Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am thinking of creating a multi-platform portable C++ server-client application. Is it even possible while using only standard libraries? If no, what other libraries are there?

Are there any improvements in this direction in C++11x? Like for threads, now we have std::threads.

To make it more clear.. I want something like boost::thread, which provides multiplatform portable multithreading, for networking.

And why C++ doesn't have libraries(standard) for such basic things like networking?

Update: Comparing to Python, which has everything (almost) built in to it... why not in C++?

share|improve this question
    
Don't try to compare the Python standard library with that of C++. That will just annoy the snake and leave you disappointed. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 21 '12 at 23:35
    
Consider Boost ASIO, POCO and (possibly) ACE. I believe ASIO has been proposed for C++ TR2, so it's likely to end up in the standard library eventually, just hasn't yet. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 21 '12 at 23:36
    
@GregHewgill- Lol.. no offense, no war intended but I believe C/C++ are the most powerful(not feature rich or something) languages. What do you think? –  questions Mar 21 '12 at 23:39
    
I don't think you can measure languages on a single "more powerful / less powerful" dimension. Each language has their different purposes and sometimes one is more suitable than another. You have to consider aspects such as how long it's going to take you to write your code in the first place. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 21 '12 at 23:42
3  
Oh, mr. questions. Networking is far, far, very far from a "basic" thing. –  user405725 Mar 21 '12 at 23:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is Boost Asio. It has existed for "only" a small number of years...long ago we had ACE, but it feels dated now.

share|improve this answer
    
I always thought Boost Asio was for Asynchronous I/O as name says. –  questions Mar 21 '12 at 23:36
1  
Socket programming is often, and perhaps best, done with asynchronous components. The two go rather hand-in-hand (though Boost Asio does let you do things without sockets too). –  John Zwinck Mar 21 '12 at 23:40
2  
boost::asio lets you do synchronous socket programming too. –  Chad Mar 22 '12 at 0:37

There have been many attempts to provide such a cross-platform library for networking over the years. The Berkeley socket library comes pretty close (and probably comes with your OS), but there are still platform-specific differences. Qt has network socket classes that attempt to be cross-platform within the subset of platforms that Qt normally supports. You can probably find lots of others.

There is no language standard networking library for C or C++ analogous to std::thread.

share|improve this answer
    
I use Windows.. though I love Linux :D –  questions Mar 21 '12 at 23:32
1  
The Winsock library that comes with Windows is the Berkeley socket library. You just need to call one Windows-specific function (WSAStartup()) and then you can use it normally. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 21 '12 at 23:33
1  
So using that can I write a portable application, which can be compiled directly on different platforms without any changes? –  questions Mar 21 '12 at 23:37
1  
Sure, you just need a few #ifdef conditionals for platform-specific bits. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 21 '12 at 23:38

There is no standard portable option in C++11.

However the portable boost::asio is one of the best networking API's. It is based on the proactor pattern which is very efficient.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/doc/html/boost_asio.html

share|improve this answer
    
Is it for networking? I always thought it was for Asynchronous Input Ouput. –  questions Mar 21 '12 at 23:35
1  
Yes it is for networking primarily. and the proactor is an Asynchronous model. It is very good in my usage. –  111111 Mar 21 '12 at 23:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.