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Why are people always using enum values like 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and not 0, 1, 2, 3, 4?

Has this something to do with bit operations, etc.?

I would really appreciate a small sample snippet on how this is used correctly :)

[Flags]
public enum Permissions
{
    None   = 0,
    Read   = 1,
    Write  = 2,
    Delete = 4
}
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1  
possible duplicate of Enum as Flag using, setting and shifting –  Henk Holterman Mar 21 '12 at 21:52
23  
I disagree on the dupe vote. –  zzzzBov Mar 21 '12 at 22:08
    
UNIX way to set permission is also based on the same logic. –  Rudy Mar 22 '12 at 6:52
2  
@Pascal: You may find it helpful to read about Bitwise OR (and Bitwise AND ), which is what | (and &) represent. The various answers assume you are familiar with it. –  Brian Mar 22 '12 at 13:42
2  
@IAdapter I can see why you'd think that, as the answer to both are the same, but I think the questions are different. The other question just asks for an example or explanation of the Flags attribute in C#. This question seems to be about the concept of bit flags, and the fundamentals behind them. –  Jeremy S Mar 28 '12 at 17:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 230 down vote accepted

Because they are powers of two and I can do this:

var permissions = Permissions.Read | Permissions.Write;

And perhaps later...

if( (permissions & Permissions.Write) == Permissions.Write )
{
    // we have write access
}

It is a bit field, where each set bit corresponds to some permission (or whatever the enumerated value logically corresponds to). If these were defined as 1, 2, 3, ... you would not be able to use bitwise operators in this fashion and get meaningful results. To delve deeper...

Permissions.Read   == 1 == 00000001
Permissions.Write  == 2 == 00000010
Permissions.Delete == 4 == 00000100

Notice a pattern here? Now if we take my original example, i.e.,

var permissions = Permissions.Read | Permissions.Write;

Then...

permissions == 00000011

See? Both the Read and Write bits are set, and I can check that independently (Also notice that the Delete bit is not set and therefore this value does not convey permission to delete).

It allows one to store multiple flags in a single field of bits.

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2  
@Malcolm: It does; myEnum.IsSet. I am of the opinion that this is a completely useless abstraction and serves only to cut down typing, but meh –  Ed S. Mar 21 '12 at 23:42
1  
Good answer, but you should mention why the Flags attribute is applied, and when you wouldn't want to apply Flags to some enums as well. –  Andy Mar 22 '12 at 0:20
3  
@Andy: Actually, the Flags attribute does little more than give you 'pretty printing' iirc. You can use an enumerated value as a flag regardless of the presence of the attribute. –  Ed S. Mar 22 '12 at 0:21
3  
@detly: Because if statements in C# require a boolean expression. 0 is not false; false is false. You could however write if((permissions & Permissions.Write) > 0). –  Ed S. Mar 22 '12 at 1:35
1  
Instead of the 'tricky' (permissions & Permissions.Write) == Permissions.Write, you can now use enum.HasFlag() –  Baboon Oct 23 '12 at 12:21

If it is still not clear from the other answers, think about it like this:

[Flags] 
public enum Permissions 
{   
   None = 0,   
   Read = 1,     
   Write = 2,   
   Delete = 4 
} 

is just a shorter way to write:

public enum Permissions 
{   
    DeleteNoWriteNoReadNo = 0,   // None
    DeleteNoWriteNoReadYes = 1,  // Read
    DeleteNoWriteYesReadNo = 2,  // Write
    DeleteNoWriteYesReadYes = 3, // Read + Write
    DeleteYesWriteNoReadNo = 4,   // Delete
    DeleteYesWriteNoReadYes = 5,  // Read + Delete
    DeleteYesWriteYesReadNo = 6,  // Write + Delete
    DeleteYesWriteYesReadYes = 7, // Read + Write + Delete
} 

There are eight possibilities but you can represent them as combinations of only four members. If there were sixteen possibilities then you could represent them as combinations of only five members. If there were four billion possibilities then you could represent them as combinations of only 33 members! It is obviously far better to have only 33 members, each (except zero) a power of two, than to try to name four billion items in an enum.

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30  
+1 for the mental image of an enum with four billion members. And the sad part is, probably somebody out there has tried it. –  Daniel Pryden Mar 21 '12 at 22:53
22  
@DanielPryden As a daily reader of Daily WTF, I'd believe it. –  fluffy Mar 22 '12 at 4:19
    
2^33 = ~8.6 billion. For 4 billion different values you only need 32 bits. –  Michael Kjörling Mar 22 '12 at 8:27
5  
@MichaelKjörling one of the 33 is for the 0 default –  ratchet freak Mar 22 '12 at 9:24
    
@ratchetfreak Drat. You are right. –  Michael Kjörling Mar 22 '12 at 13:21

Because these values represent unique bit locations in binary:

1 == binary 00000001
2 == binary 00000010
4 == binary 00000100

etc., so

1 | 2 == binary 00000011

EDIT:

