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I am working with geospatial shapes and looking at the centroid algorithm here,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centroid#Centroid_of_polygon

I have implemented the code in C# like this (which is just this adapted),

Finding the centroid of a polygon?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Point> vertices = new List<Point>();

        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 1, Y = 1 });
        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 1, Y = 10 });
        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 2, Y = 10 });
        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 2, Y = 2 });
        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 10, Y = 2 });
        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 10, Y = 1 });
        vertices.Add(new Point() { X = 1, Y = 1 });

        Point centroid = Compute2DPolygonCentroid(vertices);
    }

    static Point Compute2DPolygonCentroid(List<Point> vertices)
    {
        Point centroid = new Point() { X = 0.0, Y = 0.0 };
        double signedArea = 0.0;
        double x0 = 0.0; // Current vertex X
        double y0 = 0.0; // Current vertex Y
        double x1 = 0.0; // Next vertex X
        double y1 = 0.0; // Next vertex Y
        double a = 0.0;  // Partial signed area

        // For all vertices except last
        int i=0;
        for (i = 0; i < vertices.Count - 1; ++i)
        {
            x0 = vertices[i].X;
            y0 = vertices[i].Y;
            x1 = vertices[i+1].X;
            y1 = vertices[i+1].Y;
            a = x0*y1 - x1*y0;
            signedArea += a;
            centroid.X += (x0 + x1)*a;
            centroid.Y += (y0 + y1)*a;
        }

        // Do last vertex
        x0 = vertices[i].X;
        y0 = vertices[i].Y;
        x1 = vertices[0].X;
        y1 = vertices[0].Y;
        a = x0*y1 - x1*y0;
        signedArea += a;
        centroid.X += (x0 + x1)*a;
        centroid.Y += (y0 + y1)*a;

        signedArea *= 0.5;
        centroid.X /= (6*signedArea);
        centroid.Y /= (6*signedArea);

        return centroid;
    }
}

public class Point
{
    public double X { get; set; }
    public double Y { get; set; }
}

The problem is that this algorithm when I have this shape (which is an L shape),

(1,1) (1,10) (2,10) (2,2) (10,2) (10,1) (1,1)

It gives me the result (3.62, 3.62). Which is OK, except that point is outside the shape. Is there another algorithm around that takes this into account?

Basically a person is going to be drawing a shape on a map. This shape might span multiple roads (so could be an L shape) and I want to work out the centre of the shape. This is so I can work out the road name at that point. It doesn't make sense to me for it to be outside the shape if they have drawn a long skinny L shape.

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4  
The centroid of a polygon doesn't have to be inside it. That is only guaranteed to apply for convex polygons. –  Hong Ooi Mar 22 '12 at 2:51
    
Yes the algorithm is correct I agree, but is there another algorithm that will ensure that a point within the polygon is calculated? Ideally the result for the above shape would be (1.5, 1.5). –  peter Mar 22 '12 at 2:57
    
If it makes sense for your problem, you can represent roads as thick lines or even union or rectangles (there by bringing notion of axis in). Your center is mid-point of this axis. –  mho Mar 22 '12 at 4:03
    
Don't use a point to find the name of the road. There would be no guarantee the point would be close enough to the road being outlined. The right thing to do is retrieve the road line segments in that area and figure out which road has the most length in the polygon. –  CodeSlinger Apr 26 '12 at 18:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would recommend not writing this yourself and instead use SharpMap

http://sharpmap.codeplex.com/

They have done a good job giving your centroids (even must be within) and a whole bunch more functionality you might want.

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You may check if .NET 4.5 DbSpatialServices functions, like DbSpatialServices.GetCentroid

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This answer is inspired by the answer by Jer2654 and this source: http://coding-experiments.blogspot.com/2009/09/xna-quest-for-centroid-of-polygon.html

  /// <summary>
  /// Method to compute the centroid of a polygon. This does NOT work for a complex polygon.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="poly">points that define the polygon</param>
  /// <returns>centroid point, or PointF.Empty if something wrong</returns>
  public static PointF GetCentroid(List<PointF> poly)
  {
     float accumulatedArea = 0.0f;
     float centerX = 0.0f;
     float centerY = 0.0f;

     for (int i = 0, j = poly.Count - 1; i < poly.Count; j = i++)
     {
        float temp = poly[i].X * poly[j].Y - poly[j].X * poly[i].Y;
        accumulatedArea += temp;
        centerX += (poly[i].X + poly[j].X) * temp;
        centerY += (poly[i].Y + poly[j].Y) * temp;
     }

     if (accumulatedArea < 1E-7f)
        return PointF.Empty;  // Avoid division by zero

     accumulatedArea *= 3f;
     return new PointF(centerX / accumulatedArea, centerY / accumulatedArea);
  }
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public static Point GetCentroid( Point[ ] nodes, int count )
{
    int x = 0, y = 0, area = 0, k;
    Point a, b = nodes[ count - 1 ];

    for( int i = 0; i < count; i++ )
    {
        a = nodes[ i ];

        k = a.Y * b.X - a.X * b.Y;
        area += k;
        x += ( a.X + b.X ) * k;
        y += ( a.Y + b.Y ) * k;

        b = a;
    }
    area *= 3;

    return ( area == 0 ) ? Point.Empty : new Point( x /= area, y /= area );
}
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1  
code without reference which formula you use, has no worth –  AlexWien Jul 10 '13 at 18:27
    
Looks like this is based on the same algorithm as used here: coding-experiments.blogspot.com/2009/09/… –  RenniePet Nov 3 '13 at 5:53

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