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When creating a template function in C++ is there a simple way to have the typename of the template represented as a string? I have a simple test case to show what I'm trying to do (note the code shown does not compile):

#include <stdio.h>
template <typename type>
type print(type *addr) 
{
  printf("type is: %s",typename);
}

int main()
{
  int a;
  print(&a);
}

// Would like to print something like:
// type is: int

I think that the typename should be available at compile time when the function is instantiated, but I'm not that familiar with templates and I haven't seen a way to get the typename as a string.

The reason that I want to do this is for some printf type debugging. I have multiple threads running and stepping through with gdb changes the program behavior. So for some things I want to dump information about which functions were executing. It's not too important so if the solution is overly complex I would skip adding this information to my logging function. But if there was a simple way to do this it would be useful information to have.

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1  
Try typeid (type).name() after including <typeinfo> –  chris Mar 21 '12 at 21:44
    
do you strictly need it at compile time? otherwise, typeid(type).name() might help. –  Philipp Mar 21 '12 at 21:45
    
Never mind, didn't see the compile-time thing, but if you're printing it, I'm sure you can figure it out at run-time. –  chris Mar 21 '12 at 21:46
    
I once had a question to see if a template argument was void so it wouldn't return anything. If it helps, it's here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9625526/… –  chris Mar 21 '12 at 21:54
    
I don't think there's a way to get the name at compile time, since you couldn't do much of anything useful with it. typeid::name() is the right answer there. –  Mooing Duck Mar 21 '12 at 22:05
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

PRETTY_FUNCTION should solve your problem (at run time at least)

The output to the program below is:
asfdasdfasdf test::test() [with type = int]
asfdasdfasdf test::test() [with type = int]
asfdasdfasdf test::test() [with type = int]
asfdasdfasdf test::test() [with type = int]
asfdasdfasdf test::test() [with type = int]
asfdasdfasdf test::test() [with type = int]
asfdasdfasdf void tempFunction() [with type = bool]
asfdasdfasdf void tempFunction() [with type = bool]
asfdasdfasdf void tempFunction() [with type = bool]
asfdasdfasdf void tempFunction() [with type = bool]
asfdasdfasdf void tempFunction() [with type = bool]
asfdasdfasdf void tempFunction() [with type = bool]
!!!Hello World!!!

If you really, really, need the typename as a string, you could hack this (using snprintf instead of printf) and pull the substring after '=' and beflore ']'.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<typename type>
class test
{
public:
test()
{
    printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
}
};

template<typename type>
void tempFunction()
{
        printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
printf("asfdasdfasdf %s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
}

int main() {
test<int> test;

tempFunction<bool>();
cout << "!!!Hello World!!!" << endl; // prints !!!Hello World!!!
return 0;

}

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Since you have said you would need this for debugging purpose, maybe a runtime solution is also acceptable. And you have tagged this as g++ so you don't want to be standard conform.

Here is what that means:

#include <cxxabi.h> // the libstdc++ used by g++ does contain this header

template <typename type>
void print(const type *addr) // you wanted a pointer
{
  char * name = abi::__cxa_demangle(typeid(*addr).name(), 0, 0, NULL);
  printf("type is: %s\n", name);
  free(name);
}

print(new unsigned long);    // prints "type is: unsigned long"
print(new std::vector<int>); // prints "type is: std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> >"

EDIT: corrected the memory leak. Thx to Jesse.

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This doesn't work at compile time it just prints out the demangled name –  111111 Mar 21 '12 at 22:27
    
Just keep in mind that you are leaking memory as malloc is called with __cxa_demangle. –  Jesse Good Mar 21 '12 at 22:37
    
thanks the runtime solution works for what I need. –  Gabriel Mar 21 '12 at 22:43
    
I changed my accepted answer because for the problem I'm debugging doing the function call ended up changing the program behavior and so I was not reproducing the bug that I'm trying to fix. I thought the runtime overhead would not matter but I think the function call changed something with the stack and that did matter. The __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ method seems to work better for the problem I'm debugging, but both solutions look useful so thanks again. –  Gabriel Mar 21 '12 at 23:16
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if you have a known set of types used instantiate the template we can use the approach described in this older thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/1055452

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