Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Once upon a time, to write x86 assembler, for example, you would have instructions stating "load the EDX register with the value 5", "increment the EDX" register, etc.

With modern CPUs that have 4 cores (or even more), at the machine code level does it just look like there are 4 separate CPUs (i.e. are there just 4 distinct "EDX" registers) ? If so, when you say "increment the EDX register", what determines which CPU's EDX register is incremented? Is there a "CPU context" or "thread" concept in x86 assembler now?

How does communication/synchronization between the cores work?

If you were writing an operating system, what mechanism is exposed via hardware to allow you to schedule execution on different cores? Is it some special priviledged instruction(s)?

If you were writing an optimizing compiler/bytecode VM for a multicore CPU, what would you need to know specifically about, say, x86 to make it generate code that runs efficiently across all the cores?

What changes have been made to x86 machine code to support multi-core functionality?

share|improve this question
17  
I think your question is very clear. – Gerhard Jun 11 '09 at 13:46
1  
There's a similar (though not identical) question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/714905/… – Nathan Fellman Jun 17 '09 at 7:38

10 Answers 10

up vote 82 down vote accepted

This isn't a direct answer to the question, but it's an answer to a question that appears in the comments. Essentially, the question is what support the hardware gives to multi-threaded operation.

Nicholas Flynt had it right, at least regarding x86. In a multi threaded environment (Hyper-threading, multi-core or multi-processor), the Bootstrap thread (usually thread 0 in core 0 in processor 0) starts up fetching code from address 0xfffffff0. All the other threads start up in a special sleep state called Wait-for-SIPI. As part of its initialization, the primary thread sends a special inter-processor-interrupt (IPI) over the APIC called a SIPI (Startup IPI) to each thread that is in WFS. The SIPI contains the address from which that thread should start fetching code.

This mechanism allows each thread to execute code from a different address. All that's needed is software support for each thread to set up its own tables and messaging queues. The OS uses those to do the actual multi-threaded scheduling.

As far as the actual assembly is concerned, as Nicholas wrote, there's no difference between the assemblies for a single threaded or multi threaded application. Each logical thread has its own register set, so writing:

mov edx, 0

will only update EDX for the currently running thread. There's no way to modify EDX on another processor using a single assembly instruction. You need some sort of system call to ask the OS to tell another thread to run code that will update its own EDX.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for filling the gap in Nicholas' answer. Have marked yours as the accepted answer now.... gives the specific details I was interested in... although it would be better if there was a single answer that had your information and Nicholas' all combined. – Paul Hollingsworth Jun 14 '09 at 0:27
1  
This doesn't answer the question of where the threads come from. Cores and processors is a hardware thing, but somehow threads must be created in software. How does the primary thread know where to send the SIPI? Or does the SIPI itself create a new thread? – rich remer Jul 19 '14 at 19:35
2  
@richremer: It seems like you're confusing HW threads and SW threads. The HW thread always exists. Sometimes it's asleep. The SIPI itself wakes the HW thread and allows it to run SW. It is up to the OS and BIOS to decide which HW threads run, and which processes and SW threads run on each HW thread. – Nathan Fellman Jul 19 '14 at 20:24

As I understand it, each "core" is a complete processor, with its own register set. Basically, the BIOS starts you off with one core running, and then the operating system can "start" other cores by initializing them and pointing them at the code to run, etc.

Synchronization is done by the OS. Generally, each processor is running a different process for the OS, so the multi-threading functionality of the operating system is in charge of deciding which process gets to touch which memory, and what to do in the case of a memory collision.

share|improve this answer
19  
which does beg the question though: What instructions are available to the operating system to do this? – Paul Hollingsworth Jun 11 '09 at 13:34
4  
There's a set of priviledged instructions for that, but it's the problem of operating system, not the application code. If application code wants to be multithreaded it has to call operating system functions to do the "magic". – sharptooth Jun 11 '09 at 13:52
1  
The BIOS will usually identify how many cores are available and will pass this information to the OS when asked. There are standards which the BIOS (and hardware) must conform to such that access to hardware specifics (processors, cores, PCI bus, PCI cards, mouse, keyboard, graphics, ISA, PCI-E/X, memory etc) for different PCs looks the same from the OS's point of view. If the BIOS doesn't report that there are four cores the OS will usually assume that there is only one. There might even be a BIOS setting to experiment with. – Olof Forshell Feb 22 '11 at 12:06

enter image description here The Unofficial SMP FAQ


Once upon a time, to write x86 assembler, for example, you would have instructions stating "load the EDX register with the value 5", "increment the EDX" register, etc. With modern CPUs that have 4 cores (or even more), at the machine code level does it just look like there are 4 separate CPUs (i.e. are there just 4 distinct "EDX" registers) ?

