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example: position(1,list(1,list(2,nil)),Z).
Z = 1. position(3,list(1,list(2,list(3,nil)),Z). Z = 3. where Z is the position of element X in a data structure of a list in the above format

Here was my solution:

      position(X,list(nil),0).                %empty list
      position(X,list(X,T),1).                %list with X as head or first element 
      position(X,list(H,T),Z):-
                             position(X,list(T,nil),Z1), %X is in tail of list (H,T)
                             Z is Z1 + 1.
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, it won't work. The correct predicate is:

position(X,list(nil),0).                %empty list
position(X,list(X,T),1).                %list with X as head or first element
position(X,list(H,T),Z):-
                position(X, T, Z1), %X is in tail of list (H,T)
                Z is Z1 + 1.

Writing position(X,list(T,nil),Z1), %X is in tail of list (H,T) will result in a loop, and it is a logic error as there is no reason to call position with a list(T, nil). T is already either a list or the nil atom.

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yes ofCourse makes sense error in logic but isn't this equivalent to position(X,[],0). position(X,[X|T],1). position(X,[H,T],Z):- position(X,T,Z1), Z is Z1 + 1. for the predefined list structure in prolog. @andreapier –  M.K Mar 21 '12 at 17:53

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