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This question may sound weird but I am interested if it's possible to override a java hash map's get() method in scala so that: if the value is not in the hash map, instead of returning null we print some statement and call another method?

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While it is possible, it is not actually a good idea as you violate the Map interface. It is a better idea to encapsulate the class into another object that does not implement Map. –  Jed Wesley-Smith Mar 22 '12 at 6:42
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As Jed and paradigmatic already pointed out, this kind of overriding a single method of a larger class might be problematic. For example, map client code might expect that contains and get correspond.

If you insist on doing it, you can separate the printing of the missing value and the returning of a default value into separate traits.

import java.util.{ Map, HashMap }
trait NotFoundPrinting[K, V] extends Map[K, V] {
  abstract override def get(k: AnyRef): V = {
    val v = super.get(k)
    if (v == null) {
      println("not found: " + k)
      v
    } else {
      v
    }
  }
}

trait Default[K, V] extends Map[K, V] {
  abstract override def get(k: AnyRef): V = {
    val v = super.get(k)
    if (v == null) default else v
  }
  def default: V
}

def test[A: Manifest](h: HashMap[String, Int]) {
  h.put("existing", 1)
  println("existing")
  println(h.get("existing"))
  println("missing")
  println(h.get("missing"))
  println()

}
test(new HashMap[String, Int] with NotFoundPrinting[String, Int])
test(new HashMap[String, Int] with Default[String, Int] {
  val default = 42
})
test(new HashMap[String, Int] with NotFoundPrinting[String, Int] with Default[String, Int] {
  val default = 42
})
// The next one is not useful, it would only print if default was null which is kind of pointless.
test(new HashMap[String, Int] with Default[String, Int] with NotFoundPrinting[String, Int] {
  val default = 42
})

will print

existing
1
missing
not found: missing
null

existing
1
missing
42

existing
1
missing
not found: missing
42

existing
1
missing
42
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I strongly suggest avoiding inheritance of Java collections. Even in a purely OO context, the GoF book has strong arguments against that kind of inheritance. But if you really want it, you can, look at other answers.

Now, in a Scala context, you have two main options:

  1. You convert it to a Scala Map and you call the withDefault method wich does what you are looking for. There are several ways of converting collection from and to Java.

  2. If this option is not suitable for you, you can consider using composition with an implicit view (aka pimp-my-library style). Implicit views are perhaps overused these days, but they allow to enrich existing class (that you don't control) without messing with inheritance.

If you need code example, leave a comment.

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Sure; neither the class nor the method are marked final. You just need to use AnyRef instead of Object when overriding the method.

scala> val x = new java.util.HashMap[String, String] {
     |   override def get(x: AnyRef): String = {
     |     super.get(x) match {
     |       case null => println("not found"); anotherMethod
     |       case v => v
     |     }
     |   }
     |
     |   def anotherMethod = "default"
     | }
x: java.util.HashMap[String,String] = {}

scala> x.get("foo")
not found
res3: String = default
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