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Does anyone have a list of rough rule-of-thumb estimators for the various data structures? e.g.

  • Arrays
  • Lists
  • HashMaps
  • LinkedLists
  • etc.

I remember seeing some of these estimates thrown around in various places, but I can't seem to find one right now.

I know it's actually incredibly complicated, especially for things like HashMaps, but I'm looking for something really rough, like:

Memory(HashMap) = fixedOverhead + variableOverhead * tableSize + A*numKeys + B*numValues + Memory(allKeys) + Memory(allValues)

of course it'll vary a lot depending on this and that, but even a rough within-a-factor-of-2 estimate would be immensely useful.

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I know that I've answered that stuff several times already but I can't even find my own posts for it.. here's the really short, incomplete version for hotspot: Every object has 2 words overhead and are 8byte aligned. arrays have an additional 4byte for the size. Reference size depends on JVM bitness, but compressed oops exist for for heaps <32gb on 64bit systems. –  Voo Mar 22 '12 at 2:03
    
I wonder if visualvm could do this for you... theres a memory profiler, but I've never used it. –  exabrial Mar 22 '12 at 2:17
    
I haven't managed to find your answers for it either =D If you can find one of your old answers which covers this that would be awesome. –  Li Haoyi Mar 22 '12 at 2:28
    
Write a shell script, which will initialize one of them, depending on an parameter 1 for Array, List, ... and a second parameter for number of elements (1M, 2M, 4M) and then call this program in 3 loops, iterating over your program, and reduce the -Xmx -Param while doing so, to find out the lower bound. I would expect the collections to be nearly equal in size, independent from the type of collection. –  user unknown Mar 22 '12 at 7:39
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Check this out. From Java code to Java heap-Understanding and optimizing your application's memory usage

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Nice find! That is exactly what I was looking for –  Li Haoyi Mar 22 '12 at 13:19
1  
this one can help too slideshare.net/aszegedi/… –  George Mar 22 '12 at 14:14
    
That's the one I thought i saw, but I never did manage to find it when I actually went back to look. Thanks! –  Li Haoyi Mar 22 '12 at 17:03
    
Since the link nowhere mentions which JVM they're talking about (that's a serious flaw and should be pretty disconcerting), it may be right. But if we're talking about Hotspot the given object header is about a decade out of date. Heck he doesn't even mention anywhere that memory is 8byte aligned. The article is dubious at best.. well, or since he's an IBM guy he's talking about their JVM - I've no idea about that one. –  Voo Mar 22 '12 at 23:53
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This table is quite exhaustive, and deals precisely with the JDK implementation choices measured in bytes per entry/element. If you want to do it on your own machine -- if you're running on a different machine, perhaps -- this Google Code site will let you download its source. http://code.google.com/p/memory-measurer/wiki/ElementCostInDataStructures

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This is pretty rough but these estimates should be correct. These are for the bare-bones data structures without including length variables or any other extras that tend to be included in Java.

where dataType is the type of data being stored

Array: (length n)
    n*sizeOf(dataType)

LinkedList:
    n*(sizeOf(dataType)+sizeOf(pointer))+sizeOf(pointer[head pointer])

List: 
    Array-backed=SpaceEfficiency(Array)
    LinkedList-backed=SpaceEfficiency(LinkedList)

HashMap: with v values, k keys
    v*sizeOf(valueDataType)

Tree: k-way tree with n nodes
    n*(sizeOf(nodeDataType)+(k*sizeOf(pointer)))+sizeOf(pointer[head pointer])

Graph: e edges, v vertices
    AdjacencyList:
        at most: v*((v*sizeOf(vertexDataType))+(e*sizeOf(pointer))) fully connected graph
        at least: v*sizeOf(vertexDataType) disconnected graph
    AdjacencyMatrix:
        v^2*sizeOf(int)
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That's useful but I know how to theoretically analyze this stuff too =). It's the constants I'm interested in: what (in bytes) is the per-item overhead in an array? in a linked list? in a HashMap? What is the fixed overhead? I'd like something slightly more detailed than this, which is effectively asymptotic notation without any of the constants. –  Li Haoyi Mar 22 '12 at 6:11
    
