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The multirow subselect will be used in the right hand side of the in operator in the where clause:

create table t (a integer);
insert into t (a) values (1), (9);

drop function if exists f();

create function f()
returns void as $$
begin
execute '
    select a
    from t
    where a in $1
' using (select 1 union select 2);
end;$$
language plpgsql;

select f();

ERROR:  more than one row returned by a subquery used as an expression
CONTEXT:  SQL statement "SELECT (select 1 union select 2)"
PL/pgSQL function "f" line 3 at EXECUTE statement

How to achieve what the above function would if it worked?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I see nothing in your question that couldn't more easily be solved with:

SELECT a
FROM   t
JOIN  (VALUES (1), (2)) x(a) USING (a); -- any query returning multiple int

Can you clarify the necessity in your example?


As a proof of concept, this would be simpler / faster:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION x.f1()
  RETURNS SETOF integer AS
$BODY$
BEGIN
RETURN QUERY EXECUTE '
    SELECT a
    FROM t
    WHERE a = ANY($1)'
USING ARRAY(VALUES (1), (2)); -- any query here
END;
$BODY$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Performance of IN () and = ANY()

Your observation is spot on. And there is reason for it. Try:

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE id IN (1,2,3);

The query plan will reveal:

Index Cond: (id = ANY ('{1,2,3}'::integer[]))

PostgreSQL transforms the id IN (..) construct into id = ANY(..) internally. These two perform identically - except for a negligible overhead penalty.

My code is only faster in building the statement - exactly as you diagnosed.

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Yes simpler and probably faster at building the query (I'm accepting it) but the execution plan cost is exactly the same as my own answer (=any vs in). The necessity is that the table is partitioned and if the where parameters are not constants the planner will not optimize the query. –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 21 '12 at 21:29
    
@Clodoaldo: I added a bit concerning your observation about performance. –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 21 '12 at 21:45
    
@Clodoaldo: You could take something like my simple query and run it with EXECUTE. Forces re-planning in any case. A JOIN will be faster than an IN () expression, especially with longer lists of values. –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 21 '12 at 21:56
    
No I mean what I wrote. Check one of the last paragraphs postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/… I have experienced sluggish queries turn into blazing fast ones when the where or join parameters were turned into constants. Oh you just deleted your comment. I guess you checked the manual or something. No re-planning will avoid this planner behavior when the condition involves a partitioned table. –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 21 '12 at 22:05
    
@Clodoaldo: Yeah, I removed the first sentence, right after I had typed it because I had it backwards. –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 21 '12 at 22:48
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create function f()
returns setof integer as $$
begin
return query execute format('
    select a
    from t
    where a in %s
', replace(replace(array(select 1 union select 2)::text, '{', '('), '}', ')'));
end$$
language plpgsql;
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