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This question was asked in one of the interview : Given two unsorted array, check if it will create the same bst. eg: 2, 1, 4, 0 and 2, 1, 0, 4 will both form same BST.

     2
    / \
   1   4
  /
 0

please suggest some good algo.

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"same BST": semantically [containing the same elements] or structurally [the two trees should have the same structure]? –  amit Mar 22 '12 at 8:14
    
@amit please refer link mentioned by gaurav to see what it means if two BST are equal.. –  algo-geeks Mar 22 '12 at 8:36
    
I am glad you were understood - but for next time, there are two kinds of "equality" - semantic and structural - you should mention which one you are seeking. –  amit Mar 22 '12 at 8:39
    
I was also asked exactly the same question and the interviewer kept saying that in some way I had to use Divide and Conquer for solving this. –  Saurabh Verma Feb 13 at 11:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  • Take the first element - This will be the root (in the above case it is 2)
  • All the elements which are lesser than the root element should appear in the same order in both the arrays
    • In the above example, 0 and 1 are the elements lesser than the root elements.
    • In the first array the order is 1, 0
    • Same order is maintained in the second array. So both form the same structure
  • All the elements which are greater then the root element should appear in the same order in both the arrays

    • In the above example 4 is the only element greater than 2. It appears in the both the arrays. And hence both the arrays create BST which are structurally the same.
  • And of course the very first condition is that both the arrays should contain the same elements but in different order .

Hence this can be solved in linear time.

Pseudocode would be like this:

int GetNextIncresingElement(int[] arr, ref int index, int root)
{
    for(int i = index; i< arr.Length; i++)
    {
        if(arr[i] > root)
        {
            index = i;
            return arr[i];
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

int GetNextDecreasingElement(int[] arr, ref int index, int root)
{
    for(int i = index; i< arr.Length; i++)
    {
        if(arr[i] <= root)
        {
            index = i;
            return arr[i];
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

bool CheckFormsSameBST(int[] arr1, int[] arr2)
{
    int index1 = 1;
    int index2 = 1;
    int num1;
    int num2;

    int root = arr1[0];
    if(root != arr2[0])
        return false;

    while(true)
    {
        num1 = GetNextIncresingElement(arr1, ref index1, root);
        num2 = GetNextIncresingElement(arr2, ref index2, root);     

        if(num1 != num2)
            return false;       
        else
        {
            if(num1 == -1)
                break;
        }   

        index1++;
        index2++;
    }

    index1 = 1;
    index2 = 1;
    while(true)
    {
        num1 = GetNextDecreasingElement(arr1, ref index1, root);
        num2 = GetNextDecreasingElement(arr2, ref index2, root);        

        if(num1 != num2)
            return false;       
        else
        {
            if(num1 == -1)
                break;
        }   

        index1++;
        index2++;
    }

    return true;
}
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5  
Your conditions of strict ordering cover only a few cases. Consider: A1 = [2, 1, 4, 0, 3, 7] and A2 = [2, 4, 1, 0, 7, 3] –  srbhkmr Mar 22 '12 at 15:30

I agree with the idea Peter and Algorist described. But I believe the sub-trees of each node (represented by the array less than this node and the array larger than it) need to be examined in this fashion as well. For example, 621407 and 621047 yield the same BST but 624017 does not. The function can be written recursively.

sample code added:

bool sameBST(int * t1, int * t2, int startPos, int endPos) {
    int rootPos1, rootPos2;
    if (endPos-startPos<0) return true;
    if (t1[startPos]!=t2[startPos]) return false;
    rootPos1=partition(t1,startPos,endPos,t1[startPos]);
    rootPos2=partition(t2,startPos,endPos,t2[startPos]);
    if (rootPos1!=rootPos2) return false;
    return sameBST(t1,t2,startPos,rootPos1-1) && sameBST(t1,t2,rootPos1+1,endPos);
}

Function partition is the same one you use in quicksort. Apparently, T(n)=2T(n/2)+O(n), which leads to time complexity T(n)=O(nlogn). Because of the recursion, the space complexity is O(logn)

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You can check the detailed explaining comparing two binary trees(not just BST) at Determine if two binary trees are equal. It is easy to create BST from the arrays and then run the algorithm in the mentioned questions.

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IMO, you can sort one array and do a binary search from the second array to the sorted array, meanwhile, make sure that you are using every element. It will cost you mlogn.

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check for the case 2, 0, 1 ,4.You first sort it and then search every element of another array (2,1,0,4) in it.you will find all the element and both of them will not form same BST. –  algo-geeks Mar 22 '12 at 7:15

check if it will create the same bst?

Yes.

start taking the first element as root and keep the number which is greater than root to the right and smaller than root to the left.

if you follow the above procedure you will observe that both the trees are identical.

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The point may be to compare permutations of the sub-segments of one array with the respective subsegments of the other array (think level order):

starting with the first element in the array, for i=0 to some n, group the elements in sets of 2^i

2^0 = 1: the first element is the root -- must start both arrays:[50].

2^1 = 2: any permutation of the next 2 elements is fine:

[25,75] or [75,25]

2^2=4: any permutation of the next 4 elements is fine:

[10, 35, 60, 85] or [60, 35, 10, 85] or ...

2^3=8: any permutation of the next 8 elements is fine:

 [5, 16, 30, 40, ….

so on to 2^n until the arrays are empty. respective subsegments must have the same number of elements.

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