Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to find the largest prime factor of the number x, Python gives me the error that the range is too large. I've tried using x range but I get an OverflowError: Python int too large to convert to C long

x = 600851475143
maxPrime = 0


for i in range(x):
    isItPrime = True
    if (x%i == 0):
        for prime in range(2,i-1):
            if (i%prime == 0):
                isItPrime = False
        if (isItPrime == True):

            if (i > maxPrime):
                maxPrime = i;

print maxPrime
share|improve this question
    
What operating system? –  agf Mar 22 '12 at 4:57
    
You need to go about your algorithm in another manner. –  Austin Henley Mar 22 '12 at 4:59
    
I use Windows 7 64x –  Alberto Does Mar 22 '12 at 5:00
    
You could also use a while i < 600851475143 and don't forget to increment i –  wim Mar 22 '12 at 5:08
    
If you were not getting a range error, you would have gotten a ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero. It looks like you are using your range to mod your value, and range starts from 0, so you must be doing x % 0 in the first iteration. On linux, I get MemoryError with your code. –  hughdbrown Mar 13 '13 at 17:46
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

In old (2.x) versions of Python, xrange can only handle Python 2.x ints, which are bound by the native long integer size of your platform. Additionally, range allocates a list with all numbers beforehand on Python 2.x, and is therefore unsuitable for large arguments.

You can either switch to 3.x (recommended), or a platform where long int (in C) is 64 bit long, or use the following drop-in:

import itertools
range = lambda stop: iter(itertools.count().next, stop)

Equivalently, in a plain form:

def range(stop):
   i = 0
   while i < stop:
       yield i
       i += 1
share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for an iterator version of range() but couldn't find a pre-made one in the docs. Simple enough ;) –  Blender Mar 22 '12 at 5:01
2  
On Windows, even 64-bit Python 2.x will probably have this problem, see What is the bit size of long on 64-bit Windows? –  agf Mar 22 '12 at 5:02
    
@agf Clarified. –  phihag Mar 22 '12 at 5:05
1  
@Serdalis Unless I'm mistaken, itertools.count has no stop parameter. This is a very simplistic implementation of Python 3.x's range. –  phihag Mar 22 '12 at 5:09
1  
@Serdalis You could still use count: iter(itertools.count().next, stop). –  agf Mar 22 '12 at 5:19
show 7 more comments

This is what I would do:

def prime_factors(x):
    factors = []
    while x % 2 == 0:
        factors.append(2)
        x /= 2
    i = 3
    while i * i <= x:
        while x % i == 0:
            x /= i
            factors.append(i)
        i += 2
    if x > 1:
        factors.append(x)
    return factors

>>> prime_factors(600851475143)
[71, 839, 1471, 6857]

It's pretty fast and I think it's right. It's pretty simple to take the max of the factors found.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that's a very good point –  Alberto Does Mar 23 '12 at 3:26
    
EulerProject 12 has shed some lights.Thank you. –  zionpi May 8 '13 at 5:06
    
can u explain how u did the code.i mean this is really fast how u reached to this solution –  sundar nataraj Сундар Jun 11 at 12:23
    
@sundar: (1) you don't have to check every number -- only those that are potentially prime. No even number after 2 is prime, so skip those. Then you can count up from 3 by 2's. (2) You only have to go to the square root of the number. (3) You only have to iterate until you exceed the original value divided by all the factors encountered. –  hughdbrown Jun 17 at 22:09
add comment

I would definitely stick with xrange since creating a list between 0 and what looks like a number rivaled by infinity would be taxing for memory. xrange will generate only the numbers when asked. For the number too large problem, you might want to try a "long". This can be achieved by writing a L on the end of the number. I made my own version to test it out. I put in a small sleep as to not destroy my computer into virtually a while(1) loop. I was also impatient to see the program come to a complete end, so I put in print statements

from time import sleep

x = 600851475143L
maxPrime = 0

for i in xrange(1,x):
    isItPrime = True
    if (x%i) == 0:
        for prime in xrange(2,i-1):
            if (i%prime) == 0:
                isItPrime = False
                break
        if isItPrime:
            maxPrime = i
            print "Found a prime: "+str(i)
    sleep(0.0000001)


print maxPrime

Hope this helps!

EDIT: I also did a few more edits to yield this version. It is fairly efficient and I checked quite a few numbers this program provides (it seems to check out so far):

from time import sleep

x = 600851475143L

primes = []

for i in xrange(2,x):
    isItPrime = True
    for prime in primes:
        if (i%prime) == 0:
            isItPrime = False
            break
    if isItPrime:
        primes.append(i)
        print "Found a prime: "+str(i)
    sleep(0.0000001)


print primes[-1]
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work on Python 2.x 32-bit (or even 64-bit on Windows). It is no different than the version in the question. The problem is with the C long, not the Python long. –  agf Mar 22 '12 at 5:24
    
To quote @agf: Read his question more closely. xrange is limited by the platform's long int size. –  phihag Mar 22 '12 at 5:25
add comment

The accepted answer suggests a drop-in replacement for xrange, but only covers one case. Here is a more general drop-in replacement.

def custom_range(start=0,stop=None,step=1):
    '''xrange in python 2.7 fails on numbers larger than C longs.
    we write a custom version'''
    if stop is None:
        #handle single argument case. ugly...
        stop = start
        start = 0
    i = start
    while i < stop:
        yield i
        i += step

xrange=custom_range
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.