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I am trying to understand how stringstream works in order to be able to identify and convert possible numbers that were inputted as strings... for some reason this small piece of code I wrote to try and understand stringstream is being annoying with a few errors...

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int str2int (const string &str) {
  std::stringstream ss(str);
  int num;
  if((ss >> num).fail())
  { 
      num = 0;
      return num;
  }
  return num;
}

int main(){
    int test;
    int t = 0;
    std::string input;
    while (t !=1){
        std::cout << "input: ";
        std::cin >> input;
        test = str2int(input);
        if(test == 0){
            std::cout << "Not a number...";
        }else
            std::cout << test << "\n";
        std::cin >> t;
    }
    return 0;
}

Errors:

Error C2079:'ss' uses undefined class std::basic_stringstream<_elem,_traits,_alloc>'
Error C2228: left of '.fail' must have class/struct/union
Error C2440: 'initializing': cannot convert 'const std::string' into 'int'

what am I doing wrong?

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1  
Not the reason behind the error messages, but one thing you're doing wrong is using stringstream, when you should be using istringstream. (The use of fail is also not very idiomatic.) –  James Kanze Mar 22 '12 at 9:33
    
Please accept an answer to this question. –  Geoff Mar 6 '13 at 22:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to include the following header file -

#include <sstream>

Whenever you see some error like undefined class or something, you should look for missing header files in your code.

Here is the documentation for the stringstream class.

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To use stringstream, you need to do;

#include <sstream>

After that, everything seems to work as it should.

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smdh... I should go to bed lol. that kind of lack of attention is unacceptable... thanks. –  Gal Appelbaum Mar 22 '12 at 5:44

You need to include sstream.

#include <sstream>

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Include this:

#include <sstream>

Also, write this:

if(ss >> num) //no .fail()
{ 
   return num; //read succeeded
}
return 0; //read failed

By the way, you could use std::cin >> test in the main() itself as:

int main(){
    int test;
    int t = 0;
    while (t !=1){
        std::cout << "input: ";
        if (std::cin >> test)
             std::cout << test << "\n";  //read succeeded
        else 
             std::cout << "Not a number...";  //read failed
        std::cin >> t;
    }
    return 0;
}

No need of str2int function!

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1  
Or simply return ss >> num ? num : 0;? (Although I'd probably separate the >> out into a separate statement. ss >> num; return ss ? num : 0;.) –  James Kanze Mar 22 '12 at 9:35
    
@JamesKanze: That's nice. :-) –  Nawaz Mar 22 '12 at 9:42

I need to add - if your project uses precompiled headers (for example, "stdafx.h" for Win32 console app or "pch.h" for Windows Store app) - please check that they are included ahead of <sstream>.

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