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I read about the class autoloading in PHP, but till now I didn't understand why we should use __autoload() method?

I read that

PHP doesn't use this method becuase it has the handy little include functions, include_once and require_once, that prevent you from loading the same file more than once, but unlike a compiled language, PHP re-evaluates these expressions over and over during the evaluation period each time a file containing one or more of these expressions is loaded into the runtime in this site why we should use autoloading,

but I don't understand what is the meaning of PHP re-evaluates in the above statement!! why require-once don't solve the problem of loading php file more than once?

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1  
This snippet is totally meaningless without context. "PHP doesn't use this method" --> what method? And frankly, the author does not sound very convincing. –  Jon Mar 22 '12 at 7:45
    
@PalAla link is broken! –  Songo Mar 22 '12 at 7:48
    
Sorry,I modify it, it works now. –  palAlaa Mar 22 '12 at 7:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The original article is more clear when you read it more widely (see below) :

It simply says that __autoload() is smarter than include_once() because the function include_once() has to be coded explicitly when the class may be required, and also because this function needs to be processed each time it appears in order to know if the file given in argument is already loaded or not.

The other function __autoload(), on the contrary, can be called only once for several classes you may need. And then PHP tryes to load the corresponding source file only when a class definition is missing.

We can sum up this argumentation by saying: you need one include_once() for each Class/Function source, while only one __autoload() may be enough for a set of Class source having the same location rule.

Snippet of the article:

Why you should use an autoload function in PHP

The loading of classes is something that managed languages like Java and C# don't need to worry about, class loaders are built into the compiler.

 [...]

PHP doesn't use this method becuase it has the handy little include functions, include_once and require_once, that prevent you from loading the same file more than once, but unlike a compiled language, PHP re-evaluates these expressions over and over during the evaluation period each time a file containing one or more of these expressions is loaded into the runtime. That is where the Standard PHP Library (SPL), introduced in PHP 5, and the wonderful little _autoload function come in to enhance the speed and uniformity of your PHP code.

__autoload is a magic function, that you define, that enables PHP to let you know when it doesn't have a class loaded, but that class needs to be loaded.

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but till now I didn't understand why we should use it

When you have structured and organized your work, because of the organization it results that you have many similar class files. The simpler example is an mvc, but not only, any custom structure will result in similar files containing a class, then because of the similarity you put them in the same folder and also you use a common file naming convention for example you can have a controller and a model directory.. check example file: employeeModel.php, statisticsModel.php, indexController.php, errorController.php

Well you can take advantage of this fact, check this customized autoload function:

/*** function to include model and view classes ***/
    function __autoload($class_name) 
    {if(__DEBUG) eval(__DEBUG_EVAL);

          /*** Load a model class ***/  
          $mfile=__SITE_PATH .'model/'.$class_name.'.php';//echo 'model file'.NL;v($file);
           if (file_exists($mfile)){
            include ($mfile);
                if(__DEBUG) //store debug info before include
                    eval('error_log("autoload Success file exists: ".$mfile.NL);');
            return true;
            }

          /*** Load a view class ***/   
          $cfile=__SITE_PATH .'view/'.'/'.substr($class_name,0,-4).'/'.$class_name.'.php';//v($file);
           if (file_exists($cfile)){ 
            include ($cfile);
                if(__DEBUG) //store debug info before include
                    eval('error_log("autoload Success file exists: ".$cfile.NL);');
            return true;
            }
            return false;
    }

It also has a few lines for debugging that can easily be removed later. Because of similarity in things it can decide it self what to include and also to report errors when occur. Without this autoload function you would have to care that class files are availoable before use. Also this function will allow to include a file once, if you check carefully it does not use include_once, this means that autoload fires only when the file has not been seen before, in contrary to simple file inclusion which is fired every time the code is executed as very correctly decese notice it.

Conclusion Autload = fires once per file, automates things, so you execute a class directly without caring to include it.

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The include_once statement itself is reevaluated whenever encountered.

for ($i = 0; $i < 100; $i++) {
    include_once 'foo.php';
    new Foo;
}

This will evaluate ("run") the include_once 100 times. That can be something of a slowdown. On the other hand:

for ($i = 0; $i < 100; $i++) {
    new Foo;
}

When using autoloading, the logic for file inclusion will only be triggered once, the first time the class is needed.

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I make an echo statement inside the autoloading function, I change the echo statement and refresh the page, the view is not changed! that means the object is initialized only once. but what I should do to reinitialize the object? I try to close the browser and reopen it but it doesn't change the content. –  palAlaa Mar 22 '12 at 7:58
    
Sorry, what? All this does not apply to refreshing pages, only to doing the same thing several times within the same request. –  deceze Mar 22 '12 at 8:12
    
Not it fire the object once and even I change the content of the constructor, the view doesn't changed! –  palAlaa Mar 22 '12 at 8:27

Autoloading means if you need some classes to be included automatically in the scripts like

require_once ("class.user.php");
require_once ("class.module.php");

To avoid such code for each script you can use Autoloading functionality of php

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