I'm confused as to how anything but what we determine theoretically is even an issue. So I mean there should be no per-item overhead in an array right? the per-item overhead in a linked-list is just that of the pointer to the next node, the overhead in a HashMap is non-existent (except for the space in memory to store the code to do the hashing algorithm) because it's just an array. Are you looking for something even more specific than this? Anything that gets more specific is a result of java implementation choices. Or is that what you were looking for? I'm finding this rather interesting:p –  Mako Mar 22 '12 at 6:56
    
The OP is asking about the Java implementation choices, @Mako. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 22 '12 at 9:54
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Here is a simple program, which just consumes RAM:

import java.util.*;
/**
    RamInit (c) GPLv3

    @author Stefan Wagner
    @date Do 22. Mär 08:40:40 CET 2012

*/
public class RamInit
{
    private java.lang.Object consumer; 

    public RamInit (char type, int size)
    {
        switch (type) 
        {
            case 'a': Integer [] ai = new Integer [size]; 
                for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) 
                    ai[i] = i; 
                consumer = ai; 
                break;
            case 'l': List<Integer> li = new ArrayList<Integer> (); 
                for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) 
                    li.add (i); 
                consumer = li;
                break;
            case 'h': HashMap <Integer, Integer> hm = new HashMap <Integer, Integer> (); 
                for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) 
                    hm.put (i, size - i); 
                consumer = hm;
                break;
            case 'L': LinkedList <Integer> ll = new LinkedList <Integer> (); 
                for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) 
                    ll.add (i);     
                consumer = ll;          
                break;
            default: System.err.println ("invalid: " + type);
        }
    }

    public static void main (String args[])
    {
        char type = 'a';
        int size = 1000000; // 1M
        if (args.length == 2)
        {
            type = args[0].charAt (0);
            size = Integer.parseInt (args[1]);
        }
        try {
            new RamInit (type, size);
        }
        catch (OutOfMemoryError oome)
        {
            System.exit (1);
        }
    }
}

And here is a very simple script to test it:

#!/bin/bash

iterProg () {
ram=$1
maxram=$2 
typ=$3
size=$4
# echo java -Xmx${ram}M RamInit $typ $((size*1000*1000)) 
echo -n "." 
java -Xmx${ram}M RamInit $typ $((size*1000*1000)) && echo -en "\n"$typ $size ${ram}M || { 
    if (($ram==$maxram))
    then
        # echo "fail" 
        return 
    else 
        iterProg $((ram+1)) $maxram $typ $size 
    fi
    }
}

# try from 16 MB to 256
for typ in {a,l,h,L}; do 
  for size in {1,2,4}; do 
    iterProg $((size*17+1)) 256 $typ $size 
  done
done

It is a primitive iterator and should be replaced by something more sophisticated - for example if you need 37MB to call RamInit with Collection a and 1M elements, you should start for 2M elements with more than that.

And you should choose steps in a binary search, for example if 20M is too less, check 128, then (20+128)/2, then the avg of that, depending on success or failure with the lower limit or the upper limit.

Since a HashMap stores 2 Ints per element, it could start with roughly the double size of List/Array/Vector. However - times flies like an arrow, and while writing, the result is finished:

bash iterRamFind.sh 
..
a 1 19M.....
a 2 39M...............
a 4 83M..
l 1 19M.......
l 2 41M.......................
l 4 91M..............................................
h 1 63M.............................................................................................
h 2 127M...........................................................................................................................................................................................
h 4 255M......................
L 1 39M.................................................
L 2 83M...............................................................................................
L 4 163

The value 17 explains itself from first experiments. As we can see, the size increases in nearly linear manner.

Modifying the code to check for the influence it you use Longs, is up to you - I guess you will end with a factor of 2.

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On Infoq, there is a presentation infoq-11-nov-jvmperformance.mp3 from a worker at twitter: Pdf-slides, Audio:mp3 and Video.

It deals a lot about collections and other details of size of objects in the JVM.

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