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In C#.NET, I like using HashSets because of their supposed O(1) time complexity for lookups. If I have a large set of data that is going to be queried, I often prefer using a HashSet to a List, since it has this time complexity.

What confuses me is the constructor for the HashSet, which takes IEqualityComparer as an argument:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb359100.aspx

In the link above, the remarks note that the "constructor is an O(1) operation," but if this is the case, I am curious if lookup is still O(1).

In particular, it seems to me that, if I were to write a Comparer to pass in to the constructor of a HashSet, whenever I perform a lookup, the Comparer code would have to be executed on every key to check to see if there was a match. This would not be O(1), but O(n).

Does the implementation internally construct a lookup table as elements are added to the collection?

In general, how might I ascertain information about complexity of .NET data structures?

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Just test it with varying input sizes and see if the lookup time scales or remains constant. Pretty sure that the documentation is correct however. –  Ed S. Mar 21 '12 at 20:07
    
It is still a HashSet once the constructor is over. The source data-structure itself is not kept (e.g. there is no "proxy" in this case). Lookup is O(1) but insert is amortized O(1). –  user166390 Mar 21 '12 at 20:08
    
@Kirby That doesn't change. You could construct the HashSet from an IEnumerable or add the elements individually later: the only thing that might be different, which does not affect the [lookup] time complexity, is the capacity. –  user166390 Mar 21 '12 at 20:09
    
Just read a bit about how a hash table really works: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hash_table (a hash set is a simplified hash table) –  The Nail Mar 21 '12 at 20:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A HashSet works via hashing (via IEqualityComparer.GetHashCode) the objects you insert and tosses the objects into buckets per the hash. The buckets themselves are stored in an array, hence the O(1) part.

For example (this is not necessarily exactly how the C# implementation works, it just gives a flavor) it takes the first character of the hash and throws everything with a hash starting with 1 into bucket 1. Hash of 2, bucket 2, and so on. Inside that bucket is another array of buckets that divvy up by the second character in the hash. So on for every character in the hash....

Now, when you look something up, it hashes it, and jumps thru the appropriate buckets. It has to do several array lookups (one for each character in the hash) but does not grow as a function of N, the number of objects you've added, hence the O(1) rating.

To your other question, here is a blog post with the complexity of a number of collections' operations: http://c-sharp-snippets.blogspot.com/2010/03/runtime-complexity-of-net-generic.html

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I believe hashing into buckets occurs in case of collision –  sll Mar 21 '12 at 20:09
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@sll hashing into buckets always occurs; if there's no collision, the bucket holds one item. –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 20:11
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Thank you, Scott. For some reason, your explanation was very clear to me, particular due to the bit about calling, "IEqualityComparer.GetHashCode." It makes a lot of sense, now. –  Kirby Mar 21 '12 at 20:21
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@Kirby the basic explanation here is correct, but the character-based hashing implementation is not. In fact, there's only one array indexing operation to retrieve the correct bucket for a hash code (no jumping); the index is calculated as hashCode % buckets.Length. –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 20:25
    
@phoog: Thank you, and I certainly concur. Do you know how the implementation chooses the number of buckets? And what it does exactly inside each bucket when there's more than one element in there? –  Scott Stafford Mar 21 '12 at 20:35

if I were to write a Comparer to pass in to the constructor of a HashSet, whenever I perform a lookup, the Comparer code would have to be executed on every key to check to see if there was a match. This would not be O(1), but O(n).

Let's call the value you are searching for the "query" value.

Can you explain why you believe the comparer has to be executed on every key to see if it matches the query?

This belief is false. (Unless of course the hash code supplied by the comparer is the same for every key!) The search algorithm executes the equality comparer on every key whose hash code matches the query's hash code, modulo the number of buckets in the hash table. That's how hash tables get O(1) lookup time.

Does the implementation internally construct a lookup table as elements are added to the collection?

Yes.

In general, how might I ascertain information about complexity of .NET data structures?

Read the documentation.

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2  
To expand on "Read the documentation", in some places the documentation is a bit sparse. In that case for most of the framework assemblies you can simply read the source code(!), that Microsoft provides via the Reference Source Program. Of course anything not documented is potentially subject to change, but in many cases you can determine some facts that are not likely to change. –  Kevin Cathcart Mar 21 '12 at 21:01
    
"Unless of course the hash code supplied by the comparer is the same for every key!".. so what happens if the same hashcode value returned and the item managed to be added in the hashset collection? –  user384080 Apr 30 at 6:43
    
@user384080: Then the stated belief is true. That's what "unless" means in that sentence. –  Eric Lippert Apr 30 at 7:21
    
maybe this is a question more to @Scott Stafford -- if i implementing the GetHashCode() method in IEqualityComparer like so: "return StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase .GetHashCode(item.ID);" . My question is what happens if the Equals methods return false? does it mean (theoretically) you will have "duplicate" items in the hashset? –  user384080 Apr 30 at 23:46

It would depends on quality of hash function (GetHashCode()) your IEqualityComparer implementation provides. Ideal hash function should provide well-distributed random set of hash codes. These hash codes will be used as an index which allows mapping key to a value, so search for a value by key becomes more efficient especially when a key is a complex object/structure.

the Comparer code would have to be executed on every key to check to see if there was a match. This would not be O(1), but O(n).

This is not how hashtable works, this is some kind of straightforward bruteforce search. In case of hashtable you would have more intelligent approach which uses search by index (hash code).

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the OP is asking about HashSet<T>, not Hashtable (and the implementation details are somewhat different). –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 20:12
    
Thanks for noting that, I'm not sure but want to make things clear, this is what I've found in MSDN: The HashSet(Of T) class is based on the model of mathematical sets and provides high-performance set operations similar to accessing the keys of the Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue) or Hashtable collections. In simple terms, the HashSet(Of T) class can be thought of as a Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue) collection without values. –  sll Mar 21 '12 at 20:17
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that's true. HashSet<T> and the Dictionary<T> actually use the same internal class to handle the core logic. The non-generic Hashtable uses a different implementation, but the performance characteristics would be similar. Your description of the importance of the hash function applies to both (which I failed to note) so +1. –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 20:19
    
@phoog: thanks, you've forced me to read documentation and find something new about HashSet<T>, this is always great –  sll Mar 21 '12 at 20:27

Lookup is still O(1) if you pass an IEqualityComparer. The hash set still uses the same logic as if you don't pass an IEqualityComparer; it just uses the IEqualityComparer's implementations of GetHashCode and Equals instead of the instance methods of System.Object (or the overrides provided by the object in question).

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