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Write an algorithm to find F(n) the number of bits set to 1, in all numbers from 1 to n for any given value of n.

Complexity should be O(log n)

For example:

1: 001
2: 010
3: 011
4: 100
5: 101
6: 110

So

F(1) = 1,  
F(2) = F(1) + 1 = 2,
F(3) = F(2) + 2 = 4,
F(4) = F(3) + 1 = 5,
etc.

I can only design an O(n) algorithm.

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9  
Hint: If you can design an O(1) solution for "how many numbers have a particular bit set from 1 to N", you can design an O(log N) solution for total number of bits. –  Jimmy Mar 21 '12 at 20:59
    
umm, I have a question. Are you asking "How to find the total bits set in a number?" or something else? –  noMAD Mar 21 '12 at 21:05
4  
@owlstead I don't know about you, but when I find a question that's interesting to me I invest time in answering it regardless of how much time somebody else already has, especially for classic puzzlers like interview questions. I don't get the big deal about investing time before posting - you either appreciate interview questions or you don't. It's not like somebody is asking you to do their job for them... sheesh.. –  Assaf Lavie Mar 21 '12 at 21:16
    
@noMAD, for example, given n = 3, since 1 = 01, 2 = 10, 3 = 11, the total number of 1 bit from 1 to 3 is 1+1+2=4. Hope this clarity. –  FihopZz Mar 21 '12 at 21:23
    
@gigantt.com I was just commenting on the formatting of the question, hoping to get the asker to create a question that doesn't need translation, I'll edit the "ur"'s out myself, maybe the asker learned English from YouTube... oh, too late. –  owlstead Mar 21 '12 at 21:28
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8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The way to solve these sorts of problems is to write out the first few values, and look for a pattern

Number  binary   # bits set   F(n)
1       0001     1            1
2       0010     1            2
3       0011     2            4
4       0100     1            5
5       0101     2            7
6       0110     2            9
7       0111     3            12
8       1000     1            13
9       1001     2            15
10      1010     2            17
11      1011     3            20
12      1100     2            22
13      1101     3            25
14      1110     3            28
15      1111     4            32

It takes a bit of staring at, but with some thought you notice that the binary-representations of the first 8 and the last 8 numbers are exactly the same, except the first 8 have a 0 in the MSB (most significant bit), while the last 8 have a 1. Thus, for example to calculate F(12), we can just take F(7) and add to it the number of set bits in 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12. But that's the same as the number of set-bits in 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 (ie. F(4)), plus one more for each number!

#    binary
0    0 000
1    0 001
2    0 010
3    0 011
4    0 100
5    0 101
6    0 110
7    0 111

8    1 000  <--Notice that rightmost-bits repeat themselves
9    1 001     except now we have an extra '1' in every number!
10   1 010
11   1 011
12   1 100

Thus, for 8 <= n <= 15, F(n) = F(7) + F(n-8) + (n-7). Similarly, we could note that for 4 <= n <= 7, F(n) = F(3) + F(n-4) + (n-3); and for 2 <= n <= 3, F(n) = F(1) + F(n-2) + (n-1). In general, if we set a = 2^(floor(log(n))), then F(n) = F(a-1) + F(n-a) + (n-a+1)


This doesn't quite give us an O(log n) algorithm; however, doing so is easy. If a = 2^x, then note in the table above that for a-1, the first bit is set exactly a/2 times, the second bit is set exactly a/2 times, the third bit... all the way to the x'th bit. Thus, F(a-1) = x*a/2 = x*2^(x-1). In the above equation, this gives us

F(n) = x*2x-1 + F(n-2x) + (n-2x+1)

Where x = floor(log(n)). Each iteration of calculating F will essentially remove the MSB; thus, this is an O(log(n)) algorithm.

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I find it crazy that so many people believe this algorithm is lg n. It's not. If you can't read it, try implementing it. –  kasavbere Mar 23 '12 at 17:32
    
"Each iteration of calculating F will essentially remove the MSB; thus, this is an O(log(n)) algorithm." That's not a true statement. You don't get x for free, do you? so you for each looping F(n-2^x) you must get x, then x*2^(x-1), etc. –  tribal Mar 23 '12 at 17:47
    
@kasavbre, tribal: Care to explain? It is indeed O(log n) if you assume 2^x is an O(1) operation (which is it on real-world computers, using left-shift) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 23 '12 at 17:50
    
but getting x is not. –  tribal Mar 23 '12 at 17:52
    
@tribal: Yes, obtaining x can be done theoretically be done in O(1) in hardware. In fact, on modern x86 and x64 machines, it is: It's called the BSR instruction (__builtin_clz in GCC; _BitScanReverse in VC++). In either case, though, I really don't believe this bit of pedantry deserves a downvote :| –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 23 '12 at 18:01
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If n= 2^k-1, then F(n)=k*(n+1)/2

For a general n, let m be the largest number such that m = 2^k-1 and m<=n. F(n) = F(m) + F(n-m-1) + (n-m).

Corner condition: F(0)=0 and F(-1)=0.

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Let k be the number of bits needed for n.

for 0,...,2^(k-1)-1 each bit is up exactly for half of the numbers, so we have (k-1)*2^(k-1)/2 = (k-1)*2^(k-2) bits up so far. We only need to check what's up with the numbers that are bigger then 2^(k-1)-1
We also have for those n-2^(k-1)-1 bits "up" for the MSB.

