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Quick question related to IIR filter coefficients. Here is a very typical implementation of a direct form II biquad IIR processor that I found online.

// b0, b1, b2, a1, a2 are filter coefficients
// m1, m2 are the memory locations
// dn is the de-denormal coeff (=1.0e-20f) 

void processBiquad(const float* in, float* out, unsigned length)
{
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
        register float w = in[i] - a1*m1 - a2*m2 + dn;
        out[i] = b1*m1 + b2*m2 + b0*w;
        m2 = m1; m1 = w;
    }
    dn = -dn;
}

I understand that the "register" is somewhat unnecessary given how smart modern compilers are about this kind of thing. My question is, are there any potential performance benefits to storing the filter coefficients in individual variables rather than using arrays and dereferencing the values? Would the answer to this question depend on the target platform?

i.e.

out[i] = b[1]*m[1] + b[2]*m[2] + b[0]*w;

versus

out[i] = b1*m1 + b2*m2 + b0*w;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It really depends on your compiler and the optimization options. Here is my take:

  • Any modern compiler would just ignore register. It is just a hint to the compiler and modern ones just don't use it.
  • Accessing constant indexes in a loop is usually optimized away when compiling with optimization on. In a sense, using variables or an array as you showed makes no difference.
  • Always, always run benchmarks and look at the generated code for performance critical sections of the code.

EDIT: OK, just out of curiosity I wrote a small program and got "identical" code generated when using full optimization with VS2010. Here is what I get inside the loop for the expression in question (exactly identical for both cases):

0128138D  fmul        dword ptr [eax+0Ch]  
01281390  faddp       st(1),st  
01281392  fld         dword ptr [eax+10h]  
01281395  fld         dword ptr [w]  
01281398  fld         st(0)  
0128139A  fmulp       st(2),st  
0128139C  fxch        st(2)  
0128139E  faddp       st(1),st  
012813A0  fstp        dword ptr [ecx+8]  

Notice that I added a few lines to output the results so that I make sure compiler does not just optimize away everything. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

class test1 
{
    float a1, a2, b0, b1, b2;
    float dn;
    float m1, m2;

public:
    void processBiquad(const float* in, float* out, unsigned length)
    {
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < length; ++i)
        {
            float w = in[i] - a1*m1 - a2*m2 + dn;
            out[i] = b1*m1 + b2*m2 + b0*w;
            m2 = m1; m1 = w;
        }
        dn = -dn;
    }
};

class test2 
{
    float a[2], b[3];
    float dn;
    float m1, m2;

public:
    void processBiquad(const float* in, float* out, unsigned length)
    {
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < length; ++i)
        {
            float w = in[i] - a[0]*m1 - a[1]*m2 + dn;
            out[i] = b[0]*m1 + b[1]*m2 + b[2]*w;
            m2 = m1; m1 = w;
        }
        dn = -dn;
    }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    test1 t1;
    test2 t2;

    float a[1000];
    float b[1000];

    t1.processBiquad(a, b, 1000);
    t2.processBiquad(a, b, 1000);

    std::copy(b, b+1000, std::ostream_iterator<float>(std::cout, " "));

    return 0;
}
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I am not sure, but this :

out[i] = b[1]*m[1] + b[2]*m[2] + b[0]*w;

might be worse, because it would compile to indirect access, and that is worse then direct access performance wise.

The only way to actually see, is to check the compiled assembler and profile the code.

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You will likely get a benefit if you can declare the coefficients b0, b1, b2 as const. Code will be more efficient if any of your operands are known and fixed at compile time.

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