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I'm doing a learning exercise and creating my own linked list with an iterator. The class is as follows:

public class LinkedList<T> implements Iterable <T> {
    private Node<T> head;
    private Node<T> tail;
    private int size;

    public LinkedList() {
        head = new Node<T>();
        tail = new Node<T>();
        head.setNext(tail);  
        tail.setPrevious(head);
        size = 0;
    }

    public void append(T element) {
        tail.getPrevious().setNext(new Node<T>(element));
        tail.getPrevious().getNext().setNext(tail);
        tail.getPrevious().getNext().setPrevious(tail.getPrevious());
        tail.setPrevious(tail.getPrevious().getNext()); 
        size++;
    }

    public void prepend(T element) {
        head.getNext().setPrevious(new Node<T>(element));
        head.getNext().getPrevious().setPrevious(head);
        head.getNext().getPrevious().setNext(head.getNext());
        head.setNext(head.getNext().getPrevious());
        size++;
    }

    public void remove(Node<T> nodeToRemove) {
        if(!isEmpty()) {
            nodeToRemove.getPrevious().setNext(nodeToRemove.getNext());
            nodeToRemove.getNext().setPrevious(nodeToRemove.getPrevious());
            nodeToRemove.setNext(null);
            nodeToRemove.setPrevious(null);
            nodeToRemove.setElement(null);
            nodeToRemove = null;
            size--;
        }
    }


    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return size() == 0;
    }

    public int size() {
        return size;
    }   

    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
        return new Cursor<T>(head);
    }

    public String toString() {
        String result = "";

        for(T t : this) {
            result += t.toString() + "\n";
        }

        return result;
    }

    private final class Cursor<E> implements Iterator<E> {
        private Node<E> current;

        public <E> Cursor(Node<E> head) {
            this.current = current;
        }

        public boolean hasNext() {
            return current.getNext().getNext() != null;
        }

        public E next() {
            current = current.getNext();

            return current.getElement();
        }

        public void remove() {
            remove(current);
        }
    }
}

After doing quite a bit of research it appears a good way to implement the iterator is to do it as an innner class. However, I'm getting a compile error with my remove method in the cursor class. I believe it's because of a type mismatch although the error I'm getting is remove() in LinkedList<T>.Cursor<E> cannot be applied to <Node<E>).

I've wrestled with this for quite some time and I can't understand what is wrong exactly, I would appreciate any insights you may have.

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Can you post the error? It is hard for us to tell what the problem is when all we have is an error occured –  Hunter McMillen Mar 22 '12 at 2:01

1 Answer 1

There are a few things wrong:

  1. You have 2 methods called remove. Java thinks you are trying to call remove in the inner Cursor class which takes no parameters. You have to qualify the reference like this:

    LinkedList.this.remove(current);

  2. Your inner cursor class is non-static. Non-static inner classes are associated with the outer class instance that created them. Basically, they maintain a parent pointer to the outer class object. This is correct for implementing an iterator, but you need to change how you're using generics. Non-static inner classes can use the type parameters of their parent class. This means you can change your iterator definition to:

    private final class Cursor implements Iterator<T>

    and it will automatically use the <T> from LinkedList.

  3. this.current = current; should probably be this.current = head;

  4. Why does hasNext call getNext() twice?

Hope that helps.

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Eh... such a silly thing... I call getNext() twice due to the existence of sentinel nodes. So if I was to call it only once I'd get a reference to the tail sentinel node and it will continue for 1 more iteration incorrectly. –  user1284816 Mar 22 '12 at 2:30

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