Exactly. There are 4 sets of registers, including 4 separate instruction pointers.

If so, when you say "increment the EDX register", what determines which CPU's EDX register is incremented?

The CPU that executed that instruction, naturally. Think of it as 4 entirely different microprocessors that are simply sharing the same memory.

Is there a "CPU context" or "thread" concept in x86 assembler now?

No. The assembler just translates instructions like it always did. No changes there.

How does communication/synchronization between the cores work?

Since they share the same memory, it's mostly a matter of program logic. Although there now is an inter-processor interrupt mechanism, it's not necessary and was not originally present in the first dual-CPU x86 systems.

If you were writing an operating system, what mechanism is exposed via hardware to allow you to schedule execution on different cores?

Really, they schedule themselves. Once they are all started (that does take some work) they are all running at the same time. Since they are all running the same kernel image, that kernel is simply written in such a way that the different cores will cooperate and, for example, divide up the Unix or Windows threads so that two cores don't try to run the same program at the same time. So, simplified, in the OS scheduler a core will set a lock, pick a process to run, set a flag saying it is running, and clear the lock. The next core that enters the scheduler code will pick a process that is not yet running purely based on the flags.

Is it some special priviledged instruction(s)?

No. The cores are just all running in the same memory with the same old instructions.

If you were writing an optimizing compiler/bytecode VM for a multicore CPU, what would you need to know specifically about, say, x86 to make it generate code that runs efficiently across all the cores?

You run the same code as before. It's the Unix or Windows kernel that needed to change.

You could summarize my question as "What changes have been made to x86 machine code to support multi-core functionality?"

Nothing was necessary. The first SMP systems used the exact same instruction set as uniprocessors. Now, there has been a great deal of x86 architecture evolution and zillions of new instructions to make things go faster, but none were necessary for SMP.

For more information, see the Intel Multiprocessor Specification.

Update: all the follow-up questions can be answered by just completely accepting that an n-way multicore CPU is almost1 exactly the same thing as n separate processors that just share the same memory.2


1. For backwards compatibility, only the first core starts up at reset, and a few driver-type things need to be done to fire up the remaining ones.
2. They also share all the peripherals, naturally.

share|improve this answer
1  
I always think "thread" is a software concept, which makes me difficult to understand multi-core processor, the problem is , how can codes tell a core "I'm going to create a thread running in core 2"? Is there any special assembly code to do it ? – demonguy Feb 9 '15 at 12:41
    
@demonguy: No, there's no special instruction for anything like that. You ask the OS to run your thread on a specific core by setting an affinity mask (which says "this thread can run on this set of logical cores"). It's completely a software issue. Each CPU core (hardware thread) is independently running Linux (or Windows). To work together with the other hardware threads, they use shared data structures. But you never "directly" start a thread on a different CPU. You tell the OS you'd like to have a new thread, and it makes a note in a data structure which the OS on another core sees. – Peter Cordes Dec 29 '15 at 21:03
    
I can tell os it, but how os put codes onto specific core ? – demonguy Dec 30 '15 at 14:36
1  
@demonguy ... (simplified) ... each core shares the OS image and starts running it in the same place. So, for 8 cores, that's 8 "hardware processes" running in the kernel. Each one calls the same scheduler function that checks the process table for a runnable process or thread. (That's the run queue.) Meanwhile, programs with threads work without awareness of the underlying SMP nature. They just fork(2) or something and let the kernel know they want to run. Essentially, the core finds the process, rather than the process finding the core. – DigitalRoss Jan 4 at 20:22
    
@DigitalRoss, Per your answer, are you telling him to write his own OS? – Pacerier May 12 at 10:21

Each Core executes from a different memory area. Your operating system will point a core at your program and the core will execute your program. Your program will not be aware that there are more than one core or on which core it is executing.

