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I have several methods that have a return type IEnumerable<T>. These methods are part of DomainService class, and on the client they are generated with a return type of InvokeOperation<T>

public InvokeOperation<IEnumerable<T>> MethodA(string prm, Action<InvokeOperation<IEnumerable<T>>> 

public InvokeOperation<IEnumerable<T>> MethodB(Action<InvokeOperation<IEnumerable<T>>> 

WHen calling these methods, the code in the callback is basically the same

void SomeMethodA(string someString, Action<ResultsArgs<string>> operationCompleted)
{
    MyContext.MethodA(someString, c =>
        {
            // same code (operationCompleted parameter is used)
        }, null);
}

void SomeMethodA(Action<ResultsArgs<string>> operationCompleted)
{
    MyContext.MethodB(c =>
        {
            // same code (operationCompleted parameter is used)
        }, null);
}

How can I refactor this so there is no duplicate code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

make a method that takes a c and operationCompleted....

then

  MyContext.MethodA(someString, c => MyShinyNewMethod(c, operationCompleted), null);
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I think you can just extract a method that take a InvokeOperation<IEnumerable<T>> and a Action<ResultsArgs<string>> as parameters. And then call the method in the c => { }.

void SomeMethodA(string someString, Action<ResultsArgs<string>> operationCompleted)
{
    MyContext.MethodA(someString, c =>
        {
            NewMethod(c, operationCompleted);
        }, null);
}

void SomeMethodA(string someString, Action<ResultsArgs<string>> operationCompleted)
{
    MyContext.MethodB(c =>
        {
            NewMethod(c, operationCompleted);
        }, null);
}
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