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Another annoying one for me but probably something simple.

I have a number of possible where clauses for a query based on user input, my question is how can I add these programmatically?

For instance:

wherequery = @"WHERE fieldname = @p_FieldName AND ";
if (txtValue.textLength > 0){
    wherequery += "fieldname2 = @p_FieldName2 AND ";
}
query = @"SELECT * FROM tabe" + wherequery;
sql = connection.CreateCommand();
sql.CommandText = query;

How would I go about doing the parameters for that? I've tried ArrayLists, Dictionaries and a few other methods but can't find a way of doing it. Ideally I'd want to do something like this:

SqlParameter[] sqlparams;
wherequery = @"WHERE fieldname = @p_FieldName AND ";
if (txtValue.textLength > 0){
    wherequery += "fieldname2 = @p_FieldName2 AND ";
    sqlparams.Parameters.Add("@p_FieldName2 ", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtValue.text;
}
query = @"SELECT * FROM tabe" + wherequery;
sql = connection.CreateCommand();
sql.CommandText = query;
sql.Parameters.Add(sqlparams);
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've made a small alteration to your code, which should hopefully point you in the right direction:

    sql = connection.CreateCommand();    
    wherequery = @"WHERE fieldname = @p_FieldName ";
    sql.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@p_FieldName ", "some value for fieldname"));

    if (txtValue.textLength > 0){
        wherequery += " AND fieldname2 = @p_FieldName2 ";
        sql.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@p_FieldName2 ", txtValue.text));
    }
    query = @"SELECT * FROM tabe" + wherequery;

    sql.CommandText = query;
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1  
You've changed the parameters of the Add method? I'm mainly a web dev guy, but shouldn't this be AddWithValue? And how would this change anything? –  Curt Mar 21 '12 at 16:34
    
Sorry, missed out the instantiation of a SqlParameter object. I've made an appropriate edit. –  Andy Holt Mar 21 '12 at 16:36

Use a Dictionary<string,object> where the string portion is the key and the object portion is the value.

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Why don't you use an ORM like Linq to SQL/Enties, Nhibernate, ... ?

Because generating your SQL statement manually is a little bit obsolete !

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Rather than programmatically adding the parameters, add them all, but include NULL conditions. For example:

SELECT * FROM tabe
WHERE fieldname=@p_FieldName 
AND (@p_FieldName2 IS NULL OR fieldname2=@p_FieldName2)

sqlparams.Parameters.Add("@p_FieldName2 ", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = null;
if (txtValue.textLength > 0){
    sqlparams.Parameters("@p_FieldName2").Value = txtValue;
}

Here, if the text length of txtValue is 0, then the @p_FieldName2 parameter is set to null.

Then in the SQL Query the following will ignore the fieldname2=@p_FieldName2 if the value is NULL:

@p_FieldName2 IS NULL OR 
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interesting idea but this would cause additional load on the server to process the query, and this server is already on its last legs :( –  Neo Mar 21 '12 at 16:29
3  
Voted up, I don't see how this would add additional load. If anything, it's more efficient. You've got a single query with one execution plan, rather than several permutations that must be parsed. –  Dan A. Mar 21 '12 at 16:36
    
ok suppose you have 30 possible clauses, thats 30 null values, also what if you need to use the same field in different ways like a date field? –  Neo Mar 21 '12 at 16:42
    
Well, in that case, maybe dynamic parameters is a better route for you. It's certainly more flexible if you've got complex logic about how parameters get used. –  Dan A. Mar 21 '12 at 16:54

Check out the answer to this question. Should be applicable to your problem.

How to handle dynamic sql parameters

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This looks pretty good to me. –  Yatrix Mar 21 '12 at 17:07
    
Honestly, I would change this whole structure to use a stored proc that does the same thing. Create all the possible parameters, of which there can be only as many columns as the table has. Then, in the WHERE clause use WHERE column1 = ISNULL(@column1, column1) AND column2 = ISNULL(@column2, column2) etc. But that's getting outside the scope of the question. –  Nick Vaccaro Mar 21 '12 at 19:20

If you have a bunch of different possible fields to filter on, you're not getting away from coding them all, in one manner or another.

You could create a class to handle the string building. I stole this idea from work. =)

In pseudocode, it'd basically look like this:

Class WhereObj
{
  //whatever container you want to use to hold the params
  //you could also create a params class and have a list of param objects
  //it'd basically be a constructor and two properties

  private Params(,)

  Public void AddParam(fieldname, value)
  //adds param to Params

  Public string ToSQLString() 
  //loops params and builds string (use stringbuilder!)
  //ex: "where FirstName= 'Neo' and MatrixSequelsSucked = 'true'"
}

This should be a real easy class to code - probably under 50 lines. You should definitely create your own object to handle this, especially if you have to do this in multiple places. You could just write a function if it's only in one place, but I think it's a little cleaner to separate it out into an object.

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