There is also no additional instruction only available to the Operating System. These cores are identical to single core chips. Each Core runs a part of the Operating System that will handle communication to common memory areas used for information interchange to find the next memory area to execute.

This is a simplification but it gives you the basic idea of how it is done. More about multicores and multiprocessors on Embedded.com has lots of information about this topic ... This topic get complicated very quickly!

share|improve this answer

Minimal runnable Intel x86 example

Runnable example with all required boilerplate. All major parts are covered below.

Tested on Ubuntu 15.10 QEMU 2.3.0 and Lenovo ThinkPad T400.

The Intel Manual Volume 3 System Programming Guide - 325384-056US September 2015 covers SMP in chapters 8, 9 and 10.

Table 8-1. "Broadcast INIT-SIPI-SIPI Sequence and Choice of Timeouts" contains actual example that basically just works:

MOV ESI, ICR_LOW    ; Load address of ICR low dword into ESI.
MOV EAX, 000C4500H  ; Load ICR encoding for broadcast INIT IPI
                    ; to all APs into EAX.
MOV [ESI], EAX      ; Broadcast INIT IPI to all APs
; 10-millisecond delay loop.
MOV EAX, 000C46XXH  ; Load ICR encoding for broadcast SIPI IP
                    ; to all APs into EAX, where xx is the vector computed in step 10.
MOV [ESI], EAX      ; Broadcast SIPI IPI to all APs
; 200-microsecond delay loop
MOV [ESI], EAX      ; Broadcast second SIPI IPI to all APs
                    ; Waits for the timer interrupt until the timer expires

On that code:

  1. Most operating systems will make most of those operations impossible from ring 3 (user programs).

    So you need to write your own kernel to play freely with it: a userland Linux program will not work.

  2. At first, a single processor runs, called the bootstrap processor (BSP).

    It must wake up the other ones (called Application Processors (AP)) through special interrupts called Inter Processor Interrupts (IPI).

    Those interrupts can be done by programming Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller (APIC) through the Interrupt command register (ICR)

    The format of the ICR is documented at: 10.6 "ISSUING INTERPROCESSOR INTERRUPTS"

    The IPI happens as soon as we write to the ICR.

  3. ICR_LOW is defined at 8.4.4 "MP Initialization Example" as:

    ICR_LOW EQU 0FEE00300H
    

    The magic value 0FEE00300 is the memory address of the ICR, as documented at Table 10-1 "Local APIC Register Address Map"

  4. The simplest possible method is used in the example: it sets up the ICR to send broadcast IPIs which are delivered to all other processors except the current one.

    But it is also possible, and recommended by some, to get information about the processors through special data structures setup by the BIOS like ACPI tables or Intel's MP configuration table and only wake up the ones you need one by one.

  5. XX in 000C46XXH encodes the address of the first instruction that the processor will execute as:

    CS = XX * 0x100
    IP = 0
    

    Remember that CS multiples addresses by 0x10, so the actual memory address of the first instruction is:

    XX * 0x1000
    

    So if for example XX == 1, the processor will start at 0x1000.

    We must then ensure that there is 16-bit real mode code to be run at that memory location, e.g. with:

    cld
    mov $init_len, %ecx
    mov $init, %esi
    mov 0x1000, %edi
    rep movsb
    
    .code16
    init:
        xor %ax, %ax
        mov %ax, %ds
        /* Do stuff. */
        hlt
    .equ init_len, . - init
    

    Using a linker script is another possibility.

  6. The delay loops are an annoying part to get working: there is no super simple way to do such sleeps precisely.

    Possible methods include:

    • PIT (used in my example)
    • HPET
    • calibrate the time of a busy loop with the above, and use it instead

    Related: How to display a number on the screen and and sleep for one second with DOS x86 assembly?

  7. I think the initial processor needs to be in protected mode for this to work as we write to address 0FEE00300H which is too high for 16-bits

  8. To communicate between processors, we can use a spinlock on the main process, and modify the lock from the second core.

    We should ensure that memory write back is done, e.g. through wbinvd.

