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I have to find the lowest input given, then average out the total minus the lowest score. I am having a bit of trouble with my averageScore function finding the lowest score from the array. I am getting very odd numbers as my output. Any suggestions on how to adjust this would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

//function prototypes
double* allocate(int&);
double averageScore(int&);

int main()
{   
    double* testArray;
        int numOfScores;
    double average;

    testArray = allocate(numOfScores);
    average = averageScore(numOfScores);

    //delete memory created
    delete[] testArray;

    return 0;
}

//function to collect user info, dynamically allocate
double* allocate(int &numOfScores)
{
    double* testArray;

    //prompt user for scores
    cout << "How many test scores would\n";
    cout << "you like to process: ";

    //user input validation 
    if(!(cin >> numOfScores))
    {
        cout << "Invalid input!\n";
        cout << "Program termination, please\n";
        cout << "restart the program." << endl;
        exit(0);
    }
    else if(numOfScores < 0)
    {
        cout << "Invalid input!\n";
        cout << "Program termination, please\n";
        cout << "restart the program." << endl;
        exit(0);
    }

    //dynammically allocate an arrray to hold the scores
    testArray = new double[numOfScores];

    //get the scores from user
    for (int count = 0; count < numOfScores; count++)   
    {
        cout << "Enter Score: ";

        //user input validation 
        if(!(cin >> testArray[count]))
        {
            cout << "Invalid input!\n";
            cout << "Program termination, please\n";
            cout << "restart the program." << endl;
            exit(0);
        }
        else if(testArray[count] < 0.0)
        {
            cout << "Invalid input!\n";
            cout << "Program termination, please\n";
            cout << "restart the program." << endl;
            exit(0);
        }


    }

    return testArray;
}

//function to calculate the average score
double averageScore(int &numOfScores)
{   
    double* testArray;

    double total,
           average,
           scores[0],
           lowest;

    lowest = scores[0];   

    //calculate total scores entered
    for(int count = 0; count < numOfScores; count++)
    {
        total += testArray[count];

        //find lowest score entered 
        for(int count = 1; count < numOfScores; count++)
        {
            if (testArray[numOfScores] < lowest)
                lowest = scores[numOfScores];
        }
    }

    //average the total amount of scores drop the lowest
    average = (total -  lowest) / numOfScores;

    cout << "The average test score is: " << average << endl;
    cout << "Lowest is: " << lowest << endl;

    return average;
}
share|improve this question
    
two comments: use vectors instead of dynamically allocated arrays if you can, and there is no point to 'int &numOfScores' when you're not going to modify it, just pass it by value. –  Bwmat Mar 21 '12 at 18:38
    
why are you doing double averageScore(int &numOfScores) instead of double averageScore(int numOfScores)? –  twain249 Mar 21 '12 at 18:38
    
You don't need the inner for loop to find the lowest value. Just compare each testArray[count] value to lowest in your outer loop. –  Adam Liss Mar 21 '12 at 18:39
    
If you're removing one of the scores, you should divide by (numOfScores - 1) to reflect that. Also, you need to check for the special case in which there is only one score to avoid dividing by zero. –  Bwmat Mar 21 '12 at 18:39
    
Also you create a local variable testArray but I can't find anywhere where you fill it. –  twain249 Mar 21 '12 at 18:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a lot of problems with your averageScore function, but i'll cover the most basic one for now.

First off, you should pass it some sort of data. Right now you're using testArray I don't even see where it is allocated. I'm surprised that you're not getting segmentation faults when you run this.

But it's also not initialized. In c++, when you declare a pointer, the variable it points to has a value. It has a garbage value, and if you perform arithmetic operations with that garbage value, then your output will be garbage too.

You have to make your list of scores available to your averageScore function, preferably by passing them in as a parameter.

the beginning of your averaging function looks like the following:

double averageScore(int &numOfScores)
{   
    double* testArray;
    ...

instead it should look like this

double averageScore(double*testArray, int numOfScores)
{   
    ...

when you use &numOfScores instead of numOfScores, that means that if you change numOfScores in your averageScore function, than it will change in your main function as well, and you shouldn't do that.

now, on the double* testArray; line, you're declaring a brand new pointer, named "testArray", and there's no meaningful data in it, although it might be full of garbage. there might be other double pointer variables, named "testArray" in your code, but none of them are in the scope of your averageScore function. If you pass testArray in, in your method call, you'll then be able to use it. for example: double someNumber = testArray[i].

Bare in mind that your array is also being passed by reference. If you would rather pass it by value, you can try

`double averageScore(double testArray[], int numOfScores)`

but don't quote me on that one

Once you've done that, your code will still have some issues, but the output should be meaningful enough that you'll hopefully be able to work those out on your own.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I thought i was passing the list of scores to 'averageScore' as a parameter with '&numOfScores' –  Gmenfan83 Mar 21 '12 at 18:57
    
@Gmenfan83 &numOfScores is just a reference to a single interger, and it appears to be the count of the scores. only making that available to your function is like asking a person "I have 5 numbers, can you find their average?" I'll edit my answer a bit to help you along –  Sam I am Mar 21 '12 at 19:02
    
Than you @Sam I am very much to take the time out to explain this to me. It is much appreciated. I will soak this in a attempt to revise what's needs to be. –  Gmenfan83 Mar 21 '12 at 19:28
    
I seem to be having difficulties with passing function values and references and pointers. –  Gmenfan83 Mar 21 '12 at 19:29
std::vector<double> scores = {1.2,6.5,3.0,8.3,4.8,6,7.7};

// drop lowest score
scores.erase(min_element(begin(scores),end(scores)));

double average = accumulate(begin(scores),end(scores),0.0)/scores.size();
share|improve this answer
1  
While this may be correct, my guess is that this is beyond the scope of the current course he is taking(note the homework tag) and would not be the approach to take on this. –  jzworkman Mar 21 '12 at 18:50
    
you should probably add namespace specifiers, but like this answer, less is more! And favours the std lib –  111111 Mar 21 '12 at 19:14

Couple issues. You shouldnt have those two for loops nested(instead just check if the value is lower than the lowest using an if statement).

Since this is homework I will give you the steps and then you can fix your code

  1. Loop through and calculate the total, finding the lowest score at the same time
  2. Calculate the average as (total-lowest)/(numScores -1)
  3. Return the average
share|improve this answer
    
could you explain why i would do (total-lowest)/(numScores -1) rather (total - lowest)/ numOfScores? Thank you. I am just confused and want to learn. I know this is homework but i also want o be a programmer so it is important. –  Gmenfan83 Mar 21 '12 at 19:58
1  
Because you are taking one of the values out of your total. Imagine I have the following input: 1, 3, 5, if I take out the lowest(1) then my average is (3+5)/2 since I have two values that I am averaging. You wouldnt want it to be (3+5)/3 because after removing the lowest value you only have 2 values left, not 3 –  jzworkman Mar 21 '12 at 20:02
    
I see, thank you for the explanation! –  Gmenfan83 Mar 21 '12 at 20:04

I think you want to change this line:

if(testArray[numOfScores] < lowest)

to this:

if(testArray[count] < lowest)

Also, as @jzworkman points out, the denominator for averaging should be (numScores - 1) since you are eliminating the lowest score from the numerator. (If applicable, you might want to test for the edge case where there is only one score, which leaves nothing to average once you eliminate the lowest score.)

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