So we can derive to the recursive function:

f(n) = (k-1)*2^(k-2) + n-(2^(k-1)-1) + f(n-(2^(k-1)))
           ^               ^            ^
         first            MSBs        recursive call for 
       2^(k-1)-1                      n-2^(k-1) highest numbers
        numbers

Where base is f(0) = 0 and f(2^k) = k*2^(k-1) + 1 [as we seen before, we know exactly how much bits are up for 2^(k-1)-1, and we just need to add 1 - for the MSB of 2^k]

Since the value sent to f is reduced by by at least half at every iteration, we get total of O(logn)

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"each bit is up exactly for half of the numbers, so we have 2^k/2 bits up" - it's k*2^k/2, each number is k bits long. also the resursive formula is not right, see the definition of f(x). –  Karoly Horvath Mar 21 '12 at 21:58
    
@KarolyHorvath: fixed, thanks.. I followed the logic trail without putting to much thaught into details, thanks for catching that up! –  amit Mar 21 '12 at 22:02
1  
no problem ;) though you start wondering what kind of drugs the upvoters are using.. :D –  Karoly Horvath Mar 21 '12 at 22:04
    
@KarolyHorvath: I editted again, it is actually (k-1) * 2^k/2 since we are talking only about the first k-1 bits... I think the upvoters are after an approach and not necesserally a perfect solution... –  amit Mar 21 '12 at 22:05
    
in that case it's (k-1) * 2^(k-1)/2 –  Karoly Horvath Mar 21 '12 at 22:07
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consider the below:

0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111

If you want to find total number of set bits from 1 to say 14 (1110) Few Observations:

  1. 0th bit (LSB) 1 bit appears once every two bit (see vertically) so number of set bits = n/2 +(1 if n's 0th bit is 1 else 0)
  2. 1st bit : 2 consecutive 1s appear every four bits (see 1st bit vertically along all numbers) number of set bits in 1st bit position = (n/4 *2) + 1 (since 1st bit is a set, else 0)
  3. 2nd bit: 4 consecutive 1s appear every 8 bits ( this one is a bit tricky) number of set bits in 2nd position = (n/8*4 )+ 1( since 2nd bit is set, else 0) + ((n%8)%(8/2)) the last term is to include the number of 1s that were outside first (n/8) group of bits (14/8 =1 considers only 1 group ie. 4 set bits in 8 bits. we need to include 1s found in last 14-8 = 6 bits)
  4. 3rd bit: 8 consecutive 1s appear every 16 bits (similar to above) number of set bits in 3rd position = (n/16*8)+1(since 3rd bit is set, else 0)+ ((n%16)%(16/2))

so we do O(1) calculation for each bit of a number n. a number contains log2(n) bits. so when we iterate the above for all positions of n and add all the set bits at each step, we get the answer in O(logn) steps

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A quick search for the values of the sequence F lead to this integer sequence http://oeis.org/A000788

There I spotted a formula: a(0) = 0, a(2n) = a(n)+a(n-1)+n, a(2n+1) = 2a(n)+n+1 (a is the same as F since I just copy the formula from oeis)

which could be used to compute a(n) in log(n).

Here's my sample C++ code:

memset(cache, -1, sizeof(cache))
cache[0] = 0

int f(int n)
    if cache[n] != -1 return cache[n];
    cache[n] = n % 2 ? (2 * f(n / 2) + n / 2 + 1) : (f(n / 2) + f(n / 2 - 1) + n / 2)
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short and sweet!

 public static int countbits(int num){
    int count=0, n;
    while(num > 0){
        n=0;
        while(num >= 1<<(n+1))
            n++;
        num -= 1<<n;
        count += (num + 1 + (1<<(n-1))*n);
    }
    return count;
}//countbis
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Not logarithmic time –  Nemo Mar 23 '12 at 2:15
    
@Nemo, try again. –  kasavbere Mar 23 '12 at 4:14
    
@kasavbere, can you explain it? Thanks. –  FihopZz Mar 23 '12 at 4:57
    
FihopZz is there a reason you marked @BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft as the correct answer instead of this one? –  kasavbere Mar 23 '12 at 5:04
    
Well for one thing this is O((log n)^2), not O(log n) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Mar 23 '12 at 5:21
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Here is the java function

private static int[] findx(int i) {
    //find the biggest power of two number that is smaller than i
    int c = 0;
    int pow2 = 1;
    while((pow2<< 1) <= i) {
        c++;
        pow2 = pow2 << 1;
    }
    return new int[] {c, pow2};
}

public static int TotalBits2(int number) {
    if(number == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    int[] xAndPow = findx(number);
    int x = xAndPow[0];
    return x*(xAndPow[1] >> 1) + TotalBits2(number - xAndPow[1]) + number - xAndPow[1] + 1;
}
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this is coded in java...
logic: say number is 34, binary equal-ant is 10010, which can be written as 10000 + 10. 10000 has 4 zeros, so count of all 1's before this number is 2^4(reason below). so count is 2^4 + 2^1 + 1(number it self). so answer is 35.
*for binary number 10000. total combinations of filling 4 places is 2*2*2*2x2(one or zero). So total combinations of ones is 2*2*2*2.

public static int getOnesCount(int number) {
    String binary = Integer.toBinaryString(number);
    return getOnesCount(binary);
}

private static int getOnesCount(String binary) {
    int i = binary.length();

    if (i>0 && binary.charAt(0) == '1') {
        return gePowerof2(i) + getOnesCount(binary.substring(1));
    }else if(i==0)
        return 1;
    else
        return getOnesCount(binary.substring(1));

}
//can be replaced with any default power function
private static int gePowerof2(int i){
    int count = 1;
    while(i>1){
        count*=2;
        i--;
    }
    return count;
}
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Doesnt work . Input -2 returns 3 instead of 2. –  KodeSeeker Nov 8 '13 at 1:42
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