Shared state between processors

8.7.1 "State of the Logical Processors" says:

The following features are part of the architectural state of logical processors within Intel 64 or IA-32 processors supporting Intel Hyper-Threading Technology. The features can be subdivided into three groups:

  • Duplicated for each logical processor
  • Shared by logical processors in a physical processor
  • Shared or duplicated, depending on the implementation

The following features are duplicated for each logical processor:

  • General purpose registers (EAX, EBX, ECX, EDX, ESI, EDI, ESP, and EBP)
  • Segment registers (CS, DS, SS, ES, FS, and GS)
  • EFLAGS and EIP registers. Note that the CS and EIP/RIP registers for each logical processor point to the instruction stream for the thread being executed by the logical processor.
  • x87 FPU registers (ST0 through ST7, status word, control word, tag word, data operand pointer, and instruction pointer)
  • MMX registers (MM0 through MM7)
  • XMM registers (XMM0 through XMM7) and the MXCSR register
  • Control registers and system table pointer registers (GDTR, LDTR, IDTR, task register)
  • Debug registers (DR0, DR1, DR2, DR3, DR6, DR7) and the debug control MSRs
  • Machine check global status (IA32_MCG_STATUS) and machine check capability (IA32_MCG_CAP) MSRs
  • Thermal clock modulation and ACPI Power management control MSRs
  • Time stamp counter MSRs
  • Most of the other MSR registers, including the page attribute table (PAT). See the exceptions below.
  • Local APIC registers.
  • Additional general purpose registers (R8-R15), XMM registers (XMM8-XMM15), control register, IA32_EFER on Intel 64 processors.

The following features are shared by logical processors:

  • Memory type range registers (MTRRs)

Whether the following features are shared or duplicated is implementation-specific:

  • IA32_MISC_ENABLE MSR (MSR address 1A0H)
  • Machine check architecture (MCA) MSRs (except for the IA32_MCG_STATUS and IA32_MCG_CAP MSRs)
  • Performance monitoring control and counter MSRs

Cache sharing is discussed at: Cache memories in Multicore CPUs

Intel hyperthreads have greater cache and pipeline sharing than separate cores: http://superuser.com/questions/133082/hyper-threading-and-dual-core-whats-the-difference/995858#995858

Linux kernel 4.2

The main initialization action seems to be at arch/x86/kernel/smpboot.c.

share|improve this answer

If you were writing an optimizing compiler/bytecode VM for a multicore CPU, what would you need to know specifically about, say, x86 to make it generate code that runs efficiently across all the cores?

As someone who writes optimizing compiler/bytecode VMs I may be able to help you here.

You do not need to know anything specifically about x86 to make it generate code that runs efficiently across all the cores.

However, you may need to know about cmpxchg and friends in order to write code that runs correctly across all the cores. Multicore programming requires the use of synchronisation and communication between threads of execution.

You may need to know something about x86 to make it generate code that runs efficiently on x86 in general.

There are other things it would be useful for you to learn:

You should learn about the facilities the OS (Linux or Windows or OSX) provides to allow you to run multiple threads. You should learn about parallelization APIs such as OpenMP and Threading Building Blocks, or OSX 10.6 "Snow Leopard"'s forthcoming "Grand Central".

You should consider if your compiler should be auto-parallelising, or if the author of the applications compiled by your compiler needs to add special syntax or API calls into his program to take advantage of the multiple cores.

share|improve this answer
2  
<pedantic>Snow Leopard is OS 10.6, not 10.7</pedantic> ;-) – A. Levy Jun 11 '09 at 13:56
    
fixed, thanks A. – Alex Brown Jun 11 '09 at 16:43
    
Don't have several popular VMs like .NET and Java have a problem that their main GC process is covered in locks and fundamentally singlethreaded? – Marco van de Voort Jun 11 '09 at 20:14

The assembly code will translate into machine code that will be executed on one core. If you want it to be multithreaded you will have to use operating system primitives to start this code on different processors several times or different pieces of code on different cores - each core will execute a separate thread. Each thread will only see one core it is currently executing on.

share|improve this answer
3  
I was going to say something like this, but then how does the OS allocate threads to cores? I imagine there are some privileged assembly instructions which accomplish this. If so, I think that is the answer the author is looking for. – A. Levy Jun 11 '09 at 13:34
    
