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First question on SO - I've read it many, many times so time to drop in and get my feet wet in the community!

I start by getting a single row from a Linq query:

var relationshipDetails = (from p in dc.tbl_ClientRelationships
                           where p.ID == relationship_id
                           select p).FirstOrDefault();

Then I look through a list of strings (_cols), which is the known column names (and also form item names) like so:

foreach (string c in _cols)
    {
      if (relationshipDetails.GetType().GetProperty(c).GetValue(relationshipDetails, null).ToString() != null)
        {
           setValue(relationshipDetails.GetType().GetProperty(c).GetValue(relationshipDetails, null).ToString(), c);
         }
     }

the setValue() method basically assigns the returned value to the webcontrol (and has logic to determine the type and how it should be assigned etc..)

My question, is there a better way to get a value out of a Linq object from a know property value? It works on some forms but has recently just blown up on me!

Otherwise, I'm tempted to go back to the old method or returning a DataRow from the DAL and just reference by name easily!

Thanks in advance, Mark

share|improve this question
5  
C# does not "blow up", it throws exceptions. Exceptions include, among other information, a type, a message and a stack trace. –  Jon Mar 21 '12 at 18:15
    
Yes a better way is really needed, you are using Reflection in the loop. Thats a costly operation. Ill wait for the experts answer –  zenwalker Mar 21 '12 at 18:17
    
Why are you actively trying to throw away type safety ? –  asawyer Mar 21 '12 at 18:17
    
@Jon I'm getting a System.NullReferenceException on the line ot check if it's null. I.e. it's null before I even check if it's null. However if I do a response.write on one of the properties that works fine. –  RemarkLima Mar 21 '12 at 18:19
1  
@RemarkLima: Great. Now debug the code and find out at which point an expression evaluates to null in the chain starting with relationshipDetails.. –  Jon Mar 21 '12 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First:

var relationshipDetails = (from p in dc.tbl_ClientRelationships
                          where p.ID == relationship_id
                          select p).FirstOrDefault();

Linq queries are objects that represent the query, keep them separate and distinct from the results of those queries. In this case I'd suggest something like this instead:

var relationshipDetails = dc.tbl_ClientRelationships
                              .FirstOrDefault( p => p.Id == relationship_id);

Now, this is going to be very slow:

foreach (string c in _cols)
{
  if (relationshipDetails.GetType().GetProperty(c).GetValue(relationshipDetails, null).ToString() != null)
    {
       setValue(relationshipDetails.GetType().GetProperty(c).GetValue(relationshipDetails, null).ToString(), c);
     }
 }

You can easily get a reference to the reflection members and cut down on the overhead, maybe something like this: (Might not be 100% syntax correct)

var properties = relationshipDetails.GetType().GetProperties();

foreach (string c in _cols)
{
    var currentProperty = properties.Single( p=> p.Name == c );

    if (currentProperty.GetValue(relationshipDetails, null) != null)
    {
        setValue(currentProperty.GetValue(relationshipDetails, null).ToString(), c);
    }
}

Finally - Why are you doing this? Please detail exactly what you are trying to do, and why refering to the columns in a type safe named manner ie:

relationshipDetails.Id = ...
relationshipDetails.SomethingElse = ...
relationshipDetails.AnotherThing = ...

Won't work in your case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank youf or the detailed answer, I'll try it out now. The reason is as follows: The markup has it's textbox, checkbox, dropdown etc... controls, all with a name suffixed with the column name of the database. When the form loads, it loops through the webcontrols, and builds a list of column names. These can then be used to create SQL updates and inserts. And when loading data, I have the column names in question, so just need to reference them to the queried object. It's sounding more and more like I should stick to the old datarows for this? –  RemarkLima Mar 21 '12 at 18:39
    
all with a name suffixed with the column name of the database Are you ok with exposing intimate detailed schema information about your data tables to anyone loading your page? If this came up in a code review I would strongly advise against this. –  asawyer Mar 21 '12 at 18:41
    
This all sounds like you are trying to recreate FormView for some reason. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fyf1dk77(v=vs.85).aspx –  asawyer Mar 21 '12 at 18:42
    
It's not a public facing application and the users essentially already know the schema so no worries there (at least as far as I can think). The formview could work however there's a lot of fields to cover and using custom tags on the markup I'm adding validation depending on the tag's value. However, I may have started down the wrong path - it has been known! –  RemarkLima Mar 21 '12 at 18:50

One of the biggest advantages (in my opinion) of Linq to (Sql / Entities) is that the objects returned are strongly-typed. You're using LinqToX and then using reflection to assign values, you are basically doing what the old school DataRow did.

I'm not sure why you are trying to dynamically assign values. This definitely is an XY Problem.

share|improve this answer
    
It's all starting to click! I've never worked with Linq fully before, so thought it was time to get stuck in! Information like this is invaluable. It's easy to get carried away on the hype that "Linq does everything!", when some of the older methods will also do. –  RemarkLima Mar 21 '12 at 18:34

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