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Im following this tutorial on how to make a simple bootable kernel: http://www.osdever.net/tutorials/view/writing-a-simple-c-kernel

there are the following required files in the tutorial:

kernel.c source code:

#define WHITE_TXT 0x07 // white on black text

void k_clear_screen();
unsigned int k_printf(char *message, unsigned int line);


k_main() // like main in a normal C program
{
    k_clear_screen();
    k_printf("Hi!\nHow's this for a starter OS?", 0);
};

void k_clear_screen() // clear the entire text screen
{
    char *vidmem = (char *) 0xb8000;
    unsigned int i=0;
    while(i < (80*25*2))
    {
        vidmem[i]=' ';
        i++;
        vidmem[i]=WHITE_TXT;
        i++;
    };
};

unsigned int k_printf(char *message, unsigned int line) // the message and then the line #
{
    char *vidmem = (char *) 0xb8000;
    unsigned int i=0;

    i=(line*80*2);

    while(*message!=0)
    {
        if(*message=='\n') // check for a new line
        {
            line++;
            i=(line*80*2);
            *message++;
        } else {
            vidmem[i]=*message;
            *message++;
            i++;
            vidmem[i]=WHITE_TXT;
            i++;
        };
    };

    return(1);
};

kernel_start.asm source code:

[BITS 32]

[global start]
[extern _k_main] ; this is in the c file

start:
  call _k_main

  cli  ; stop interrupts
  hlt ; halt the CPU

link.ld source code:

OUTPUT_FORMAT("binary")
ENTRY(start)
SECTIONS
{
  .text  0x100000 : {
    code = .; _code = .; __code = .;
    *(.text)
    . = ALIGN(4096);
  }
  .data  : {
    data = .; _data = .; __data = .;
    *(.data)
    . = ALIGN(4096);
  }
  .bss  :
  {
    bss = .; _bss = .; __bss = .;
    *(.bss)
    . = ALIGN(4096);
  }
  end = .; _end = .; __end = .;
}

The instructions to compile it are:

nasm -f aout kernel_start.asm -o ks.o
gcc -c kernel.c -o kernel.o
ld -T link.ld -o kernel.bin ks.o kernel.o

i am able to successfully execute the first two lines:

nasm -f aout kernel_start.asm -o ks.o
gcc -c kernel.c -o kernel.o

then when i try and run this line :

ld -T link.ld -o kernel.bin ks.o kernel.o

I get the error:

C:\basic_kernel>ld -T link.ld -o kernel.bin ks.o kernel.o
ks.o: file not recognized: File format not recognized

Does anyone know why this is and how I could fix this? I'm using windows 7 64 bit

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2 Answers 2

NASM defaults to flat binary mode when not given a format with the -f option. You need to change -f aout to -f elf in order to link the produced object file

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Your gcc and ld are probably expecting PECOFF or ELF object files, rather than a.out, which is old and obsolete. Try removing the -f aout from your nasm invocation.

If that doesn't work, try naming this file ks.s, assembling it with gcc ks.s -c -o ks.o, and using it instead of the ks.o / kernel_start.asm you have:

    .text
    .code32
    .globl start
start:
    call _k_main
    cli
    hlt

Warning: It doesn't show up in this example, but the instruction syntax used when you write assembly this way is very different from what you might be expecting. This SO question links to a guide.

Additional wrinkle to be aware of: there are excellent odds that you should not have an underscore at the beginning of the symbol _k_main in the assembly. Underscores at the beginning of all symbols defined in C is how it worked in a.out, but is not done in ELF. I don't know about PECOFF.

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1  
If I remove the "-f aout" I get the error: "kernel_start.asm:21: error: binary output format does not support external references" –  P'sao Mar 21 '12 at 20:09
    
Never mind the first comment. When i tried the linker line i get this: ld: cannot perform PE operations on non PE output file 'kernel.bin'. Any ideas? –  P'sao Mar 21 '12 at 21:38
    
I'm running out of ideas here, I've never tried to do this myself. It might help if you ran the commands gcc --version, as --version, and ld --version and added the output to your question. –  Zack Mar 22 '12 at 2:15

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