Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've a method in a class that get's a pointer to another object (of a different class)and adds an object (of another different class) to a vector that is a member variable of the first object (the one that is passed as a parameter). This is the code:

ObstacleManager::ObstacleManager(Application *lApp)
{
    app=lApp;
    GLfloat obstacleVerts[12]={
    -0.1f,-0.2f,0.0f,
    0.1f,-0.2f,0.0f,
    -0.1f,0.2f,0.0f,
    0.1f,0.2f,0.0f
    };
    StandardObstacle obstacle(obstacleVerts,-0.7f,0.0f,4);
    obstacle.manager=this;
    lApp->characters.push_back(&obstacle);
}

I think the problem is that the obstacle object gets released when it shouldn't, because if I change the code and create the obstacle with a "new" (if you create an object with new you have to manually delete it, don't you?) It works. Like this:

ObstacleManager::ObstacleManager(Application *lApp)
{
    app=lApp;
    GLfloat obstacleVerts[12]={
    -0.1f,-0.2f,0.0f,
    0.1f,-0.2f,0.0f,
    -0.1f,0.2f,0.0f,
    0.1f,0.2f,0.0f
    };
    StandardObstacle *obstacle=new StandardObstacle(obstacleVerts,-0.7f,0.0f,4);
    obstacle->manager=this;
    lApp->characters.push_back(obstacle);
}

Is there a way to prevent this from happening?

share|improve this question
    
lApp->characters.push_back(obstacle); + change container T. but you really should learn about pointers, memory management.. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 21 '12 at 19:42
    
what does + change container mean? –  XaitormanX Mar 21 '12 at 19:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are passing the address of a local object to the vector, the local object does not exist once the constructor returns and your vector then has a pointer which points to invalidated memory.

You will have to make the object persist, possible ways are:
Just push the object by value or
Use dynamically allocated object but instead of raw pointer use a smart pointer like shared_ptr as the vector element type.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I tryed to have a vector of objects instead of object pointer but i couldn't manage to get it to work(here is a question related to the problem: link ) and i had to use pointers. I try to use smart pointers –  XaitormanX Mar 21 '12 at 19:57
    
One question, If I create a smart pointer like this: boost::shared_ptr<StandardObstacle> obstaclePtr(new StandardObstacle(obstacleVerts,-0.7f,0.0f,4));, Will it be deleted when it isn't referenced from anywhere?. –  XaitormanX Mar 21 '12 at 22:05
    
@XaitormanX: Yes it will be. You have to take care though that you do not have any circular references. –  Alok Save Mar 22 '12 at 2:40

Yes, you either create the object with new or use smart pointers instead.

Your intuition is correct:

ObstacleManager::ObstacleManager(Application *lApp)
{
    //...
    StandardObstacle obstacle(obstacleVerts,-0.7f,0.0f,4);
    obstacle.manager=this;
    lApp->characters.push_back(&obstacle);
}   //obstacle is destroyed here

The object obstacle is created in automatic storage. Its lifetime is limited by its enclosing scope, which is the closing bracket in the constructor.

So you take the address of an object, push it into your vector, and then the object is destroyed. That means that, inside the vector, you now have a dangling pointer.

This will most certainly lead to undefined behavior.

You can either use new, as you have, and make sure to clean up the memory. Or you can use smart pointers - which is more C++-ish than raw pointers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.