Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

What is the best way to handle different subtypes of an abstract supertype as an argument, for instance when handling events.

The situation is as follows:

The supertype:

public interface MySuperInterface {
}

A subtype

public class SubclassA implements MySuperInterface {
}

Another subtype

public class SubclassB implements MySuperInterface {
}

Some class that should be able to handle any subtype of MySuperInterface

public class MySuperHandler {

   public void handle(MySuperInterface mysuper) {
       //do it
   }

}

My different approaches are

  1. a switch/case statement in the handler method. (which I dont like)

  2. a method receive(MySuperHandler) in the interface and a dispatch to this method inside the handle method: mysuper.receive(this) (which means the interface knows the handler class)

  3. Adding a handle method for every subtype in the MySuperHandler class (this does not ensure that every subtype can be handled)

but for the mentioned reasons I'm not content with these solutions.

are there any options to handle this situation?

thanks

share|improve this question
1  
If you accept an interface as a parameter, but still have to know the exact type behind this interface, then perhaps your interface is missing methods? –  MaDa Mar 22 '12 at 9:18
    
Thanks. I think adding some more methods to my interface (like isA() or isB()) would lead to the switch/case solution which I would like to avoid. also I dont think it is the task of the interface to care about its handling in the handler class. Or have I misunderstood? –  zersaegen Mar 22 '12 at 9:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One approach is to use the Visitor Pattern. It would look something like this:

public interface MySuperInterface {
  <T> T acceptVisitor(MySuperInterfaceVisitor<T>);
}

public interface MySuperInterfaceVisitor<T> {
  T visitA(SubclassA a);
  T visitB(SubclassB a);
}

public class SubclassA implements MySuperInterface {
  <T> T acceptVisitor(MySuperInterfaceVisitor<T> visitor) {
    return visitor.visitA(this);
  }
}

public class SubclassB implements MySuperInterface {
  <T> T acceptVisitor(MySuperInterfaceVisitor<T> visitor) {
    return visitor.visitB(this);
  }
}

public class MySuperHandler implements MySuperInterfaceVisitor<Foo>{
  Foo visitA(SubclassA a) {
    // construct Foo from SubclassA instance
  }

  Foo visitB(SubclassB a) {
    // construct Foo from SubclassB instance
  }
}

This is a bit like your #2, except the interface (and the subclasses) don't need to know about the handler. They just need to know about the visitor interface. This is good if you don't want MySuperInterface and its implementations to know about your specific handlers.

BTW, instead of calling:

myHandler.handle(myImpl);

you'd call:

myImpl.acceptVisior(myHandler);

This approach is nice if you want to ensure that every handler can handle every implementation of your interface, yet still keep the implementations from knowing about all of the "handlers" that exist.

If you add another implementation of your interface (MySuperInterface) the compiler will force you to add an acceptVisitor method. This method can either use one of the existing visit* methods, or you'll have to go and add a new one to the visitor interface. If you do the latter, you must then update all of the visitor (aka "handler") implementations. This ensures that every subtype can be handled, going forward.

This approach is more complex than the one in assylias's answer, and only really makes sense if you either want to break the coupling between the implementations of MySuperInterface and your handler code, or you have a strong desire to organize your handler code such that all of the code for a particular type of handling is "together".

One common use of the visitor pattern is rendering objects in different ways. Suppose you want to be able to convert an object into a PDF or HTML. You could have a toHTML and a toPDF method in your interface. The downside to this approach is that now your classes are dependent upon your libraries for generating HTML and PDF. Also, if someone later wants to add a new type of output they need to modify these core classes, which may be undesirable. With the visitor pattern, only the vistior classes need to know about the PDF or HTMl libraries, and new visitors can be added without modifying the core classes. (But again, adding new core classes means you either need to have them reuse an existing visit* method, or you'll have to modify all of the visitor implementations.)

share|improve this answer
    
I was not sure if my dispatch approach (extended to a visitor) was too much for this simple problem but now you kind of confirmed my thoughts I will use this approach. Thank you very much. –  zersaegen Mar 22 '12 at 10:06
    
just another small question: is there a way to use the visitor when I'm not in control of the implementation of MySuperInterface. for instance when I want to handle KeyEvents or something similar? –  zersaegen Mar 22 '12 at 10:09
    
@zersaegen Visitor pattern is a sort of double-dispatch. The first dispatch is done by calling (the polymorphic) acceptVisitor. The second dispatch is done by acceptVisitor calling the visit* method. The first dispatch is the same abstract-method approach that assylias suggests, and adding in the visitor interface gives us a (useful) extra layer of indirection. I point this out because... –  Laurence Gonsalves Mar 22 '12 at 16:08
    
@zersaegen If you can't add acceptVisitor to MySuperInterface then you'll have to use some other type of dispatching for step 1. This boils down to option #1: using conditionals (eg: switch). You can still call an appropriate visit* method from the conditional to get the double-dispatch. This loses the advantage of ensuring that your handlers can handle every possible subtype should a new one be added later (aside from "default"), but there's no real general solution to that problem. The upside is that you only have to write the ugly conditional once, rather than in every handler. –  Laurence Gonsalves Mar 22 '12 at 16:18
    
thanks again :) –  zersaegen Mar 23 '12 at 14:30

Your description is a bit vague but if you have several subclasses, some of which share a common "handle" behavior, this could work - if you only have 2 subclasses and don't plan to have more in the future, the Abstract step is probably unnecessary:

public interface MySuperInterface {
    void handle();
}

public abstract AbstractMySuperInterface {
    public void handle() {
        //implement default behavior
    }
}

public class SubclassA implements MySuperInterface {
    //nothing here, just use default behavior
}

public class SubclassB implements MySuperInterface {
    public void handle() {
        //implement another behavior
    }
}

public class MySuperHandler {

   public void handle(MySuperInterface mysuper) {
       mysuper.handle();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. yes this is an additional approach. what I dont like in this solution is that the interface defines how it is basically handled. what if I would like to add another handler? –  zersaegen Mar 22 '12 at 9:38
    
In your question you mention that you would need to use a switch - I suppose that means each subclass has a specific behavior which should therefore be implemented at the subclass level. Now maybe your handle method can be split - one part where the object does something specific and another part which is common and out of the control of the object. Without knowing more aobut your interface and what handle does it is difficult to be specific... –  assylias Mar 22 '12 at 9:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.