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I have read some document about this. but I don't really understand it. Please give me some advice, and please give me some example to describe ( I think this is the one that I need to understand)

thanks :)

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I have read that document, it doesn't help me imagine what difference. (maybe because it's a hard-read document) – user1204873 Mar 21 '12 at 16:47
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If you read that article and still don't understand, do you have specific questions about it? It's hard to respond to "please explain Foo to me," "here's what it means," "I don't get it" without specifics as to which parts you don't get. – yshavit Mar 21 '12 at 17:02
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Weak Reference :

A weak reference, simply put, is a reference that isn't strong enough to force an object to remain in memory. Weak references allow you to leverage the garbage collector's ability to determine reachability for you, so you don't have to do it yourself.

Soft Reference :

A soft reference is exactly like a weak reference, except that it is less eager to throw away the object to which it refers. An object which is only weakly reachable (the strongest references to it are WeakReferences) will be discarded at the next garbage collection cycle, but an object which is softly reachable will generally stick around for a while.

Phantom Reference :

A phantom reference is quite different than either SoftReference or WeakReference. Its grip on its object is so tenuous that you can't even retrieve the object -- its get() method always returns null. The only use for such a reference is keeping track of when it gets enqueued into a ReferenceQueue, as at that point you know the object to which it pointed is dead.

This text was extracted from: https://weblogs.java.net/blog/2006/05/04/understanding-weak-references

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That is indeed very good webpage. – Trismegistos Oct 2 '13 at 10:52
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While everything in this answer looks correct, it also looks to me like there may be an error on the linked webpage. The Javadoc for package java.lang.ref and that for PhantomReference suggest that an object is not garbage collected until after it is no longer "phantom reachable", implying that (unlike SoftReference) a PhantomReference must be dequeued before the object it refers to can be garbage collected...and its being enqueued does not indicate that the associated memory has been freed. – Theodore Murdock Aug 20 '15 at 1:21
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For the record, I would much rather live in a world where that blog post is correct. – Theodore Murdock Aug 20 '15 at 1:22

I have gone through the responses and frankly I believe that a little bit of light should be shown.

Java provides two different types/classes of Reference Objects: strong and weak; then, weak Reference Objects can be further divided into soft and phantom. Let's go per point.

Strong Reference Object

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

It's the default type/class of Reference Object, if not differently specified: builder is a strong Reference Object. This kind of reference makes the referenced object not eligible for GC, this means: whenever an object is referenced by a chain of strong Reference Objects, it cannot be garbage collected.

Weak Reference Object

WaekReference<StringBuilder> weakBuilder = new WeakReference<StringBuilder>(builder);

It is not the default type/class of Reference Object, in order to be used it should be explicitely specified like in the above example. This kind of reference makes the references object eligible for GC, this means: in case the only reference reachable for the StringBuilder object in memory is, actually, the weak reference, then the GC is allowed to garbage collect the StringBuilder object. When an object in memory is reachable only by weak Reference Objects, it becomes automatically eligible for GC.

Levels of Weakness

Two different levels of weakness can be enlisted: soft and phantom. A soft Reference Object is basically a weak Reference Object that remains in memory a bit more: normally, it resists GC cycle until memory is available and there is no risk of OutOfMemoryError (in that case, it can be removed). In the other hand, a phantom Reference Object is useful only to know exactly when an object has effectively removed from memory: normally they are used to fix weird finalize() revival/resurrection behaviors, since they actually do not return the object itself but only helps in keeping track of its memory presence (here a very comprehensive explanation).

Weak Reference Objects are ideal to implement Cache modules, in fact a sort of automatic eviction can be implemented by allowing the GC to clean up memory areas whenever objects/values are no longer reachable by strong references chain. An example is the WeakHashMap retaining weak keys.

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The three terms that you have used are mostly related to Object's eligibility to get Garbage collected .

Weak Reference :: Its a reference that is not strong enough to force the object to remain in memory . Its the garbage collector's whims to collect that object for garbage collection. You can't force that GC not to collect it .

Soft Reference :: Its more or less same like the weak reference . But you can say that it holds the object a bit more strongly than the weak reference from garbage collection.

If the Garbage collectors collect the weak reference in the first life cycle itself, it will collect the soft reference in the next cycle of Garbage collection.

Strong Reference :: Its just opposite to the above two kind of references . They are less like to get garbage collected (Mostly they are never collected.)

You can refer to the following link for more info :

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/ref/Reference.html

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I think this is wrong - "If the Garbage collectors collect the weak reference in the first life cycle itself, it will collect the soft reference in the next cycle of Garbage collection." It is not necessarily that way, how can you be so sure that they occur in consecutive run of GC? GC can allow soft referenced objects to live even in 2nd run and 3rd run too. There is not documentation for it, if there is then please mention the link specifying. – Saurabh Patil Nov 29 '14 at 3:08
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Also, your answer is a little vague, look at this sentence ' Its more or less same like the weak reference . But you can say that it holds the object a bit more strongly than the weak reference from garbage collection.' - he is clearly asking about the difference and not similarities, all these words add more confusion than clarity to the topic. – Saurabh Patil Nov 29 '14 at 3:42
    
@SaurabhPatil -- Missed your comment. Here goes the answers . 1. "he is clearly asking about the difference and not similarities" -- Refer to the description of the question (not "only" the title) "Please give me some advice, and please give me some example to describe". 2. "But you can say that it holds the object a bit more .... " I think SOF gives an option to down-vote and give new answers too. – Sabya Apr 2 '15 at 2:17

The simple difference between SoftReference and WeakReference is provided by Android Developer.

The difference between a SoftReference and a WeakReference is the point of time at which the decision is made to clear and enqueue the reference:

  • A SoftReference should be cleared and enqueued as late as possible, that is, in case the VM is in danger of running out of memory.

  • A WeakReference may be cleared and enqueued as soon as is known to be weakly-referenced.

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4 degrees of reference - Strong,weak,soft,phantom

Strong reference - is a kind of reference, which makes the referenced object not eligible for GC. builder classes. eg - StringBuilder

Weak - is a reference which is eligible for GC.

Soft - is a kind of reference whose object is eligible for GC until memory is avaiable. Best for image cache. It will hold them till the memory is available.

Phantom - is a kind of reference whose object is directly eligible for GC. Used only to know when an object is removed from memory. uses - 1) Allows you to identify when an object is exactly removed from memory. 2) when finalize() method is overloaded, then GC might not happen in timely fashion for GC eligible objects of the two classes. So phantom reference makes them eligible for GC before finalize(), is why you can get OutOfMemoryErrors even when most of the heap is garbage.

Weak references are ideal to implement the cache modules.

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