3 == binary 00000011

3 in binary is represented by a value of 1 in both the ones place and the twos place. It is actually the same as the value 1 | 2. So when you are trying to use the binary places as flags to represent some state, 3 isn't usually meaningful (unless there is a logical value that actually is the combination of the two)

For further clarification, you might want to extend your example enum as follows:

[Flags]
public Enum Permissions
{
  None = 0,   // Binary 0000000
  Read = 1,   // Binary 0000001
  Write = 2,  // Binary 0000010
  Delete = 4, // Binary 0000100
  All = 7,    // Binary 0000111
}

Therefore in I have Permissions.All, I also implicitly have Permissions.Read, Permissions.Write, and Permissions.Delete

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and what is the problem with 2|3 ? –  Pascal Mar 21 '12 at 19:05
2  
See my edit for why –  Chris Shain Mar 21 '12 at 19:08
1  
@Pascal: Because 3 is 11 binary, i.e., it does not map to a single set bit, so you lose the ability to map 1 bit in an arbitrary position to a meaningful value. –  Ed S. Mar 21 '12 at 19:08
7  
@Pascal put another way, 2|3 == 1|3 == 1|2 == 3. So if you have a value with binary 00000011, and your flags included values 1, 2, and 3, then you wouldn't know if that value represents 1 and 3, 2 and 3, 1 and 2 or only 3. That makes it a lot less useful. –  yshavit Mar 21 '12 at 20:00
[Flags]
public Enum Permissions
{
    None   =    0; //0000000
    Read   =    1; //0000001
    Write  = 1<<1; //0000010
    Delete = 1<<2; //0000100
    Blah1  = 1<<3; //0001000
    Blah2  = 1<<4; //0010000
}

I think writing like this is easier to understand and read, and you don't need to calculate it.

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These are used to represent bit flags which allows combinations of enum values. I think it's clearer if you write the values in hex notation

[Flags]
public Enum Permissions
{
  None =  0x00,
  Read =  0x01,
  Write = 0x02,
  Delete= 0x04,
  Blah1 = 0x08,
  Blah2 = 0x10
}
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4  
@Pascal: Perhaps it is more readable to you at this point in time, but as you gain experience viewing bytes in hex becomes second nature. Two digits in hex maps to one byte maps to 8 bits (well... a byte is usually 8 bits anyway... not always true, but for this example it is ok to generalize). –  Ed S. Mar 21 '12 at 19:11
5  
@Pascal quick, what do you get when you multiply 4194304 by 2? How about 0x400000? It's much easier to recognize 0x800000 as the correct answer than 8388608, and it's also less error-prone to type the hex value. –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 20:43
6  
It's a lot easier to tell, at a glance, if your flags are set properly (i.e., are powers of 2), if you use hex. Is 0x10000 a power of two? Yes, it starts with 1, 2, 4, or 8 and has all 0s afterwards. You do not need to mentally translate 0x10 to 16 (though doing so will probably become second nature eventually), just think of it as, "some power of 2". –  Brian Mar 21 '12 at 21:40
1  
I'm absolutely with Jared about it being much easier to note in hex. you just use 1 2 4 8 and shift –  Nico Mar 22 '12 at 1:13
1  
Personally, I prefer just using e.g. P_READ=1<<0, P_WRITE=1<,1, P_RW = P_READ|P_WRITE. I'm not sure if that sort of constant-folding works in C# but it works just fine in C/C++ (as well as Java, I think). –  fluffy Mar 22 '12 at 4:18

This is really more of a comment, but since that wouldn't support formatting, I just wanted to include a method I've employed for setting up flag enumerations:

[Flags]
public enum FlagTest
{
    None = 0,
    Read = 1,
    Write = Read * 2,
    Delete = Write * 2,
    ReadWrite = Read|Write
}

I find this approach especially helpful during development in the case where you like to maintain your flags in alphabetical order. If you determine you need to add a new flag value, you can just insert it alphabetically and the only value you have to change is the one it now precedes.

Note, however, that once a solution is published to any production system (especially if the enum is exposed without a tight coupling, such as over a web service), then it is highly advisable against changing any existing value within the enum.

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Lot's of good answers to this one… I'll just say.. if you do not like, or cannot easily grasp what the << syntax is trying to express.. I personally prefer an alternative (and dare I say, straightforward enum declaration style)…

typedef NS_OPTIONS(NSUInteger, Align) {
    AlignLeft         = 00000001,
    AlignRight        = 00000010,
    AlignTop          = 00000100,
    AlignBottom       = 00001000,
    AlignTopLeft      = 00000101,
    AlignTopRight     = 00000110,
    AlignBottomLeft   = 00001001,
    AlignBottomRight  = 00001010
};

NSLog(@"%ld == %ld", AlignLeft | AlignBottom, AlignBottomLeft);

LOG 513 == 513

So much easier (for myself, at least) to comprehend. Line up the ones… describe the result you desire, get the result you WANT.. No "calculations" necessary.

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