There's no instruction for that, that's the duty of operating system scheduler. There are operating system functions like SetThreadAffinityMask in Win32 and the code can call them, but it's operating system stuff and affects the scheduler, it's not a processor instruction. – sharptooth Jun 11 '09 at 13:48
1  
There must be an OpCode or else the operating system wouldn't be able to do it either. – Matthew Whited Jun 11 '09 at 14:18
1  
Not really an opcode for scheduling - it's more like you get one copy of the OS per processor, sharing a memory space; whenever a core re-enters the kernel (syscall or interrupt), it looks at the same data structures in memory to decide what thread to run next. – pjc50 Oct 27 '09 at 14:00
    
@A.Levy: When you start a thread with an affinity that only lets it run on a different core, it doesn't immediately move to the other core. It has its context saved to memory, just like a normal context switch. The other hardware threads see its entry in the scheduler data structures, and one of them will eventually decide that it will run the thread. So from the perspective of the first core: you write to a shared data structure and eventually OS code on another core (hardware thread) will notice it and run it. – Peter Cordes Dec 29 '15 at 21:08

It's not done in machine instructions at all; the cores pretend to be distinct CPUs and don't have any special capabilities for talking to one another. There are two ways they communicate:

  • they share the physical address space. The hardware handles cache coherency, so one CPU writes to a memory address which another reads.

  • they share an APIC (programmable interrupt controller). This is memory mapped into the physical address space, and can be used by one processor to control the others, turn them on or off, send interrupts, etc.

http://www.cheesecake.org/sac/smp.html is a good reference with a silly url.

share|improve this answer
    
They don't in fact share an APIC. Each logical CPU has its own one. The APICs communicate between themselves, but they are separate. – Nathan Fellman Oct 27 '09 at 15:07
    
They synchronize (rather than communicate) in one basic way and that is through the LOCK prefix (the instruction "xchg mem,reg" contains an implicit lock request) which runs to the lock pin which runs to all buses effectively telling them that the CPU (actually any bus-mastering device) wants exclusive access to the bus. Eventually a signal will return to the LOCKA (acknowledge) pin telling the CPU that it now has exclusive access to the bus. Since external devices are much slower than the internal workings of the CPU a LOCK/LOCKA sequence may require many hundreds of CPU cycles to complete. – Olof Forshell Feb 22 '11 at 12:14

The main difference between a single- and a multi-threaded application is that the former has one stack and the latter has one for each thread. Code is generated somewhat differently since the compiler will assume that the data and stack segment registers (ds and ss) are not equal. This means that indirection through the ebp and esp registers that default to the ss register won't also default to ds (because ds!=ss). Conversely, indirection through the other registers which default to ds won't default to ss.

The threads share everything else including data and code areas. They also share lib routines so make sure that they are thread-safe. A procedure that sorts an area in RAM can be multi-threaded to speed things up. The threads will then be accessing, comparing and ordering data in the same physical memory area and executing the same code but using different local variables to control their respective part of the sort. This of course is because the threads have different stacks where the local variables are contained. This type of programming requires careful tuning of the code so that inter-core data collisions (in caches and RAM) are reduced which in turn results in a code which is faster with two or more threads than it is with just one. Of course, an un-tuned code will often be faster with one processor than with two or more. To debug is more challenging because the standard "int 3" breakpoint will not be applicable since you want to interrupt a specific thread and not all of them. Debug register breakpoints do not solve this problem either unless you can set them on the specific processor executing the specific thread you want to interrupt.

Other multi-threaded code may involve different threads running in different parts of the program. This type of programming does not require the same kind of tuning and is therefore much easier to learn.

share|improve this answer

What has been added on every multiprocessing-capable architecture compared to the single-processor variants that came before them are instructions to synchronize between cores. Also, you have instructions to deal with cache coherency, flushing buffers, and similar low-level operations an OS has to deal with. In the case of simultaneous multithreaded architectures like IBM POWER6, IBM Cell, Sun Niagara, and Intel "Hyperthreading", you also tend to see new instructions to prioritize between threads (like setting priorities and explicitly yielding the processor when there is nothing to do).

But the basic single-thread semantics are the same, you just add extra facilities to handle synchronization and communication with other cores.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.