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The following code snippet generates some warning messages when compiling:

Cluster& Myclass::getCluster(const Point &p)
{
    foreach (Cluster c, *this)
        foreach (Point point, c)
            if (point == p)
                return c;
}

The warnings are:

  1. reference to local variable 'c' returned [enabled by default]
  2. control reaches end of non-void function [when using -Wreturn-type]

I know that I am not returning a value if the condition fails. However, when I try return 0 it gave me error.

How can I solve these issues?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean "when I try return 0 it gave me error"? Where did you include return 0 and what was the error? – Chris Mar 22 '12 at 9:36
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your function can legitimately fail to find a matching Cluster, then you should have it return a pointer:

Cluster* Myclass::getCluster(const Point &p)
{
    foreach (Cluster c, *this)
        foreach (Point point, c)
            if (point == p)
                return &c;
    return 0; // or return nullptr; in C++11
}

But this doesn't work yet, because c is a local variable. So you make it a reference, like this:

Cluster* Myclass::getCluster(const Point &p)
{
    foreach (Cluster& c, *this)
        foreach (Point point, c)
            if (point == p)
                return &c;
    return 0; // or "return nullptr;" in C++11
}
share|improve this answer
    
iterating by reference in the inner loop aswell would most likely be preferable: foreach (const Point& point, c). ` – smerlin Mar 22 '12 at 9:53
    
@smerlin: Yes, I agree. – TonyK Mar 22 '12 at 9:55
    
@TonyK thanx that worked for me.... – shobi Mar 22 '12 at 10:00
    
@TonyK Could you give a theory link about Returning a local varaible as a reference? – Dewsworld Mar 22 '12 at 12:10
    
@Dewsworld: I'm not returning a local variable as a reference -- I'm returning the address of c (which, because c is a reference, is the address of an already existing Cluster). The & in line 6 is the "address-of" operator, and the & in line 3 declares c as a reference. This source of confusion is built into C++. – TonyK Mar 22 '12 at 13:14

The first means that c is a local variable. As such, it will go out of scope and die when the function returns. Since you are returning by reference, the caller gets a dangling reference. The other error is that you fail to return anything under certain conditions. Returning 0 doesn't help, because the return type is a reference to Cluster. You need some mechanism to ensure that you return a Cluster reference to a Cluster that doesn't die immediately. See for example this question.

share|improve this answer

The variable c is a local variable, as it's declared and defined inside the getCluster function. By returning a reference to it, when the function returns that reference "point" to where the variable used to be.

For the other warning, what if the condition is never true, then what does the function return?

share|improve this answer
    
You might add that his foreach is a lie, since he won't actually execute for each value. Such lies tend to cause confusion for someone reading the code. – James Kanze Mar 22 '12 at 9:36
1  
@James: Anybody who gets confused by a simple loop like this shouldn't be reading code in the first place. – TonyK Mar 22 '12 at 9:58
    
@TonyK Anybody who writes intentionally misleading code shouldn't be writing code in the first place. Saying you're going to do the following for each element in a sequence, and then not doing it, is intentionally misleading. – James Kanze Mar 22 '12 at 13:25
    
@James: It's using a standard programming construct to perform a task, that's all. "Intentionally misleading" is ridiculous. – TonyK Mar 22 '12 at 13:37

reference to local variable 'c' returned [enabled by default]

You should not return a reference to a local variable because once the function is returned the variable does not exist anymore and hence you have reference to something that does not exist. The compiler warns you of this.

control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type]

Once you specify a return type for a function, every control path should return the value. If the condition evaluates to false then your code never returns anything hence the compiler complains.

share|improve this answer
    
then what should i return here.. – shobi Mar 22 '12 at 9:44
    
@shobi: You should be returning a pointer which points to dynamically allocated memory in case of success, In case of failure you return a NULL, And importantly you should doccument the behavior of this api that in case of success the user should deallocate the allocated memory. – Alok Save Mar 22 '12 at 9:46
    
thanx i got it... – shobi Mar 22 '12 at 9:59
    
@Als: No, you shouldn't be allocating memory here. The Cluster already exists -- all you have to do is return its address. – TonyK Mar 22 '12 at 9:59
    
@TonyK: if the Cluster was being created locally, I don't see how returning its address will solve OPs problem. – Alok Save Mar 22 '12 at 10:54

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