 = class_name("object1")
    object2 = class_name("object2")
    object3 = class_name("object3")

def other_objectCase():
    other_object1 = class_name("other_object1")
    other_object2 = class_name("other_object2")
    other_object3 = class_name("other_object3")

With from class_module.py import *, I think if I use the objectCase() function, I have in my program these object (object1, object2, object3) and, if I use otherobjectCase() function, I call all otherobject. But this is not true. What is the problem?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are creating local variables inside the functions. They are lost as soon as the function returns. If you need these objects later on, return them to the caller

return object1, object2, object3

and bind names to them in the calling code

a, b, c = objectCase()
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How Can I keep the same name present in function (so "object1", "object2" instead "a", "b") automatically? –  Sniper Wolf Mar 21 '12 at 16:23
    
@SniperWolf: Essentially, no. –  Sven Marnach Mar 21 '12 at 17:10

Take a look at to documentation for Scopes and Namespaces, the names object1, object2, and object3 are local to the objectCase() function, so you will not be able to access them from your main module as your code is currently written.

The most typical way of accomplishing what you want would be to return those variables:

def objectCase():
    object1 = class_name("object1")
    object2 = class_name("object2")
    object3 = class_name("object3")
    return object1, object2, object3

And then when you call it assign the returned values back to the same names:

object1, object2, object3 = objectCase()

There isn't a good way to keep the same names as the local variables automatically, but returning a dictionary may be appropriate here. Instead of returning object1, object2, object3 you could return {'object1': object1, 'object2': object2, 'object3': object3}, and then the calling function could do something like this:

result = objectCase()
# do something with result['object1'], result['object2'], or result['object3']
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1  
I have the same question reading this answer. How Can I keep the same name present in function (so "object1", "object2" instead "a", "b") automatically? –  Sniper Wolf Mar 21 '12 at 16:26

If you want object1, ... to be in the module's namespace you have several options:

object1, object2, object3 = objectCase()

or, if you don't want to deal with the assignments there, you can use the global keyword in the function:

def objectCase():
    global object1, object2, object3
    object1 = class_name("object1")
    object2 = class_name("object2")
    object3 = class_name("object3")

or, you can skip the function altogether and just have this as top-level code:

object1 = class_name("object1")
object2 = class_name("object2")
object3 = class_name("object3")
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global will actually not work here, because this function is being imported from another module and global variables are global to the module, not across modules. –  Andrew Clark Mar 21 '12 at 18:32
1  
global will make the objects global in module they are created in, then from module import * will be able to pick them up. –  Ethan Furman Mar 21 '12 at 18:37
    
True, but doing from module import * every time you call a function from module that updates global variables would be a pretty messy program structure. –  Andrew Clark Mar 21 '12 at 21:38
1  
@F.J, using global is messy ;) . On re-reading his question, I think you and Sven have the correct interpretation of what he was asking -- I was thinking he wanted his objects in the module he defined the functions in. –  Ethan Furman Mar 21 '12 at 21:46

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